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1981 
aiPS & CRANKS 

% , 

. Davidson College 
Davidson, North Carolina 
28036 




A MYRIAD OF ORANGES drench the Da 
vidson campus during the fall season The 
colors provide the focal point of the land 
scape during the October and Novennber 
months (Photo courtesy of Southern Liv- 
ing Magazine.) 



In The Beginning . . . 
Ambitious Dream 

Haste Thee, Nymph, And Bring With Thee 

Jest And Youthful Jollity 
Quips And Cranks, And Wanton Wiles 

Nods And Becks, And Wreathed Smiles. 



In 1835, a few ambitious Presbyteri- 
ans had a dream. Tfiey envisioned a 
small, manual labor school, nestled in 
the Piedmont Carolinas, whose pur- 
pose was to direct the spiritual, intel- 
lectual, and physical training of 
youth. On August 25, after purchas- 
ing for their endeavor, "four hundred 
and ninety-two acres, lying exactly on 
the crest of the watershed between 
the Yadkin and Catawba Rivers," the 
men of the Presbytery of Concord 
adopted the following resolution: "Re- 
solved, that the manual labor institu- 
tion which we are about to build be 
called Davidson College, as a tribute 
to the memory of that distinguished 
and excellent man. General William 
Davidson, who in the ardor of patrio- 
tism, fearlessly contending for the li- 
berty of his country, fell, universally 
lamented, in the battle Cowans Ford." 
With such a resolution, Davidson Col- 
lege was founded, and on March 1, 
1837, their dream came true; David- 
son opened its doors to its first sixty- 
six students. (Quips and Cranks, 
1895) 

In 1895, a few Davidson students 
had a dream. Their school, which was 
now fifty-six years old, was building a 
heritage, and they sought some way 
to preserve it for themselves and for 
others to come. Working together, the 
Philanthropic and Eumenean soci- 
eties, the two well-respected literary 
societies of the college, compiled a 
history book which utilized photo- 
graphs, poetry, and prose to capture 
their present as well as their past. The 
editors of this first yearbook chose as 



their theme and inspiration the afore- 
mentioned verse from Milton's L'Alle- 
gro, which has continued to serve as 
the invocation, even today. 

In 1980, a few Davidson students 
again had a dream. They sought to 
recapture, through words and pic- 
tures, the spirit of Milton's L'Allegro 

— the same "quips and cranks" per- 
ceived by the first editors as the es- 
sence of Davidson College. Just as 
Milton invoked his nymph to be the 
bearer of "jest" and "jollity," we, this 
year's yearbook staff, invoke this edi- 
tion of Quips and Cranks to bear the 
lighter, carefree side of Davidson life 

— the side we will all remember. 
After all, college life isn't all aca- 
demics. Remember Freshman year? 
When it was good, it was terrific. Soon 
those tearful, "I'm all alone" days be- 
came fewer and fewer; and the calls to 
Mom and Dad became less frequent 
as we got into the swing of Davidson 
life. We could always find something 
to do, from "checking out" the Fresh- 
man Handbook, to "penny-ing in" the 
Hall Councelors, or having shaving 
cream fights with another hall (of the 
opposite sex of course). Oh, for the 
good 'ole days. 

But those days of fun — those 
"quips and cranks" — don't end with 
Freshman year. In spite of sporadic 
attacks of "sophomore slump" and 
"transfer fever," life does go on, and 
better than ever. 

Even after one hundred and forty 
six years, Davidson continues to fulfill 
its original intent of providing an at- 



ROOTED IN STUDY: Senior Hal Wahl poses as a garden 
gnome, and gets some work done, under one of the mariy 
campus maples. 




SHAKING A LEG FOR THE TEAM: cheerleading capta 
Lisa Olson shows genuine enthusiasm, during a hon 
football game. 



http://www.archive.org/details/quipscranks1981davi 



Quips And Cranks 




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An Ambitious Dream . . . 

mosphere conducive to the "spiritual, 
intellectual, and physical training of 
youth." Each lecture and seminar is 
geared toward this ultimate goal. But 
such an atmosphere of learning and 
growth cannot be gained wholly from 
the classroom or lab practical. No, 
each experience and opportunity, 
from a Pre-Med Colloquium to a Satur- 
day dinner party, is an integral part of 
the "total Davidson Experience." 

Davidson academics provide intel- 
lectual growth through a mixture of 
challenge and encouragement. Profes- 
sors are ready, and extremely willing, 
to help anyone who simply takes the 
initiative to ask, and because of the 
low student-faculty ratio, professors 
are able to get to know most students 
on a first name basis. Because of the 
liberal arts emphasis, with its para- 
doxical blend of requirement and flexi- 
bility, Davidson ensures exposure to 
many areas of study, and encourages 
variety and experimentation through 
internships, ROTC, school-sponsored 
trips abroad, and independent studies. 
Independent thinking and independent 
growth are fostered in such an atmo- 

I sphere. 

Davidson does have a Physical Edu- 

I cation requirement, but not too many 
people complain. After a hard-core 
study session, everybody needs to hit 
a few tennis balls or take a few laps 
around the track. Athletics are an ex- 

j cellent outlet. Davidson offers club 

■sports and intramural sports as well 

I Continued on page 6 

mLHOtlETTED AGAINST A SUNSET SKY. Davidson 




DANCING THE NIGHT AWAY. Cathey BosI and Brad 
Mullis enjoy the DCF 40's Dance during winter term. 




SLACKING SENIORS. Lindsay Robertson. Mary Booth 
and Jim Tholen partake in a leisurely afternoon of much 
talk and little study. 

ROLE REVERSAL — Cam Zurbruegg domestically car- 
ries the laundry while his home-town honey. Nonie Mat 
-■- ■ Ith h 



as the traditional inter-collegiate 
teams. Most popular, however, are 
the spontaneous outbursts that come 
with Spring. Those sunstroked days 
make a bicycle ride to the Lake Cam- 
pus or a quick Frisbee golf game 
much more tempting than another 
chapter of Plato's Republic. Sports of- 
fer a much needed break from routine 
and an excellent opportunity to see 
what people are "really" like outside 



of books and classrooms. 

The other organizations and events 
on campus are orientated toward par- 
ticipation and growth. Eating houses 
and Fraternities offer much more than 
good food. They offer parties, dances 
and a place to relax in front of the T.V. 
or a blazing fire. Everyone is, at one 
time or another, invited to take part in 
the fun. 

"Culture" is not to be forgotten dur- 



ing the four years at Davidson. In fa^ 
it is very hard to avoid. Visiting profes- 
sionals supplement the varied and ex- 
tensive talents found among Davidson 
students and professors. Everyone is 
encouraged to participate — whether 
in the audience or on the stage. 



JANUARYS GOLDEN GLOW, plays 
Allen Gnftin and Carol Hoopes as a 



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GOOD P.R. IS ESSENTIAL TO DAVIDSON'S REPUTA- 
TION, and Parents' Weekend Is an excellent way for 
students such as Will Abberger to describe the Davidson 
experience to others. 




THE CINCINNATTI KID. Gifford Piercy. demonstrates a IN QUEST OF QOIET: Julie Cheek has hauled her books 
certain finesse in playing billiards — that's pool for the to the back row of the stadium to enjoy the sun while she 
culturally illiterate. studies 



Quips And Clanks 7- 



An Ambitious Dream . . 

There are also many opportunities 
for growth and learning in the David- 
son community. Area churches spon- 
sor worship services, prayer groups 
and singing groups to which all stu- 
dents are welcomed. Campus and 
town sponsored service organizations 
enable students to learn by sharing 
their talents and interests with a 
neighborhood child or an inmate in a 
nearby prison. All such events and 
activities provide outlets for creativity 



and leadership abilities, as well as just 
plain fun. 

The special feeling of Milton's L'AI- 
legro is alive in all aspects of David- 
son life; but the unifying force, the 
cohesive bond that ties it all together 
is the spirit of each person involved in 
campus life. It is the people and the 
"people first" attitude, that makes Da- 
vidson so unique. Davidson has seen 
so many changes over the years, but 
the concern of students and profes- 




sors for each other, and their world, 
remains constant. 

Traditions have fallen by the way- 
side as the years have progressed: we 
no longer have mandatory ROTC or 
required chapel, and Freshmen can 
even walk on the grass. Policies have 
changed also. Coeducation has been 
approved since 1971, and dancing 
since 1944, and the library no longer 
closes for home football games. But 
with growth and an ever-changing 
world, change is inevitable. One thing 
will never change, however, and that 
is the feeling of belonging to a family 
in which you receive much more than 
you will ever be able to give in return. 

Davidson College cares for its stu- 
dents, and the students care no less 
for their school. There is an intimacy 
which transcends all differences, and 
a common goal which transcends all 
time. That is what Davidson is all 
about. It is that which provides our 
inside jokes and shows our idiosyncra- 
cies. As Milton said, these are our 
"quips and cranks." 

-Tracy Thompson 



B MOVIE STARLET OR SPORTSWOMAN? Margaret 
Ervin practices for her freshman hall IMAC team on one 
sunny fall day. 

STUDY BREAK-Melson Simon and Karen Baldwin illus- 
trate one of the drawbacks of outdoor studying . . . fre- 
quent callers. 




SUPERMAN OR CLARK KENT? Even superheroes have! 
to study, and Jeff Dempsey is no exception; but there's 
nothing to stop one from finding a nice sunny spot in 
which to get comfortable. 



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Literal Arts Within Liberal Arts 



Area I — Language, Literature, Music, and 
the Fine Arts. 

(1) Language and Literature (Departments of 
Classics, English, French, German, Greek, 
Latin, Spanish). 

(2) Art, Music, Theatre and Speech (Depart- 
ments of Art, Music, Theatre and Speech). 
Requirement: three courses, including at 
least one course in each subdivision. 

And so reads the Davidson catalogue under 
"Requirements for Graduation". That means 
each student must choose three courses from 
among dozens that are considered part of 
Area 1. Students must also complete the Eng- 
lish composition requirement and the third- 
term level of a foreign language. 

In the art department courses in the philos- 
ophy and history of art are available as well as 
studio-work classes in drawing, painting, and 
printmaking. The department is looking for 
ward to getting a new building sometime in 
the future. According to Herb Jackson, de- 
partment head, it is "terribly cramped" in the 
present building. 

The traditional languages of Greek and Lat- 
in are taught in the classics department. 
There are also courses available in the drama, 
art and architecture of the classical civiliza- 
tions. George Labban accompanies students 
each spring on a classics abroad trip. 

Besides offering courses in composition, 
the English department has a variety of cre- 
ative writing, literature, poetry and literary 
criticism courses. Two new professors, Cyn- 
thia Lewis and Ann McMillan, joined the de- 
partment this year. On the other hand, this 
was the last year for Charles Cornwell who 

STRUGGLING WITH A CENTURY OF AMERICAN LIT 
ERATORE, Charles Cornwell's English class attempts to 
analyze the writings of Kate Chopin. 



left for seminary. A curriculum change in- 
cluded requirements for senior English ma- 
jors to take their comprehensive exam togeth- 
er in the Dome Room. 

In order to fulfill the language requirement, 
students may choose from five different lan- 
guages: French, Latin, Greek, Spanish and 
German. Students may also take literature, 
conversation, drama, and poetry classes in 
each language. 

Music courses include physics of music, 

A MANICURIST'S NIGHTMARE is braved by Gia Par 
tain in a fall term print-making class. The art department 
offers a variety of studio and art history courses for the 
beginner as well as the veteran. 



music theory, orchestration, conducting and 
composition. There are also seminars avail-^ 
able in ancient music, baroque, classical and 
romantic, and modern music as well as in- 
struction in various instruments and voice. 
This year the department added a course in 
folk music. 

Students who are interested in the theatre 
can learn about the history, studio, directing, 
and general techniques. Courses are also 
available in scenery and lighting. 

The speech department offers courses in 
oral communication, argumentation and de- 
bate. There are also courses in oral interpreta- 
tion of literature and public address studies. 
-Frances Palmer 



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12 STUDENT LIFE 





BEHIND-THE-SCENES set construction is just as impor 
tant to Davidson drama production as the acting itself 
John Teague designed the set for one of the Winter 
Workshops after training in a Theatre Arts course 




TAKING ADVANTAGE of Davidson s applied music pro- 
gram. Peter Gulyn studies the organ under Professor 
Wilmer Welsh Organ students are given access to all the 
college organs, including the famous Blakely organ in 
DCPC 

"PREPARE FOR TAKE-OFF," instructs the feminine. 
French voice as sophomore Jeff Jordan practices his 
verbal language skills in Davidsons language lab. 



Academics 13 



WELCOME TO STATE 0! Over 400 students attend 
"Communism. Racism, and Democracy", the colleges 
solution to the chaos in drop-add, when the schedule of 
course offerings is found to be insufficient. Many signed 
up. expecting a slack term, only to find their scheme 
backfire, as evidenced by a midterm average of 50. 

A DEPARTMENT FAVORITE. Dr. Kaylor takes time out 
to explain a difficult concept to Ann Parker. 






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Philosophy And Religion Departments 



Expanding Into The Future 




IN HIS USUAL AMBULATORY STYLE, visiting profes 
sor Carl Cohen communicates his p>oint emphatically. 



The Philosophy and Religion departments 
began 1980 with vigorous plans for new 
growth. Both departments hope to expand 
considerably their capacity to expose David- 
son students to new concepts, with the addi- 
tion of new personnel and classes. 

Professor MacCormac, head of the Philos- 
ophy department, reports that he hopes to 
hire a new philosophy professor for 1981. For 
that reason a few hopeful applicants visited 
Davidson this year, to speak to faculty and 
students, and to undergo strict evaluation by 
the department. The Philosophy faculty also 
plans to offer more concentrated courses 
soon in social/political philosophy and meta- 
physics, among other topics. The addition of 
a new professor might also allow for some 
switching around of courses that would per- 
mit the introduction of a logic class series. 

In the Spring, the Philosophy department 
also received a renowned guest lecturer. Pro- 
fessor Carl Cohen of the CJniversity of Michi- 
gan. Professor Cohen taught a course on 
"Communism, Facism and Democracy" from 
a textbook that he has written on the subject. 
The class was set with an unlimited enroll- 



ment ceiling, and when 472 students signed 
up there was nothing for it but to hold it in 
Love Auditorium. 

The Religion department is making plans 
this year to hire a new professor who will 
specialize in non-Western religions. Depart- 
ment head. Professor Rhodes, looks forward 
to being able to offer students an in-depth 
look at those Eastern religions which are left 
unstudied in a more traditional religion cur- 
riculum. In addition the department is exam- 
ining the possibility of developing courses on 
Biblical thought in an inter-Testamental con- 
text, perhaps with the aid of yet another pro- 
fessor. 

With future development in mind, the Reli- 
gion department also invited two guests from 
other schools, to scrutinize the present cur- 
riculum and make recommendations. Their 
insights will provide the department with 
some fresh ideas for growth in the next few 
years. 

•Mike Mason 

FULFILLING THE RELIGION REQUIREMENT provokes 
a wide variety of reactions in Davidson students. 




AN INTRODUCTION TO LOGIC proves puzzling to stu- 
dents Bruce Wallace, Dave Stosur, and John Malone. 
Undaunted. Al Mele fields questions after class. 





A HORIZON OF EQUIPMENT makes up the foreground 
for Chemistry 41 student, Cliff Tribus as he performs an 
experiment in the Chemistry lab. 




IT'S MAN AGAINST MACHINE as Tom Marshburn and 
Mark Hammond work in the Physics lab in the basement 
of Dana Science Building. 

SCAPEL POISED. Steve Shields prepares for the dissec- 
tion of his rat in Biology 32. Unlike real-life surgery, 
Davidson students often refer to text books for guidance 
in the middle of operations. 



16 STUDENT LIFE 



Area III 



A Life Or Death Situation 



Area III — for some students it's their life 
and for some, it's potential death to their Da- 
vidson career. But the Biology. Chemistry, 
Physics, and Math departments offer good 
news to all students tackling an Area III 
course. 

For those Area III majors in Biology, Math, 
or Premed, new courses were offered. Among 
them are History of Biology, taught by Dr. 
Putnam, and a revision in Developmental Biol- 
ogy and Genetics, both taught by Dr. Kimmel. 
Additional courses that have been proposed 
but have not yet been approved include a 
graded independent study for Biology majors 
and a math class titled Applications of Finite 
Mathamatics. 

A new biology course has been proposed 
for the non-major student. Biology 01 1, grad- 
ed Independent Study for Non-majors. This, 
along with the 012 series in Biology, Chemis- 
try, and Physics provides the non-science ori- 
ented student with an opportunity to learn 

SHEER CONCENTRATION is a must for success in the 
Chemistry lab. Freshman Richard Peek makes precise 
measurements for his Chemistry 41 lab. 



from the science departments as well as enjoy 
their classes. The labs are particularly inter 
esting In these classes, ranging from field 
trips with Dr. David Grant to making soap 
bubbles and ice cream in Chem 021. 

The Chemistry and Biology departments 
have also shaped up their equipment over the 
last year. The renovated Martin Science build- 
ing with its new modern facilities has been in 
use only two years. Likewise, a Dana Chal- 
lenge fund raiser for the Biology department 
brought in new microscopes, which were 
greatly needed. Further plans for updating 
Biology equipment have been made. 

Thus, depending on your academic inter- 
est, the instructors in the Area III departments 
are trying to make either your life at Davidson 
a little livelier, or your academic "death " a 
little less dreadful. 

-Lisa Sloan 



THE DRaDGERY OF DATA plagues Freshman Chemis 
try student, Adelyn Lutz as she strives toward success in 
one of Davidson's lab courses. 





study The Social Sciences And 



Satisfy The Vocational Voyeur In You 




KNOWM AS ONE OF DAVIDSON'S MOST POPULAR 
HISTORY PROFESSORS, Dr. Shi gives lectures which 
are stimulating and informative. 

PARTICIPATING IN A PROGRAM OF THE EDUCA- 
TION DEPARTMENT, Richard Terry was a student 
teacher of history in Mooresville High School during Win 
ter Term. 




The ultimate "people-watchers," the stu- 
dents of the Social Sciences, study human 
beings and their societies in the depart- 
ments of Political Science, Psychology, 
Economics, History, Education, South- 
Asian Studies, Sociology, and Anthropolo- 
gy- 
Several of the departments welcomed 
new professors to their staffs. Fall term, a 
notable visitor. Dr. W.W. Kulski, was host- 
ed by the Political Science department to 
conduct a seminar on Soviet foreign poli- 
cy. A native of Poland, Dr. Kulski is a 
former Minister of Poland and his work as 
a diplomat has taken him to both NATO 
and Warsaw Pact countries. He has been 



teaching in American colleges and univer- 
sities since he came to this country in 1946 
to avoid the Communist regime in Poland. 

A onetime interdisciplinary course was 
offered during winter term in the Psycholo- 
gy department which traced the emer- 
gence of professions in Psychology from 
the nineteenth century to the present. 

The seven departments of Area IV con- 
tinue to instruct students about humanity 
and its cultures. Although no major 
changes have developed within this year, 
they remain strong departments in which 
approximately 40% of the upperclassmen 
major. 

-Caroline Bourdreau 




AS MEMBERS OF THE PSYCHOLOGY DEPART- 



SITTING IN CLARK ROSS' ECONOMICS CLASS. 



MENT'S EXPERIMENTAL COURSE. Mark Sheffield economics majors Trey Thies, Jeff Heath, Keith Hearle. 

and Melissa Peacock work in lab with their rats. ^''^" Hoffman, and Dale Withrow are fulfilling one of 

their MAJOR requirements. 



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18 STUDENT LIFE 



SOCIAL STUDIES: UNDER THE DIRECTION OF SO- 
CIOLOGY PROFESSOR ROBERT RUTH. Stephanie 
Guenther and fellow classmates went to Huntersville 
prison to observe various criminological situations. 




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MAKING HERSELF COMFORTABLE. Juleigh Sitton 
settles In for one more Humanities lecture in Perkins 
Auditorium Humanities classes meet together as one 
large group for lectures. 

A BRIEF PAUSE in notetaking allows Curlin Reed to 
reflect on tfie material at hand. Students in the Human- 
ities program are encouraged to pull all the diverse mate 
rial together into one concise idea about a period of 
history. 



20 STGDENT LIFE 




If You Didn't Read About It In 

Humes . . . 



"If you enjoy reading and if you want a 
broad introduction to the interaction of ideas, 
institutions, and inventions that have contri- 
buted to Western culture as you encounter it 
today. Humanities is for you. " 

Since 1962, Davidson has offered, to al- 
most one third of the student body, a two- 
year, interdisciplinary course entitled Human- 
ities. This course, which utilizes lectures, dis- 
cussion groups, and an extensive reading list 
in order to expose students to many different 
p>oints of view, is characterized in the bro- 
chure as, "an exploration of the historical, 
religious, literary, philosophical, political, eco- 
nomic and artistic aspects of the life of West- 
ern Man." To the Humanities students them- 
selves, however, the best explanation comes 
in the form of the simple adage, "If you didn't 
read about it in Humes, it probably didn't 
happen." 

In other words, it covers just about every- 
thing. To many, this is Humanities' greatest 
flaw; it tries to cover too much too fast. The 
result, observes Professor Peter Krentz, is 



that "inevitably it is somewhat superficial, 
and the biggest danger is students thinking 
they know more in the end than they do." 
This is a valid criticism, but Professor Tony 
Abbott adds, "Humanities is designed to give 
the student a broad intellectual base, and it 
can be argued that those who have a Humes 
background will do a better job studying the 
specifics in other courses." Dr. Abbott goes 
on to praise the Davidson program, and its 
students, as a "model." He concludes, howev- 
er, that just because it is an "admired model," 
it doesn't mean that it is a model that every 
school can follow; "you need good students 
to carry it off." 

There will always be dissenting opinions as 
to the makeup of the course syllabus: what 
to include, how long to spend on each work, 
etc. One thing remains evident, however, Hu- 
manities is popular and worthwhile. A poll 
taken in 1968, and again in 1973, showed that 
of the juniors and seniors questioned, over 
ninety-three per cent "would recommend the 
program to others and would take it again if 




given the opportunity. " And its popularity 
continues to grow. This year, the ceiling was 
lifted from 119 seats to 144 in an effort to 
accomodate more of the 160 freshmen who 
designated Humanities as their first choice 
during registration. Humanities is popular be- 
cause it is recognized as a worthwhile basis 
for a liberal arts education; it forces students 
to read critically, to synthesize historical 
events and their characteristic philosophies 
and trends, and to communicate their ideas 
clearly and logically through discussion and 
essays. 

The Humanities department also encour- 
ages students to recognize the significance of 
the works and ideas explored to their every- 
day lives. Second year Humes students find 
Thoreau particularly appropriate to their Da- 
vidson situation when in Walden he explains, 
"The consequence is, that while the Human- 
ities student is reading Adam Smith, Ricardo, 
and Say, he runs his father in debt irretrieva- 
bly." 

-Tracy Thompson 



SECOrtD-YEAR VETERANS OF THE PROGRAM. John 
Eley and Dave Carpent^ discuss the preceding weeks 
lectures and readings. Discussions play a vital role in the 
Humanities Program. 

AN IMPORTANT FEATURE of the Humanities Program, 
the discussion group provides an outlet for students' 
views. Jere Roy Fuller considers the point being made. 




IN THE DOME ROOM Charlie Lovett and 143 (supposed 
ly) fellow freshman listen attentively to a lecture by one 
of the first year Humanities staff. 



Academics 21 




EXPLORING NEW MEDIUMS, swim coach Pat Miller 
doubles as a volleyball coach for the physical education 
department. 

BRUSHING UP ON GRACE AND POISE are the intent 
members of Davidson's ballet class. Both beginning and 
advanced classes are offered to students throughout the 
year. 





22 STUDENT LIFE 



students Display A Variety Of Skills 



A puzzled and thus, obviously freshman 
student, questioned a senior as to why she 
had been so exhausted spring term. 

"P.E. requirement!" came the panted re 
ply. 

This seems to be the Davidson syn- 
drome. "Put it off" is the motto of most 
students concerning the physical educa- 
tion requirement. By the time they are sen- 
iors, no one can quite believe that he or she 
is going to have to spend a required period 
of time in P.E. class. In the spring, quite a 
few of these procrastinators end up taking 
several gym classes at once. 

Yet the cruel facts remain. Every stu- 
dent at Davidson must demonstrate profi- 
ciency in three individual sports and par- 
ticipate in two team sports. There is a wide 
variety of sports offered for both jocks and 
those less athletically inclined. Swimming, 
tennis, and weight training are offered as 
well as less visible sports such as archery, 
fencing, scuba diving, ice skating, and bal- 
let. Some students even gain credit by 
teaching P.E. Diane Odom, David Evans, 
and Ann Williams taught tap dancing, clog- 
ging, and riding respectively this year. The 
riding program has been expanded this 
year and moved to the lake campus. Sail- 
ing and waterskiing are also offered there 
in fall and spring. Proficiency tests are of- 
fered in most individual sports and intercol- 
legiate and intramural sports and intercol- 
legiate and intramural sports each count 
as one team sport. .^^ji^ J^^^^ 

SEEING EYE TO EYE? So far Gus Robinson and his 
steed are still at the stage of n^utual suspicion. Getting to 
know one's horse is a major part of Davidson's Beginning 
Riding. 

VOLUNTEER TO DROWN. ANYONE? Brad Harrold 
puts into practice theories of lifesaving learned in W.S.I. 





PARTICIPANTS IN A WEIGHT TRAINING PROGRAM 
prepares Todd Kimsey to shoulder an unweildy academic 
load. 



Academics 23 



Davidson's Center For Special Studies Offers 



An Alternative To Curriculum 



The College's Center For Special Studies 
was established in the old Carolina Inn in 
1970. In the eleven years that it has been a 
part of Davidson's academic life, the center 
has encouraged study in such diverse fields 
as "The Midwestern Mind", "Control of Scien- 
tific Research", and "Individual Rights and 
State's Rights", among other even less con- 
ventional disciplines. In just over a decade, 
the Center has graduated about three hundred 
and forty students, a large part of whom have 
left Davidson with honors and have gone on 
to graduate schools in many, many fields. 



AN EXHUBERANT SPEAKER. Dr. Bob Manning is a 
member of the physics department who also teaches 
seminars through the Center. 




The programs offered by the Center for 
Special Studies are not for everybody. The 
institution's present Dean, Dr. Bliss, stresses 
that the Center is here for those students who 
find that traditional majors do not suit their 
needs or interests. "We are here to provide 
appropriate opportunities for students who 
have interests that are just a little different, " 
he said, adding that a degree from the Center 
is all impressive to some graduate schools 
that are interested in the depth of an appli- 
cant's academic commitment. 

The student enrolling at the Center for Spe- 
cial Studies designs his or her own curriculum 
with the help of a "group of sympathetic 
advisors," as Dr. Bliss puts it. On the average 
about thirty-two students work through the 
Center every year in pursuit of various singu- 
lar majors. Dr. Bliss does not believe that the 
majority of them are motivated by a desire to 
find specific jobs upon graduation. "Most of 
them are just interested in the subject," he 
reports. 

Davidson's Center For Special Studies is a 
unique concept to say the least. It offers stu- 
dents an unusual opportunity for self expres- 
sion, an advantage that most students in oth- 
er institutions never have in their educational 
experiences. 

-Mike Mason 




WHOLE-HEARTED ATTENTION and concentrated 
study are needed for intensive programs. P.J. Whit- 
lock committed herself to this study. 





^ WLm 




HHI^H ^^^^1 ^ 'k .^^.^^^^^1 K^ 




t. - ''1 



PARTICIPATING IN THE CENTER'S PROGRAMS. 

Freshman Jeff Mann took advantage of the Center's 
opportunities early: students generally do not get in- 
volved with the Center until their sophomore year. 



PERSONAL LUNCHEONS in the cozy setting of the 
Center for Special Studies building are regular func 
tions for Center majors, professors, and guests. 



AN EVEN BALANCE of discussion and lecture are 
customary for the Center seminars. Bill Appleton. John 
Richards, Tim Whalen and Elizabeth Brazell participate 
in Dr. Bob Manning's seminar. 



24 STUDENT LIFE 



Hidden Opportunities In Belk 



Located in the lower level of Belk Dorm, 
the ROTC department may seem Isolated 
from the other curriculum departments at Da- 
vidson. But it is set off for a good reason — it 
is not just another academic department. 

ROTC offers all the experience of a leader- 
ship club, a team sport, and a service club 
rolled into one neat package flavored with a 
few classes and extra training. The program 
does this primarily through student-run units 
within the department. 

One of the most important ROTC units is 
the Cadet Cadre, composed of senior cadets 
who are responsible for the training of the 
Corps of Cadets. The major weight of this 
responsibility rests on the shoulders of Batal- 
lion CO. Cdt. Ltc. David Green and Bataliion 
XO, Cdt, Maj. Jorge Silveira. Assisting them 
are David Poe as Training and Operations 
Officer, Jeff Wright as Bataliion Sgt. Major, 
and Tim Bethea as Adjudant. 

The ROCs, another unit organized for mili- 
tary career motivated cadets, provides an op- 
portunity to learn advanced skills, such as 
mountain climbing, small group tactics, land 
navigation, and first aid for virtually any situa- 
tion. 

Scabbard and Blade, a military honor soci- 
ety, honors academic achievement and spon- 
sors two blood drives, a turkey shoot, and a 
military ball over the year. 

Each of these organizations offers students 
a position in leadership and an opportunity of 
learning to work efficiently with others to- 
ward a common goal. 

The department not only offers opportuni- 
ties to the cadets within the ROTC program 
but also offers services to the rest of the 
student body. The rifle team is sponsored and 
coached by SSG. Ransom Cooper, Jr. 



In an effort to acquaint more students with 
ROTC and its programs, open-house tours are 
given during freshman orientation. The bene- 
fits of this active role taken by the depart- 
ment to meet the freshmen are reflected in a 
sixty percent increase in first year cadet en- 
rollment over last year. Like Cadet George 
Thompson who states, "I joined ROTC in con- 
sideration of the present and the future," 
more and more students are realizing how 
well ROTC can equip one for careers after 
Davidson, whether military or otherwise. 

-Lisa Sloan 

DRAWING BLOOD painlessly is a Davidson ROTC spe 
cialty. This year's blood drive set a new record for dona 
tions. Among the ROTCs working at the fall blood drive 
were Brad Perkins. Eddie Beaker, John Shaw, and Todd 
Beck. 



m 





PRECISIOM FORMATIONS characterize the proud and A TOUGH BRAD SIMPSON is initiated into ROCs. Ru 
hard-core ROCs, a group that can handle just about any mors that the pin pierces both shirt and arm are entirely 
task. false. 



26 STUDENT LIFE 




SUBMISSION TO BONDAGE precedes rappelling prac 
III . for an apprehensive volunlcer at ROTC's rappelling 
I' iii.jMitralion Freshman Mick Smith performs the pre 
hiMiniry ropetying before the long desrent is to occur 




Academics 27 



A World Of Opportunities 




A FAMILIAR POSE to many students is that in which 
Ken Wood provides leads regarding summer jobs, intern- 
ships, and career possibilities. 




"We're interested in helping individual stu- 
dents to find kinds of experiences that will 
help them develop in ways they want to de- 
velop." 

Ah, another review, another paper . . . the 
food at the house was awful tonight and I lost 
my quarter in the drink machine . . . tired of it 
all? . . . Looking for a change? . . . The Expe- 
riential Programming and Lifework Planning 
Office is where you should head. Even if one 
isn't tired of it all but just wants to explore all 
the possibilities available in a Davidson edu 
cation . . . Ken Wood; located in the base- 
ment of the (Jnion, can help. 

Ken is involved in personal development as 
opposed to academic development. He runs a 
series of workshops in which students learn 
about themselves and what careers are best 
suited to their goals and personalities. Even if 
a student already has an idea of his career 
goals, Ken can help him check them out be- 
fore graduation rolls around. During the 1979- 
80 school year, there were approximately thir- 
ty students on part-time internships in Char- 
lotte each term and roughly sixty students 
participated in various externships over the 
breaks. 

Other educational opportunities not neces- 
sarily career-related, but exposing the student 
to an environment and experience different 
from that found on the Davidson campus in- 
clude the Philadelphia Program, during which 
one spends two Davidson terms working in 
Philadelphia, the Kenya program which pro- 
vides the opportunity to teach at schools in 
Kenya for a year after graduation, and the 
National Institute of Health Program in Wash- 
ington, D.C., which offers research facilities 
and insight into medical research and testing 
techniques for a period over summer break. 

These learning exf>eriences outside David- 
son have proven both very exciting and help- 
ful to many students. Senior Walter Pharr 
spoke of his externship in Chapel Hill as a 
"tremendous opportunity to get the inside 
line on specific medical professions". Such 
insight is very helpful in planning after gradu- 
ation. 

The experiential office provides alternative 
learning to those who wish to remain at David- 
son, through seminars and weekend exper- 
iences. Seminars in 1980-81 included "Chal- 
lenges in Communication", "Challenges in 
Management", and "Resume-writing and in- 
terviewing". Some of the weekend exper- 
iences include wilderness hikes with talks em- 
phasizing self-interpretation and career devel- 
opment, and a visiting trek to several rural 
health practicioners in one Appalachian area. 



DRESSED TO IMPRESS. John Butler conducts 
like a true Davidson gentleman in this interview < 
through the experiential office. 



28 STODENT LIFE 



d 

I 



In 1980, fifty percent of the student body 
entered the job market. This is a dramatic 
change from the thirty percent just a few 
years ago. In order to meet this growing need 
for job hunting skills, the Lifework Planning 
Office has increased its efforts in career place- 
ment in collaboration with the S.G.A, and oth- 
er student groups on campus. 

The Office of Experiential Programs and 
Lifework Planning was begun by Ken Wood in 
1973. The program has matured and ex- 
panded tremendously in the last six years 
thanks to the dedicaton and enthusiasm of 
both Ken and Suzie Summers, his secretary. 

CONCERNED ABOGT THE FUTURE, Leisa Lifer gets 
some lips during an interview with Ken Wood 



Hot only has the program grown but so has 
Ken in his alternative lifestyle. He tries to 
practice what he preaches and is thus pres- 
ently restoring an old house and experiment 
ing with a solar greenhouse and an organic 
garden, as well as just completing a book, in 
collaboration with two Davidson graduates, 
called "Creatively Muddling Throught Life 
and Work". 

So, if you're looking for a change, a little 
direction in your life ... or just want some 
new ideas, go on down, talk with Ken . . . and 
be prepared to get excited about a lot of possi 
bilities you never knew came with the pack 
aged Davidson deal. 

•Lisa Sloan 



HEIPING THE MENTALLY HANDICAPPED proves j 
rewarding experience tor junior John Rees Many stu 
dents arrange such internships in Charlotte through 
Kens office 






IN A GROUP SESSION Ken Wood points out a numtier 
of options to Aaron Rollins and others. 



Academics 29 



JYA GERMANY: C,K. Nichols. Bob Doares, Stokes Pee- 
bles, Dan Barker, Marilyn Kaylor, Trudy Ortheil, Jerome 
Hay, Tandy Gilliland, Susan Roberts, Steve Nagy, Alan 
Zugschlag. 




4^'-¥ 




J YA— Making The Scene 'Over There' 



"Now that I'm settled I get two showers a 
week!! I think I'm gonna be pretty interna- 
tional by the time I get home." 

"Last weekend we went to Tours, France 
and saw the Loire Valley and Chateaux. It 
was so beautiful. On the way back we dis- 
covered that no trains were running, so, 
guess what we did? We stuck out our 
thumbs!" 

"I'm working on my research project (hu- 
mic acids) with one of the foremost experts 
in Germany. I'm also running track for a club 
team here." 

"I heard some American songs on the ra- 



ONEXPECTED CONDITIONS confront JYA Montpellier 
student Cordelia Crampton daily as she experiences life 
in France 




FRAMED AGAINST THE COLD MARBURG SKYLINE. 

Jeronne Hay and C.K. Nichols stop during a mid January 
walk in Germany 

JYA FRANCE: Joe Ford, Cindy Chavez, Bob Gould, Cor 
delia Crampton, Lynn McClintock, Richard Strader, Alice 
Musick, Newton Allen. 



dio yesterday. I almost fell off my chair when 
I heard the Brothers Gibb singing 'Staying 
Alive!" 

"We stayed in this hotel in London where 
you have to put five pence in a little heater 
every time you wanted an hour of heat. We 
were kind of chilly most of the time." 

"We arrived at the train station looking 
like tired, wet rats. The families looked us 
over like we were at an auction! Eventually 
everybody got matched up and 1 went home 
with a really nice family. They speak no Eng- 
lish but are very patient and feed me well." 

The above quotations are ail extracted 
from "letters home" from students who are 
taking advantage of Davidson's JYA pro- 
grams. Davidson offers year-long programs In 
Marburg, West Germany, Montpelller, France 
and at the Universities at East Anglia and 
Redding In Britain. The France and Germany 



programs are the most popular at DavldsoD 
and offer the opportunity to study at a large 
university. A few minutes with almost any 
past "JYAer" Is enough to convince almost 
anyone of the merits of going abroad. 

A final note — don't worry at>out your 
friends losing that Davidson "quest for knowl- 
edge" while abroad. From a pre-med in Ger- 
many: 

"I have finally gotten a laboratory space 
and will start after Christmas with determina- 
tions of the spectra, potentrometric titration 
curves, and structure of fulvlc acids — a low 
molecular weight, HCL soluble ..." 

-Katie Tully 




Acadmics 31 



'A Gift Of Freedom' Seen From Afar 



Dear Quips and Cranks, 

I understand you'd like to print a few brief 
accounts of impressions and experiences ac- 
quired by those of us spending our junior year 
in Germany. 

Specific experiences would be easy enough 
and fun to relate, but I think this occasion 
might be better used to attempt to convey the 
more general and significant qualities of a 
year out of the Davidson tower and out of the 
American backyard. 

Let me go back three years when as a high 
school senior prospecting among colleges. I 
read in a University bulletin some moving 
remarks on the exciting opportunities and 
challenges of the coming college years which 
concluded with the golden words, "you will 
never be this free again." After two years of 
putting in proper academic fashion the fruits 
held out by a course of study in the liberal 
arts and enjoying the pleasures and rewards 
of life in a small college community I didn't, in 
full cognizance of the facts of life, come to 
doubt this distinguished academician's word, 
but I nonetheless felt compelled to ask. "isn't 
it possible, before taking my diploma in hand, 
to be for a while just a bit freer? " Now here I 
am navigating the treacherous waters, for Da- 
vidson has no dearth of opportunities for 
stretching the mind. body, and soul, meeting 
talented people and just generally enjoying 
oneself. If, however, the goal of our college is 
to provide an experience which liberates and 
disciplines, may ! respectfully suggest that at 
certain points of certain lives the experience 
may be less than the sum of its parts. 

Very few would deny the penchant of disci- 
pline for hamming the academic act and 
crowding liberation right off stage, and maybe 
fewe.r are aware of the more insidious danger 
of selling liberation's part to expediency — or 
they are fully aware of it and just don't care. 
The dedica'^'rl actor in this th'^atre could easi 



ALTERNATE LIFESTYLES creep into the lives of David 
son Students studying abroad. David Rowe. Mike Cooper. 
Stokes Peebles. C.K. Nichols, and Jerome Hay pass the 
time in the laid-back manner of the Europeans. 




32 STUDENT LIFE 



ly feel like a balloon trying to inflate itself in a 
shoe box. 

A semester in a large European university 
has been a needed intermission and a stimu- 
lating third act which fit my educational plot 
perfectly. My time abroad has provided me 
the opportunity for catharsis and catechism 
away from the cultural chorus of home and 
the relentless pressures, mostly self-imposed, 
of the ordinary academic life. 

We have found the students here at Phi- 
lipps (Jniversitant more serious yet more re- 
laxed than our companions at home. There is 
a lack of the harriedness that can creep into 
life at Davidson but a lamentable lack of lev- 
ity as well. Life here is an interesting and 
refreshing change, and a provider of new in- 
sights and an illuminator of old qualities taken 
for granted. 

Out of the fourteen-thousand students 
here, one thousand are foreigners, mostly 
from developing countries. Hearing their eco- 
nomic and political plights first-hand is a so- 
bering experience and impresses one with the 
awesome influence the United States can and 
does wield over their lives. The accounts of 
foreign travelers in America and film docu- 
mentaries on our society can amuse, embar- 
rass, dismay, and anger the American looking 
at his pond from another shore and in differ- 
ent company, but the general disillusionment 
of the first few months were joined soon by a 
rising awareness and appreciation of the 
many aspects of American society which are 
in this world uniquely positive or simply 
uniquely American. These are not unimpor- 
tant things to discover. 

JYA has also been the chance to truly learn 
another language and through it the nuances 
of one's own; it's been the chance to study 
Soviet history with a professor who speaks 
Russian and was full of anecdotes from his 
several extended travels in the GSSR; it's 
been invitations from professors of three 
seminars I've visited to drink beer in celebra- 
tion of the semester's end: it's been following 
world affairs and cultural currents in Ameri- 
can, British, and German magazines: it's been 
watching the election returns — and German 
reactions — in the Embassy Club in Bonne; 
it's been taking off for a weekend to see the 
King Tut exhibit in Cologne and for a week 
with a Foreign Student Seminar on German 
politics in Berlin which, of course, left time for 
philharmonic concerts and museums, bars 
and cabarets, and the experience of East Ber 
lin and the Wall; it's been talking with Pales 
tinians about the Israelis, with Iranians about 
the Shah and the Ayatollah, with Ugandans 
about Amin; it's not all politics either, for one 
of us it's been the chance to work on an 
independent chemistry project with highly so- 
phisticated equipment; it's been the chance 
to push German aside every now and then 



and walk down to the lovely Kennedy Library 
and read books auf Englisch to one's heart's 
content; it's been playing with the local rugby 
club or learning how to ski. Of course JYA is 
also two months of incredible travel opportu- 
nities between the semesters. In short, study 
abroad can be what one makes of it: A gift of 
freedom and an array of new challenges 
which can bring an invigorating new modula- 
tion into the rhythm of one's education and 
indeed, one's own life. 

"One of Us" 



TRYING TO ORIENT THEMSELVES m a new city Dan 
Barker and Steve "Nagy ask directions of two of Ge: 
many's most solid citizens. 




DIVIDED LOYALTIES piaqur- i.- -V: • 
posts Davidson memorabilia on her apartr 
France 




TIRED FEET get a lift after a long day. Stokes Peebles. 
Dan Barker, and Jerome Hay lend support to Tandy 
Gilliland and ^rilyn Kaylor in tfie streets of Marburg. 



j^ri 



Academics 33 



KA 101 



A Great Course To Take 



Our 101st year at Davidson was our most 
successful year ever. Our cooks, Mildred and 
Sylvia, prepared unquestionably, the best 
food on the court. With the leadership of 
President Doug Shanks, Vice-President Turley 
Howard, and Secretary Hugh Crenshaw, the 
chapter was very successful with its rush, 
social, and social services programs. Rush 
Chairman Hill Stockton brought in 32 of the 
best freshmen on campus, which will lead to 
the continued greatness of the chapter. The 
packed social calendar ended with the tradi- 
tional celebration of Old South. Despite a 
small controversy, with the Black Student 
Coalition, the weekend went as scheduled, 
filled with the excitement of an evening barn 
dance, an afternoon full of activities at a near- 
by plantation, and a dance on the final even- 
ing. In social services, KA held its semi-annua 
charity disco to benefit Muscular Dystrophy 
cause. Other community services, such as 
crushing glass, were also undertaken. 

Campus wide leadership by KA brothers 
was at a higher level than ever. The SGA 
presidency was again captured by a 
Kappa Alpha brother. Chip Legerton will hold 
the position for the 1981-82 school year. In 
addition, the Senior, Junior, and Freshmen 
class presidents were held by brothers Ron 
Davis, Eric Crum, and George Thompson, re- 
spectively. In academic endeavors, brothers 
Hugh Crenshaw, Rhett Thompson and Pete 



Jordan were chosen Phi Beta Kappa. Hugh 
also received the prestigious Watson Fellow 
ship, while Rhett received a graduate fellow- 
ship at Emory University. In athletics, the top 
three ranked tennis players were all KA's. 
KA's were also represented on the football, 
wrestling, baseball, and track teams. Our 
Rose, Lisa Harbottle was chosen Homecom- 
ing Queen. 

While positions won and honors received 
are individual in nature, they contribute to the 



overall unity of a thriving and successful 
brotherhood. At Kappa Alpha, each of the 
brothers adds an integral part to the group as 
a whole, which makes it more than just an 
eating house; it's a fraternity! 

Charles Douglas & Elliott Stotler 



DOMN THE HANKY PANKY Gordon Turnbull 

dances on stage with the band, at the KA Midwinter's 
Party. 




KAPPA ALPHA; (Front Row) Mark Murray, Elliott Stotlec, Chris Tiernan, 
Alec Dnskell, Pal McKinsey, Jaime King (Second Row) Chuck Hasty. New 
man YielcJing, Eric Crum, Chris Culp. Marc Fields, Charles Douglas, Andy 
Zoutewelle. Glenn Simpson, Norwood Smith, Russ Williams, Doug Shanks, 
Robert Thatcher, Paul Griflith, Ellis Tinsley, Danny Sappentield, Dave 
Bfuns, Sherman Allen, Randy Sellers. Bill Satterwhile. Brian Hamilton, Nick 



34 STUDENT LIFE 





TREE-MENDOaS FUN: Merris Hollingsworth and Tim 
Ritchie participate in the festivities at the Christmas tree 
decorating party. 

WIMTER MELODY MAKERS. Chris Culp, Susan Knott. 
Elliot Stotler. Renee Thompson. Susan Culp and Charles 
Douglas swing to the music. 



Patterson Court 35 



Salad Sisters' Myth Exploded At Last 



What can we tell you about Rusk House 
that you don't already know, or that the Brick 
Brothers haven't told you in the Davidsonian? 
Rusk takes pride in being the first sorority at 
Davidson, and our meals are unique. For 
breakfast we have tossed salad. Lunch is a 
smorgasbord of tuna salad, egg salad, and 
just plain salad. Dinner is really special with a 
super salad bar. Boring? Well, maybe, but we 
have to watch our weight so we can get dates. 
But, all we get is offers from Davidson guys 
who want to take us out in G-Hauls and put 
bags on our heads! 

Descending back into the realms of reality, 
away from these misleading — but funny — 
stereotypical stories. Rusk House is the only 
all-female eating house on Patterson Court. 
We take pride in being a very diverse group 
with the common bond of friendship. As for 
our meals, we do enjoy our salads, but, quite 
frankly, "make your own ice cream sundae " 
is much more popular than "make your own 
salad." 

Rusk has had a busy year with a variety of 
events. During fall and winter terms we were 



under the efficient leadership of Sally Meal, 
who was assisted by our "good buddy " Lisa 
Hasty. Carla Pezzulo and Alison Lewis 
planned our great meals while Renee Hedge 
peth kept our house in working order. Betsy 
Thomas was our personal banker, and Wendy 
Smith and Rebecca Cross planned all Rusk's 
Social functions. 

We had a band party in the fall with the 
DYNAMIC UPSETTERS and a Valentine's 
Dance with SEVENTH OF MAY. Everyone 
remembers Sally Meal's recreation of "Rusk- 
stock." We also had several mixers through- 
out the school year — champagne with SAE 
(you gotta love 'em), a cook-out with the gen- 
tlemen of KA, a zombie party with PIKA, and 
a cock-out and musical chairs party with Phi 
Delts. Winter term was topped off with a wel- 
come party for the new freshmen members 
with champagne and the Rusk tradition of 
table-top dancing. 

With spring term came new officers and 
lots more parties. Shannon "Big Mama " Wal 
ters was elected to the presidential seat with 
her right-hand woman, Mebane Atwood. Cin- 



der Mebane's supervision, we had a carnival 
for the children of Davidson as part of Town 
Day. 

Betsy dropped our money into the hands of 
wild and crazy Ginny Morrow, and went on to 
become our competent house manager. And, 
if you noticed that Rusk girls put on weight 
spring term, its because of "Knox-Anne " 
Douglas and her dessert menus. 

Thanks to two "groovey" girls, Lanier 
Brown and Katie Tully, we had an active so 
cial life in the spring. They brought us conser- 
vative parties like "Midnight Madness " and 
the "Suitcase Party " that sent Rhett Thomp- 
son and Kim McAlister to Myrtle Beach for 
the weekend. We went ice-skating with blind 
dates and took a trip to Hampden Sydney for 
a mixer. We topped off the year with our 
annual Hawaiian Luau at the lake and a band 
party afterwards with STEPS. 

What else can we tell you about Rusk? 
Perhaps Edith Parker says it best "Rusk 

House — the house with the most " 

-Shannon Walters 



^«\ 




36 STUDENT LIFE 




APPARENTLY TESTING THE DISHWATER. Lanier 
Brown pdu!>e!> while unpacking the house crystal 



RUSK: (Fifsl tow) Calhy Duma;. Lisa Harboltle, Caty Campbell, Sheiburne 


Joyce Robinson, Laura Lacy, Elizabeth Williams. Mary Carp(?nlei Arabellj 


laughlin Patty Balrs EVisy Thomas Mary Eliiabelh Cianford, Gmny Mor 


Malone. Margaret West (Fourth row) Edilh Parker, Mary Windham, Ann 


(ow Pally Long. Lanirr Brown (Srtond row) True Davis. Margaret Holt, 


Walcolt. Peggy Britl. Kirby Owen, Agnes hortleet, Caria Pe/iulo Kathy 


Reavrs Robinson, Laura Curry Rebecca Cross. Ridgely Medlin, McNair 


Boylston, Carolyn Barnett. Debby Carlton, Lisa Hasty, Debbie Marshdll 


Helm Cane Nunn, Anne Hockelt. Sandy Fossetl, Carol Heppner, Kalie Tully. 


Alison Lewis. Wanda Langley, Shera Alfofd, Amy Robinson, Lena Crawley 


Adelaide Wikon (Third row) Mary Frye, Merris Hollingsworth, Laura Petrou, 


Lisa Olson, Elizabeth Medlin, Cathy Inabnet, Barbara Boyce, Kalhy Adkins, 


Sue Buchanan, Kim McAlister Leslie Mills, Mebane Atwood, Marni Crosby, 


Anne Keilh, Sally Meal, Denise Ferguson, Follin Smith 











CERTS: IT KEEPS ON WORKING even when the Luau 
IS over, so hope James Baskin and date Joyce Robinson, 



THE HIGHLIGHT OF ANY RUSK MEAL: Diners Cane 
Nunn and Lisa Draine hunger for their house's No. 1 
attraction: salad 



Patterson Court 37 




SHRIMPEROO! Rocky Stone and Dewayne Jimlson help 
themselves at PAX's Spring Frolics Shrimp Dinner. 

38 STUDENT LIFE 



PAX Parties On Despite Subdued Image 



Newsbrief: 

PAX . . a quiet eating house . . with a 
subdued atmosphere? — not so! 

Here's Warren Overbey, PAX VicePresi 
dent, to tell us why 

"After welcoming everyone back to school, 
we started the year off with cocktail parties 
and study breaks including banana splits, ba- 
gels, and popcorn. For Homecoming, we con- 
verted PAX into the PAX Pub serving mixed 
drinks and beer. Other activities for Home 
coming included a special dinner, a late night 

WALL TALK: John Spangler dnd Jeb Benedict on the 
Pax pdtio 



cocktail party, and a disco IMAC flickerball 
was also part of the fall agenda 

During the winter term, our cocktail parties 
and study breaks continued. One notable par- 
ty was our Election Might party-we served 
"Republican" and "Democrat" specialty 
drinks, and got rowdy watching the election 
returns. Also along the same line were our 
Margarita and Pina Colada parties on Friday 
afternoons. Our Midwinters program includ 
ed an authentic French dinner, followed later 
in the evening by a Zombie party with souve- 
nir glasses, and on Saturday, a champag- 
ne/orange-juice brunch. We also hosted a 
band party featuring "Clockwork" that was 



enjoyed by many. 

Spring term, our activities included IMAC 
Softball and volleyball, cookouts, volleyball 
and Sangria parties, and study breaks. New 
members, along with our social members, 
participated in these activities." 

Thanks. Warren. — and that's the story on 
PAX. a coed eating house with sixty-three 
members under the direction of Mike Healy. 
President; Warren Overbey. Vice President; 
and Bruce Wallace. Treasurer. Caryn Hoskins 
served as social manager, and Ricky Watson, 
as house manager. 

-Warren Overbey 




P^ 




COOKING UP A STORM. Carolyn Scott. Caryn Hoskins 
and Warren Overbey preparing Shrimp and hushpuppies 
for the Spring Frolics dinner party. 



PAX: {Ffont Ro»| Russ Snipn. Mike Allan Karrie Buckner Warren Overby 
RoM»e S.ngl«on, R.cky Waison (Second Row) Barb Cape. Sieve Lawrence 
Hal Lteyd. Parks Snead. Caryn Hoskins. Nan ZimmerrT>an Carolyn Scolt 
■[>^ Sirawser. Cindy Chave;. David Rhodes (Third Rowl Mike Healy, Pele 

"Wuj. John Soangler. Bob Palten. Tom Marshburn Rod Hannah Chrislly ,.. , 

Moossall, Ed Harlan. Susan Eghn David Simpson Peter Culyn. Sieve Rowe, Bryan Collins. Bobby Ervin. 



Lewis. Craig Adams (Fourlh Row) John McDoruld. Brenl Hilleary. Ronnw 
Con, Rocky Slone. Brad Cors. Jim Reese. Charles Cales (Fifth Row) Rusty 
Underwood, Jim Hooten. Walter Lee. Dewayne Jimison, Feli» Gerdes. Mike 
Mason, Joe Jernigan (Back Row) Dave Boone. John McCormick. Mark 
Sheffield Kathryn Brown. Becky Lane. Colin Brown Drew Davis. David 
Wallace 



Patterson Court 39 




INOM: IFionl Row) Dale Wilhtow. Milzi Short, John Chung (Sec 
I Wilson Sodey, Joyce Hoffman, Matiha Anne Whitmore, Jeff Jordan 
ia lies, Weei.e Mann, Joanna Fleming, Julia PIdgeon, Cindy Clark. Eric 
(Third Row) Anna Phipps Ant Goode, Jayne Ransom, Daniel Ettedgui 
I Fleming, Elarbara Kelly, Debbie Melzger, Lisa Robinson, Carol Hoopes 
le Brown, Bill Wilson, Keith Hearle, John Miller Mayfield (Fourth Row 
1 Rees. Paul Mainella, Sara Wheeler, Sarah Mumy, Karen Welty, Kalhy 



f Hoffman. Kim Hewlett, Pat Stuart, Lisa Herard, Hal Martin, Ann Parker. Jon 

1, Glance, George Webster, Phil Per Lee, Lee Ann Stackhouse, Mark Gillespie. 

c Betty Eborn, Jim Brown, Bob Buchanan, Doug Austin, Ron Tunkte, Albert 

I, Nester, John Robbins, Michael Kelly, Greg Kaufman, Craig Rice (Last Riw) 

Cynthia Baron, Katherine Christie, Stuart Tinkler. Jim Bailey, Harriet HoL 

shuijsen. Rick Jenkins, Terry Marrow, Frank Myers, Jim Troutman, Eric 

_ong. John McJunkin 




40 STUDENT LIFE 



Adventures In Eating And Entertainment 



Dinner while sitting on the floor? . . . how 
else would you eat Chinese food? Oh, 

with chopsticks? well, we had those too. 

A few weeks later, members filed in for 
another international dinner, but this time we 
had spoons, and we ate our English Christ 
mas pudding and sang carols at the piano. 

Emanon's activities were certainly diverse 
to say the least. 

Biweekly, an international dinner commit 
tee, in coordination with our wonderful cooks, 
Odessa and Gerdie, prepared delectable din- 
ners from around the world. Some of the 
more popular menus were French, Greek, 
Spanish (complete with pinata), and Dutch 
(coordinated by our Dutch foreign exchange 
student, Harriet Holshuijsen). 

Other menu variations included pizza from 
LaStrada's, steak nights, a Ronald Reagan 
Roast, and a big splurge seafood feast. 




On Friday nights when the folks of Emanon 
weren't eating something special, they were 
most likely drinking something special. Week 
ly cocktail parties proved liberating — at 
least more napkins were thrown at unsuspect 
ing friends. 

Every Wednesday night, Emanon put out 
tubs of ice cream for members and guests to 
come and test their will power or rather 

lack thereof. 

After midterm crunches, members often 
felt the need to get away from campus. Win- 
ter term found us together skiing the Morth 
Carolina slopes while Spring found us walking 
the South Carolina sands. 

In addition to entertaining its members, 



Emanon also provided campus entertainment 
with several band parties and discos. 

As in the previous year, the student interest 
in joining Emanon was fantastic. After accept- 
ing 25 new freshmen, we unfortunately had to 
place 38 on a waiting list. 

Bill Wilson as President coordinated all 
Emanon business with the aid of Hope 
McArn, Vice-President, and Keith Hearle, 
Treasurer. 

John Miller Mayfield and Lisa Sloan 



VISITING ALUMNUS Gregg Londry 80 and the beaming 
John Miller Mayfield enjoy Homecoming aclivilies 




THE CHARLOTTE OBSERVER serves as a chic table 
cloth for Emanon's seafood dinner during Midwinters. 
Here Joyce Hoffman gouges her food contently. 

INTERNATIONAL STGDENT Harriet Holshuijsen fin- 
ishes off her beer at Spring Frolics and is t>eginning to 
finish off her cup! 



Patterson Court 41 



BEWARE OF THE LEGS OF LONG. Karen Long 
and alumnus Paul Kirk participate in ATO's annu- 
al performance of Tfie Ides of Marchi in the library 
lobby 

CUCKOO AND TRUMPS. Michelle Creel doesn't 
ruffle her feathers as she counts her points during 
a hand of bridge at the Halloween Night party. 




CHRISTMAS IS REMEMBERING. Joke gifts were ex 
changed at the ATO Christmas party, Lester Robinson 
anxiously unwraps the stuffing in his stocking. 

HEARTACHE OF MANGE is what Jeff Dempsey finds 
for himself under the Christmas tree. 



42 STUDENT LIFE 




We Know What Goes On 



Down At ATO 



What we at ATO have learned this year; 

1. That cutting out dessert does not save 
money, because people just start eating 
more cereal; 

2. That a two-ton refrigerator should not be 
placed in front of all of one's three-pronged 
electrical outlets; 

3. That it takes sound from the KA house 
longer to get here than it does from the 
SAE house; 

4. That if you put out some old beef stew with 
the ice cream, about one out of five fresh 
men will use it for topping; 

5. That the chance of someone coming down 
to the house at 3:00 AM increases in direct 
proportion to the fervor of the physical 
activity being carried on there; 

6. There is no number six; 

7. That nobody really eats spiced apples — 
they are probably a holdover from man's 
more primitive states; 

8. That no matter how many different kinds of 
leftovers go into the open kitchen refrigera- 
tor, in three days you will not be able to tell 
one from the next; 

9. That consumption from the open kitchen 
refrigerator decreases by half if the icebox 
light bulb is replaced by a blue one; 

10. That chocolate eclairs are probably the 
surest way to incite a riot in any situation; 

1 1. That you never know how big a mess you 
can make until you have made it (Lydia). 

•John Hartman 



ATO: (First Row) Joanna (JoWanna) Hunt. Beth (not 
Susan) Davidson. Julie (Nuke em) Gibert- (Second Row) 
Ann (Gibert) Sheaffer. Sheri (Cult Figure) Gravett, Resa 
(Burger) Snnith. Whitlow (Whitch) Wampler. (Third Row) 
Jeff (Pie Face) Herrin. Michelle (Crane) Creel. Elizabeth 
(Martyr) Brazell. Brett (Space) Logan, Todd (Punk) Swof- 
ford. Karen (Sch) Long. (Fourth Row) Brad (Briefcase) 
Simpson. Lorin (not Eric) Roskos. Tim (Gibert) Newcomb. 
James (Baby) Baskin. Mary Ann (Guava) Gelly. Ivy (Hula 



Hoop) Goodman, Howard (Howie) Browne. Ed (Beatnik) 
Trumbull, David (Bridge) Aldridge, Linda (Queen of 
Hearts) Hulburt, Jeff Hamilton, Masai Asu. (Last Row) 
Jim (SPE) Brown, Tim (Nuke the) Whalen. Tom (T.R.) 
Roth, Dean (Critter) Marshall. Paul (Piano Man) Ward. 
Beth (Hands) Toler. Ralph (Chicken Bones) Lasley. Bill 
(Tech) Bankhead. Bert (Jeff) Dempsey. Leif (Cereal) 
Johnston, Eddie (As was) Aziz. Lindsay (Bendsy) Biddle. 
(Not Pictured) Paul Q. Lazarro. 



Patterson Court 43 



IMPORT INVESTIGATIOM? John Butler takes an aerial 
view of the crowd as he singles out the imports at the 
SAE First Night Back Party 

BLACK JACK FIEND Lisa Ballantyne reassures David f* 
Evans after demolishing him at the Black Jack Table. 





SAEs Serve More Than Just Drinks 



The SAE fraternity is most prestigious 
around campus for Its parties, whether they 
tie band, disco . . whatever . . . they are 
numerous. However, what the rest of the cam 
pus doesn't realize Is that the SAEs are inter- 
ested in a lot more than just social gatherings. 
Their community involvement probably sur 
passes most of the other houses on the court 
as they visit the Huntersvllle Nursing Home 



ANY EXCUSE FOR A PARTY, election day notwith 
ilanding. David Evans and Jeff Ray do not seem too 
upset by the results of the election while John Thompson 
Jives the Republicans a "thumbs up " 



every other week. Among fund raising activi 
ties, they raised over $2,000 for muscular 
dystrophy In their annual bikea thon. 
Through a calendar selling drive led by Steve 
Carter, they presented the college library with 
a gift in excess of S3,000 for the rare book 
fund. Such accomplishments required much 
time and effort and no doubt the SAE broth 
ers were kept very busy . . . but not too busy 
for some fun. 

We began the year with a "First Might Back 
Party," followed by a champagne party, a 
Meredith mixer, another first night back party 
after fall break, a casino party . . . the list 
goes on ... a wine and cheese party, a tacky 




SAE: iFroot Row) Philip Gordon, Porter Rhoton. Mark Blackman (Second 
^o- I J C Faulkner, John Butler, Chns Daniels, Pat Shendan, Jeff Kane, Cliff 
Trilxjs (Third Row) Hayne rHeisler, Rob Moore, Shawn Stafford, L D Sim 
Jnons, Chip Hoover, David Carr, John Mann, Phil Goodnow (Fourth Row) 
^'^ Webster, Kevtn Whe^tocK, P.ul Bayr,ard, Al Baldw.n. Tom Mar..n 
J^nCam. (F.fih Ro*) Sam Ouiten. Edwm Smt.h. Buc 



s Bradberry. Vancy 



Carter (Sixth RowJ Bill Kir^, Dean Jones. Mark Elmore, Hall Barrwtt 
(Seventh Row) John Thompson, David Evans, Victor Taylor. Blaine Sanders, 
Jeff Ray, Dan Newsome (Last Row) Gus Robinson, Mark Shogry. Bill 
Pureed, Marshall Dent, Andrew McDonald, Rick Gaines. Chip Christian. 
Arxly Engh, Krxjx Kerr, Ttm Loreruer^. Tony Smith. Pete Collins, Rusly 
Colechia. Joby Merlon 



party, a shampoo mixer with fourth Rich, a 
Senior dance, and finally a Spring Banquet. 
When asked to recount some of the fond 
memories of the past year, Rob Moore had 
these words to say, "The year holds many 
happy memories for the members of SAE, 
memories which will Influence them well Into 
the future." 

This fraternity was supported by two bo- 
dies of officers. During the fall Blaine Sanders 
acted as president, Mark Shogry as vice-presi- 
dent, Tim Lorenzen as treasurer, David Evans 
as social chairman, and Steve Carter as ser- 
vice co-ordinator. Elected during winter term, 
Burton Vance replaced Sanders as president, 
Kevin Wheelock as vice-president, Jim Elliott 
as social chairman, and Buck Bradberry as 
service coordinator. These Individuals pro- 
vided the strong backbone necessary for the 
very active SAE fraternity. 

-Lisa Sloan 



TACKILY DRESSED, Andy -Stork' McDonald gives a 
tacky expression of ecstasy at the annual Tacky Party. 




Organizations 45 



Jocks Jockey For New Pledges 



Every college campus has its preps, its 
dogs and its library rats, and every campus 
must have its Animal House. Davidson's is on 
the far side of Patterson Court. It goes by the 
name of Phi Delta Theta, and comes complete 
with empty beer cans, the traditional Roman 
Orgy and, of course, the Animals. Although 
the fraternity has long had the reputation for 
beer guzzling and wild partying, the house has 
been determined this year to change its image 
somewhat. This intention, coupled with the 
fraternity's worsening financial situation, led 
the brothers to formulate a plan of action. 

The house has tradtionally drawn its mem- 
bership from a limited pool, namely the foot- 
ball team. As a result, it has always been a 
relatively small group. This year about fifty 
Phi Delts stormed the campus after breaking 
training. With this year's rise in food prices 
and maintenance costs, the elite group has 
begun to feel the pinch even more than other 
houses on the court. Since the only way to 
assure financial stability is to raise member- 
ship, the Phi Delts have begun a plan to diver- 
sify the group. This year's pledge class num- 
bered nineteen and, while the emphasis was 
still on athletics, it included soccer players 
and "some regular students." In a bold move, 
next year the Phi Delts will open the house to 
non-fraternity members with a special board 
and social plan. This year the brothers sent 
out open invitations to the college community 
and were elated with their success when 
twenty non-brothers signed up for the plan, 



including several coeds. Rush chairman Billy 
Price stressed the fact that Phi Delta Theta 
will remain a fraternity in spite of the open 
house membership. Since most of those who 
signed up for board and social are already 
familiar faces at the house. Price doesn't for- 
see any tension between the two groups. A 
symbiotic relationship is more the order of the 
day. 

In keeping with its financial concerns, fund- 
raising characterized the Phi Delt activities 
this past year. Members sold posters, T-shirts, 
football jerseys (naturally), and hats, while an 
active pledge class sponosred Pie Assassina- 
tions. An Air Guitar Contest was well attend- 
ed; two groups were enthused to the point of 
entering a similar competition in Charlotte, in 
which they both reached the semi-finals. On 
the party circuit, the Phi Delts concentrated 
on open parties rather than the mixers many 
other fraternities seemed to think so highly of. 
The Roman Orgy and Halloween Party were 
two of the more memorable events. In athlet- 
ics, the house swept up Greek Week activities 
for the ninth year running. In house elections 
held during the spring, Mitch Shirley handed 
the Presidency over to Mike lordanou. 
"Greek " vacated the Vice-Presidency, which 
was filled by junior Gary Sims. 

-Karen Welty 



POTTING ON AIRS: Robbie Thornsberry and Frank Ca 
pella compete in the annual Phi Delt. Air Guitar Contest. 










im^ jf ^^y^ 



i 



PHI DELTA THETA: (Front Row) Todd Lambert, Mark 
Fahey, Dana Bolton, Clarence Delforge. David Hoskins. 
Pat Pope. Vince Parker. Ben McCall. Mitch Shirley, Herm 
Lowe. Atmire Bailey (Second Row) Gary Sims. Micky 
Dillon. John Vassos. Joe Leman. Andy Leeper. Cliff 



Jim Hughes. Brent Baker. Brian Whitmire. Dan Blood. 
Jim Hoskins. Billy Price, Derek Lee. Wayne Paymer. 
Bryan Lowe. Andy Rock. Craig Binkley (Back Row) Mark 
Hartman. Brown Patterson. Bill Wahl. Bill Miller. Bill 
McFadyen. Stratton Sterghos. Warner Hall. William Hoi 




rXXX 



Woodward. Kenny Hovet, Frank Capella, Nick Nicolette, loman. Wade Anderson. Danny Robinson. Lance' Sisco. 
Bill Chater, Nelson Westerhout (Third Row) Tom Okel. Tate Nichols. Keith Martin. Mick Smith. 
Tommy Kirk. Mike Smith. John Harden. David Hoskins. 

46 STUDENT LIFE 




MOD MADNESS paid off for Bryan Lowe. Dave 
Hoskins and Bill McFadyen, as Pfii Delta won the Greek 
Week Head Ball Contest 




Patterson Court 47 




VIRTUE CONSORTS SHAMELESSLY WITH SIN: Rec PATIO POSEURS Kent Jamison. Kathy Cantwell. Paul 
tor Rufus Westervelt and gangster escort Dave Riopel Schultz and David Shoemaker line up along the F & M 

wall before dinner. 





A WIDE SMILE from Pam Rew. snapped at the open t>eer 



48 STUDENT LIFE 



Fun & Madness Reaches New 
Heights At F & M 



snoo (snoo), v.t., to plunge an unwilling, un 
witting individual into a particular mudhole, 
stinkplt. watergulley type ravine; an F & M 
phenomenon (eg., We must snoo Lisa Brown, 
because she forgot to wear her b a today.) 

Although a variety of unmentionable 
pseudonyms have developed over the years, 
F & M gets Its name from the cooks Fannie 
and Mable whose delicious fried chicen has 
topped the list of the amazing and sometimes 
questionable delectables which have graced 
Davidson tables for decades. With the closing 
of the 1980-81 school year, Mable finishes her 
28th year of Patterson Court service and Fan 
nie marks up forty years of catering to hungry 
students. On alumni weekends. Kappa Sigs 
(defunct as of 1968) stop by F & M In order to 
introduce their families to these famous 
cooks. Even current hungry, hurried crowds 
pause in the midst of particularly savory 
meals and recognize the cooks' expertise with 
a round of applause. As further tribute this 
year, a retirement fund was started for Fannie 
and Mable. 

Elbowto-elbow and cheektocheek, F & 
M'ers crowd the tables and attack their food 
with a zest rarely found among creatures of 
the human persuasion. Murph (Michael Mur- 
phy) may even stop to shed a few layers of his 
multilayer protection against the cold before 
he joins the onslaught. The rare petite coed 
approaches the table with apprehension — 
particularly if seats remain only at the Animal 
Table. At this table, eating is a serious task. 
Trob (Bob Trobich) and Palasak (Joe Palasak) 
eye each other over remaining portions, and 
when the throw is complete, vice-like jaws 
close over its tasty prize. 

The school year 1980-81 was a year of big 
events at F & M. In the first place, Rufus (Ruth 
Ann Westervelt) moved out of the president's 
chair. Spring term brought a quiet air to F & 
M as we no longer had Rufus' melodious, 
raucous voice to lead the announcements. 
Secondly, Smiley, our dear old retarded, dirty, 
smelly, lovable mutt of a dog, finally went to 
that great puppy farm in the sky. The loss 
was met with great mourning and some kind 
of crazy funeral service. Last, but not least, 
snoo-hole conditions fell to desperate levels 
with the establishment's attempts to improve 
campus appearances. At one time, the F & M 
snoohole offered the epitome of a stinky, 
stagnant, infested water hole. With campus 
construction, however, the snoo-hole became 
little more than a stinky, stagnant, infested 
mudhole. Snooing continues to provide either 
entertainment or misery to the participating F 
& M'ers. 

F & M parties offered still another source of 
enrichment throughout 1980-81 ("Joni, do 
you really want to have a party every week 
end?"). At Homecoming, Joni Seehorn repre- 



sented F & M, and the shrimp dinner after the 
game was tremendous. Winter term brought 
the Speakeasy with special high-kicking en- 
tertainment from Brenda, Pam, Melissa, and 
Loy. Then at the Mew Year's Eve party — 
how many times did Paul Costel count down 
for that New Year's kiss? 

On a more serious note, Hattie's Night of 
fered a regretable mix of pain and pleasure. 
Hattie's Place, a long-ago favorite bar and 
hang-out for Davidson men, burned down in 
1975, and since that time, F & M has spon- 
sored a beerfest in memorial (this year, 32 
kegs!). Trouble struck, however, when a scuf 



ALL-STAR SPECTATORS: Lund Easterling. Eric San 
net. Lucy Phillips and Mike Fitzgerald at the fall Fall 
Stars Band Party 



fie broke out among students and some visi- 
tors at the party. Davidson student Joe Le- 
man received a gunshot wound in the chest. 
Although the antagonist escaped, he later 
turned himself in for trial. Leman recovered in 
time to complete his spring term at Davidson. 
F & M maintains recognition for spirited 
parties and high-powered meal times, but at 
the same time, house members enjoy the 
house for a quiet game of pool or relaxation in 
front of the television. The always-open beer 
box offers still another pastime for F & M 
members. 

Lucy Phillips 



OBSTACLE TABLE TENNIS: Mike Kehs and Bryan Kel 
leher play pingpong around cups of beer, observed by 
Dave Riopel. 




FANnV AND MABLE: (FronI Row) David Carpenter. Yvelle Mingo. Rip 
Singer. Carolirw Massey, Sarah Moody, Diane King. Liz Ribadeneyra. rAark 
Conner (Second Row) Rusly McLelland, Mil<e Murphy, Lisa Buckley. Ken 
Lewis, Pam Rew, Melissa McKeithen. Jim Cheeii, Laura Champlain, Riopel s 
woman, David Shoemaker (Third Row) Jim Brown, Johnny Edwards, Rob 
Gilhson, Johnny Leazer, Joe Palasak. Skip Brown, Bob Evans, Chris Elwood, 
Mike Kehs Rich Davis, Jeff Healh. Bob Trobich. Mike D Urso. Scot! Haighl, 



Joni Seehorn. Roger Herbert. Kathy Cantwell. Kent Jamison. Kathy Munger. 
Mike Schremmer, Liiyia Brown. Alice Packard. Dave Riopel, Natalie Kerr, 
Peter Brown, John Richards, Lucy Phillips. Ralph Mosca, John Teague. 
Rufus Westervelt (Back Row) Charles Askins, Loy Thornton, Paul Costel. 
Frank Santori. Sissy Hammond, Doug Ziedonis, Lisa Brown. David Pretty 
man. Bryan Kelleher. Jim Thoten, Nancy Cornwell, Rosie Whitesides, Paul 
SchuHz, Troy Thies 



Patterson Court 49 



Expand, Thrive, & Continue 



For ETC, the year was one of growth since 
ETC enjoyed an increase in membership over 
the previous years. 

House improvement was one of the. main 
goals of the year. Carpet and new furnishings 
provided a complete atmosphere change 
downstairs. Upstairs, the bathroom took on a 
different look with new wallpaper and floor 
tile. 

Social activities have been diverse. Friday 
afternoon cocktail parties were most popular 
during fall term but became more widely scat- 
tered as the year progressed. A wine and 
cheese party and formal dinner took place 
during Homecoming Weekend. 

During winter term, two band parties pro- 
vided entertainment for the campus. The Har- 
old Hill Band played before Christmas break. 



and The Kays performed for Midwinters. 

Other activities included ice cream socials, 
ice skating in Charlotte, a Christmas tree 
decorating party and a hamburger n' beer 
party to welcome the freshmen who will eat 
at ETC next year. ETC members were often 
invited to Sigma Phi Epsilon functions. 

One of the reasons for ETC's continued 
popularity is the food. Cooks Cecelia Conners 
and Odessa Williams do an outstanding job. 

The officers during the year were president 
Jim Northrup, treasurer Larry Jones, social 
chairman Craig Whitley and house manager 
Bryan Duke. 

— Jean Soracco 



SUDDENLY THIS FLYING SAUCER APPEARED: Mar 

garet Karis illustrating a U.F.O. story, or simply asking 
for a second helping? 




(Row 1) Walter Pharr, Milton Midas, Will Flanigan, Bob 
Whalen. Barry Mack, Monique Damm. Jim Northrup. 
Sally Campbell. (Row 2) Kathryn Murray. Mark Burris, 
Lucy Marshall, Eric Weiss, Shannon Hamilton, Gregg 
Smart, Wes Bean, Eddie Beeker, Sandra Davis. (Row 3) 
Dave Welchman, Sara Nock, Connie Kyle, Cathy Petrea, 



50 STUDENT LIFE 



Dave Roberts. Laura Bush. Tim Johnston, Bucky Mur 
rell. Rich Glaze. Danny Klinar (Last Row) Boe Young, 
John Storey, Cindy Hendnx. Lee Alexander. Albert Pot 
ter. Chuck Lifford. John Hughes, David Graybeal, Geoff 
Spencer. John "Bond" Monroe. 






IT WASN'T THAT BAD. WAS IT? Ralph Taylor gn 
rnaces ovpt an empty pl<il»' of the besi (ood on Pattern 
Courl 




STICK OOT YOUR TONGUE. AND SAY AAHHH! Enc 
Weiss is either sickening for something or is eating a bit 
size slice of peanut butter and jelly roll. 




Patterson Court 51 



2001: Pikes Proffer Their Predictions 



Pi Kappa Alpha is. Foosball, the sun team, 
front yard sports, the sand pile remaining 
from the Beach Party — all are Pike tradi- 
tions. But Pike means brotherhood. You see it 
whenever Pikes are together. Like at David- 
son basketball games. Or Busch Mountain 
Parties. Or meals at the house. Or no time 
particularly special. The strong fraternal feel- 
ing is always there. However, friendships are 
not limited to the house. Meither are our ac- 
tivities. Pikes are found in all areas of campus 
life — varsity athletics, hall counseling, stu- 
dent government, the church, theater — 
name the organization and the Pikes are 
there. Our involvement in Davidson activities 
adds even more excitement to the brother- 
hood. We're proud of who we are and what we 
stand for. 

In anticipation of a greater future. Pike pre- 
sents its Top Ten Predictions for 2001: 

1) Barber runs a motel in Boone, MC. 

2) Phil Daves finally has the bathtub 
surgically removed. 

3) The stereo volume still measures on 
the Richter scale (and still entertains 
afternoon art classes). 




BATHIMG BABY, OR BATHING BUD? Ken Kreig. Brad 
Harold and Dave Donahowever chilling a few six packs in 
the notorious tub? 



4) Eric Sanner, uh, is a famous, uh, 
orator. 

5) The Weekend List still circulates 
. . . constantly. 

6) Davidson breaks ground for the 
Tom Moore Space Observatory. 

7) Gram hasn't missed announcing the 
frat meeting for 21 years. 



8) The Fishing Report becomes an offi- 
cial part of meetings. 

9) Stukes is working the switchboard 
for Southern Bell. 

10) The Rule remains: DFWB!!!! 

-Ray Craven 



WITH A LECHEROUS LEER. John Robertson puts his 
arm around "Dream Girl" Ginger. 




PI KAPPA ALPHA: (Fronl Row) Ed Lindsey. Mark Carpenter. Bill Loflin, 
John Robertsofi. Tom Clark. Ken Kreig. Terry Wade, Andy Miles. Joruithan 
West (Second Row) Sluarl Baskin. Phil Daves, Gray Hampton, Jim Evans, 
Nick Tsanles, Dudley Moore, David Donahower, Eric Sanner, John Chidsey, 
Blair Manwell (Third Row) Mark Thomas, Carl Elliott, George Kent, Mark 
Oldenburg, David Barkley, Tom Haller. John Stanback, Bill Dascombe, Bill 



Seel, John Slipp, Ed WhilesKJes (Fourth Row) Ron ErT>erson, Mike Lock- 
wood, Trig Adams, James Altiier, Ray Craven, Lach Zemp, Dave Fleming, 
Eric Fichtner, David Poe, Chuck Luecker (Bock Row) Will Kendnck. Will 
Ounbar, Dave Stosur, Dick Bourne, David McLean, Dave Barber. Tom 
Schember, Brad Harrdd, Steve Stine, Steve Shield, Mark Morrison Craig 
White, Hal Mohorn. Jelf Nielsen 



52 STUDENT LIFE 




A FINE FIGURE OF A MAN: Jonathan West, beer 
hand, at the Spring Frolics Outdoor Concert. 

DIRECTIONAL BATHING: Terry Wade and David Dona 
hower proudly display a recent pledge felony 

Patterson Court 53 




■|';>5^' 



Us^^ 




FaNTlME DANCERS. Larry Jones and Debby Bland 
shag at the Mid winter SPE party 



PANNING WITH PANCAKES: Albert Potter and Mark COMPETING AT NATIONALS, in Knoxville, Tennessee. 
Burris discuss events at the SIg Ep's annual pancake are Lex Alexander and Walter Pharr. Davidson's SPE 
exam break ranks as one of the nation's best. 





H^.-*!??***^*'*~ 



T!;;.' 



SIGMA PHI EPSILON: (Front Row) Waller Piiarr. John Hughes. Alberl Richard Giaie. Larry Jones. Tim Johnslon. Bob Whalen. Jelf Wright. John Rob Campany. Willie David. Steve Lawrence. Gary Schenk. 0««pak Sahaw 

Poller M.ke Ameen, Will Flanagan, Gregg Smart. Mark Newman. Sandra Wrenn, Doug Austin. Brent Hilleary. Rick Watson. Eric Fink. Jim Pollard ney. Charles Robinson. David Lincoln. Paul Fry. Geoffery Spencer. E^vid 

Dav.s John Monroe Tom Cliff. Tim Bohnslav. Pete Neefus. Kevin Pressley. (Third Row| Alan Fields. Don Clew. Ralph Taylor Jim Brown. Bryan Sloan. Barnes, David Hutchinson Ken Howarth 

Frank Clark. Mark Burris. Doug Vass (Second Rowl Lanny Conley. Eddie Hunter Monroe, David Fryman. David Gaslon. Kelly Moore. Eric Hill. Mike 

Beeker. David Green, Danny Kllnar. Boe Young. George Murrell. Eric Weiss. Blake (Back Rowl Theo Wright, Jeff Knudson, Jim Mashburn. Tom Roth. 



54 STUDENT LIFE 



A Smart Head Behind The Red Door 



The Sigma Phi tpsilon fraternity is corn 
posed of over sixty Davidson men of diverse 
interests, linked in the strong common bond 
of brotherhood. Although the two residential 
fraternity houses are located a couple of 
blocks away from campus, on Morth Main 
Street, Sigma Phi Epsilon continues to play 
an important role in campus life. The brother 
hood is strong in the three areas of academ 
ics, athletics and extracurricular activities. At 
the same time, social life at the Sig Ep house 
is very varied. The social calendar has includ 



ed a Champagne Pajama Party, a Polynesian 
Paradise Party. Casino nights, and skiing and 
beach trips, in addition to regular cocktail 
parties, mixers, and band parties. Of course, 
the year climaxes with the annual Spring For 
mal. which this year was held at Raintree 
Country Club. 

Leading the group through a productive 
year were President Gregg Smart, VicePresi 
dent Larry Jones, Corresponding Secretary 
Kevin Pressley, Recording Secretary Mike 
Ameen. and Comptroller Brent Hilleary. not to 



mention Tim Bohnslav (Social Chairman). 
Walter Pharr (Rush Chairman), and Danny 
Klinar (Pledge Educator). Proof of success lies 
in the national recognition given to the chap- 
ter, as well as the strong bonds which will 
always exist behind the red door of Sigma Phi 
Epsilon. 

Walter Pharr 



FRITTKR FLIPPER. Rirky Watson, (laps himself anoth. 
golden griddle at tfie pancake exam break. 




Patterson Court 55 



njl: (Front Row) Doug Ammar, Mark Glllespy, Rusty McLelland, Rog Her Ehrman, Mills Anlley, Carl Anderson. Scott Otto. Ron Schui 

ben. Jeff Heath. Dale Culpepper. Dave Riopel. Van Wagner. Mark Conner. Chip McMichael. Wendell Washington. Johnnie Leajer. Da' 

Andy Scott. Jim Tholen. (Second Row) Rich Davis. John league. Jim Etre. ~ "' " 

Jon Norwood. Tim Brotherlon. Daniel Ettedgui, Dave Carpenter. Will Ber 
son. Doug Ziedonis. Bob Evans. Chuck Elyea. Dunbar Ivy (Third Row) Dave 
Hessler. Jim Troulman. Bob Trobich. David Shoemaker. Rip Singer. John 
Van Dell. Ken Lewis. Michael Adam (Fourth Row) Fred Zen Buddha 



. Jeff Kisller. 

Turner. John 
Muskoff. Bob Hopkins. John Odell. Mike Murphy. Ed Harlan. Rob Gtllison 
(Back Row) Alan Wallstedt. Paul Schulti. Dan Earnhardt. John Lusk. David 
Prettyman. John Hendrix. Paul Costel. Bob Rnch. Joe Palasak. Jeff Holland. 
Jim Cheek. Dave West. Bryan Kelleher. Jeff Mann. Bob Tate. Mike Fitzger 
aid. Dale Carter. Todd Kimsey. Trey Thies. Bill Barber. Bryan Zielinski 







99 BOTTLES OF BEER FIJI President. Paul Costel. 

knows that bottles of pure grain are more fun 



SAND CASTLES IN THE AIR. Beacfi comber. David 
Turner, appears less stable tfian his creative fort. 

"STROH, STROH, STROH YOUR BOAT " David 

Shoemaker sings a sudsy song at a typical Fiji Bacchana- 
lia. 



s^^/i 





THE TASTE TEST: Pseudo Fiji. Jeff Dillard. forks a mor 
eel while Rip Singer holds the ladel. at the Fiji Spaghetti 
Dinner held during Winter Term. 



56 STUDENT LIFE 



!^<^i 




CHARCOAL CHEER: Bob Evans. Scott Haight and Jeff 
Klstler char chicken for the brothers, during a Fall rush 
function. 



TUr Is Not A Four Letter Word 




Who says that Fiji is just sex and drugs? 
While we must admit that there is a time and 
a place for everything, we think it is impor- 
tant to point out some of the highest sides of 
our endeavor. Academic excellence, which 
has kept Fiji on top for the past several years, 
is once again high with brothers Bob Evans, 
Michael Fitzgerald, and James Tholen mak- 
ing Phi Beta Kappa. Community Service, 
which has traditionally included such things 
as work days for the Davidson community at 
large, and a Halloween party for the step tutor 
program, has been expanded to Charlotte. 
This winter Bryan Kelleher and twenty other 
brothers helped in cleaning up the halfway 
house. Fiji can proudly stand forward with 
respect to upholding the great Protestant 
work ethic. Two years ago we voted to earn 
$500 a term. With this money we are paying 
off our house mortgage (a high price for free- 
dom) and using the residual to enhance our 
alacritous social life. For the future, we, with 
the sovereign guidance of the trustees, would 
like to add living quarters to our existing prop- 



erty. Trey Thies, Jim Troutman, and Rob Gilli- 
son have already done much to assure com- 
pliance with building and zoning codes. In the 
sports arena Fiji has not faltered. This year we 
have brothers lettering in every sport David- 
son has to offer, including sailing with Will 
Berson at the helm. Special congratulations 
goes to Mike Schremmer for breaking David 
son records in 500 yd., 100 yd., and 1650 yd. 
freestyle swimming. 

As is already known, Fiji throws the best 
Rock 'n' Roll parties at Davidson, on and off 
campus. Feature bands such as the All-Stars 
and Blue Condition set fire to Davidson stu- 
dent ears while the Stroh's brewery company 
put out what was between them. 

Last and most important we are most 
proud of our new pledge class. This year's 
class, headed by Doug Ammar, has greatly 
enhanced the brotherhood with the highest of 
talent and the thirst for the zest of life so 
important to our fraternity. 

-John Teague 

Organizations 57 




EARNESTLY WORKING TO RAISE FUNDS FOR DA- 
VIDSON, volunteers Pete Collins and Jonathan Keith, 
along with many others, spent hours calling alumni at the 
SGA sponsored telethon 



CAREFULLY PONDERING THEIR NEXT AGENDA 
TOPIC. President Dave Waddill and Vice President Stuart 
Dorsett smoothly conducted all the SGA meetings 



^^^^^^^^Kf^'>' ■ 




^^^ f ^^^^^1 


If <■ ^^H 


Kk '^ 


11 ^-^ 


ISi^fli 


^^^. -""^^ - -^jflM^r-iRf^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^H 




* -<•, 



IN A TIMEOUT FOR A BRIEF DISCUSSION. Senators 
Andy Brown. Sherburne Laughlin, and Gray Hampton 
question a new proposal. 



58 STUDENT LIFE 



Success Finds The S.G.A. 



The SGA, or Student Government Associ 
ation. serves the many interests of the David- 
son students and community through its pro- 
jects and committees. Groups such as the 
Trustee Contact Committee aid in voicing stu- 
dent opinion in the administration of the Col- 
lege. The SGA Weekend, which brought 
many strong prospectives to the campus on 
March 26-28, and the course evaluation book 
let mailed to incoming freshmen are exam 
pies of SGA projects which serve the stu- 
dents. Two new projects which were very 
successful were the Phonathon and the Ca- 
reer Symposium. The Phonathon involved 
students calling alumni from the past ten 



years and soliciting aid in the Colleges fund 
drive. On March 30 and 31 the Career Sympo 
sium brought fifty businessmen and women 
from many different fields to conduct discus 
sion groups on career issues and fields of 
work. John M. Belk, an alumnus and busi- 
nessman from Charlotte, was honored on 
May 4, John Belk Day, for his contributions to 
the community. Former President Gerald R. 
Ford was the guest speaker on this occasion. 
The SGA experienced a year of innovation 
and great activity under the leadership of 
president David Waddill and vice president 
Stuart Dorsett. 

-Caroline Boudreau 




SGA: (First row) David Waddill. Lentz Ivey, Danny Wad Mack (Third row) Julie Cheek. Chip Hoover. Gray hamp- 

dill. Ken Howarth. Chip Lyerly. Stuart Dorsett. (Second ton. Diana Pierce. Tim Johnston. (Last row) Sherburne 

row) Steve Lowe, Eric Crum. Hunter Monroe. Ken Krieg. Laughlin, Chip Hurley. Rob Spaugh. Thomas Bates. Ray 

Elizabeth McMillian, Andy Brown. Debby Carlton. Barry Craven. Ron Davis. Kevin Pressley. 




DEVELOPING A LOOK OF DETERMINATION IN HIS 
EYES, Senator Barry Mack has been inspired by hearing 
of the hard work done by the SGA. 




60 STUDENT LIFE 



Davidson's SGA has its job cut out 



Lubricating The Wheels Of Bureaucracy 



Among other responsibilities, the Student 
Government Association provides a source of 
advice and direction for those making deci 
sions over events and issues which concern 
students. The SGA accomplishes this 
through a special set of advisory committees. 

The Council on Campus and Religious Life 
is one of these committees. Composed of two 
thirds students and one third faculty, this 
committee meets to discuss any issues con 
cerning students' social and spiritual well be 
ing. Discussions over the past year have re 
volved around whether to open Richards and 
Bailey as independent eating houses, and the 
requirements that should be included in the 
job description for the new college chaplain. 
Will Terry calls the meetings of the council 
and the number of meetings varies depending 
on the complexity of the issues. Most of the 
positions on the council are appointed by the 
SGA. A few are permanent seats that come 
"with the job. " such as the vice president of 
the SGA's position or Will Terry's position. 

One of the newer committees is the Media 
Board. This committee was formed as a pre 
cautionary editing body when questionable 
and possibly offensive material was submit 
ted for printing in the 1974 Quips and Cranks. 
The board, consisting of four faculty mem 
bers and four students, presides over all Da- 
vidson College literary publications and inter- 
views candidates for the editorships of stu 
dent publications, although final decisions on 
editorships are made by a general student 
election. 

A very active and important advisory com 
mittee is the Educational Policy Committee. 
This committee consisted of two student re 
presentatives. Bill Purcell and Elizabeth Med- 
lin, each appointed by the SGA for two year 
positions. They, along with faculty, review 
the curriculum and suggest additions, dele- 
tions and other changes within departments. 
Meeting two hours a week, this committee is 
responsible for many of the changes in cur 
riculum over the past few years, and though 
their proposal to change the area require 



ments was not accepted this year, such a 
change may be anticipated in the near future. 

An advisory honor committee, the Omicron 
Delta Kappa Society was established at Da 
vidson in 1917 to bring together the most 
representative individuals in all phases of col 
legiate life on a basis of mutual interest, un 
derstanding, service and helpfulness. Mem 
bers are elected on the basis of their achieve 
ments in five major phases of college life: 
scholarship, athletics, social and religious ser 
vices, journalism and speech, and creative 
and performing arts. ODK serves Davidson by 
sponsoring the Practice Interview Program for 
students seeking future employment or ap 
plying for graduate school and by presenting 
the ODK Teaching Award. 

A final advisory committee, though not un 



der direct jurisdiction of the SGA, is the Re 
view Board. This committee is the appealing 
body to the Honor Council. Consisting of 
three faculty members, each elected for three 
year terms by the faculty, and two rising sen- 
iors, elected by the student body, the Board 
determines whether there is sufficient evi- 
dence to appeal an Honor Council decision or 
whether any prejudicial treatment had oc 
curred during the hearing. Depending on 
these criteria, they may either enforce or ad 
just the decision of the Honor Council. 

These advisory committees provide part of 
an important network of checks and balances 
which keep Davidson running smoothly and 
efficiently for its students. 

-Lisa Sloan 

EDUCATION POLICY COMMITTEE: Elizabeth Medlin 




I 



Organizations 61 



students enforcing 



The Privilege Of Honor 




APPOINTED AS SECRETARY OF THE HONOR COGN 
CIL, PattI Long was busy all year contacting the mem 
bers when a trial arose. 




■■*-^aK 






liT-'i^^^^'^^'^'* 



HONOR COUNCIL: (Row 1) True Davis. Steve Carter. Sally Campbell. Diana Pierce. James Funsten. Pete Nee son. Debbie Metzgar. Kathryn Adkins. Rick Gai 
John Peebles. Patti Long. Susan Eglin. Hope McArn. fus. Jim Cheek (Last Row) Ed Lindsey. Lindsay Robert Kerr. Blaine Sanders. Jeff Ray 



62 STGDENT LIFE 



Every student shall be honor bound to re- 
frain from cheating (including plagiarism). 
Every student shall be honor bound to re- 
frain from stealing. 

Every student shall be honor bound to re- 
frain from lying under oath. 
Every student shall be honor bound to report 
immediately all violations of the Honor Code 
which come under his observation: failure to 
do so shall be a violation of the Honor Code. 

Davidson College students begin their ca 
reers at Davidson having agreed to abide by 
the above code. No other set of rules is as 
important to the maintenance of the way of 
life we enjoy here. Our way of life is one of 
openness and trust. The Honor Code says that 
we as a communty have faith in one's poten- 
tial to do and be good. Hopefully the environ- 
ment at Davidson cultivates or nourishes 
one's desire to live honorably. The existence 
of an honor system should induce a certain 
responsability and maturity which can carry 




TEAMING UP FOR THE POSITION OF STUDENT SO 
LICITOR. Blame Sanders and Jeff Ray presented ttie 
cfiarqes during Ifie student cases 




**'fe 



DEDICATED AND STRONGLY COMMITTED TO THE 
IDEALS OF THE HONOR CODE. Hope McArn was well 
respected as Ifie Chairman 



over into lilt- dlter Davidson 

Davidson students are free from so many 
hampering restrictions which plague other 
schools, but students must decide whether 
they will cherish that freedom by abiding by 
the Honor Code Many aspects of Davidson 
life force students to decide how they will 
conduct themselves. One has the privilege 
and the burden of leaving doors unlocked 
the privilege of convenience and freedom 
from worry; the burden of avoiding the temp 
tation to enter an unlocked room and steal. 
The stacks in the library are open and there is 
no security check at the door. Take-home 
problems and tests are given in all confidence 
that there is no monitor needed and that the 
mere signing of the word "pledged " indicates 
that the work is one's own. Exams are self 
scheduled, a privilege students are expected 
to honor by not discussing exams until testing 
period is over, and by reporting any violations 
of trust. Students definitely have a responsi 
bility. Shouldering that responsibility allows 
the honor system to work and Davidson life to 
be what it is. 

Some students fail to take their responsbili 
ties in regard to the Honor Code seriously 
Some see how much they can get away with. 
Most get caught. Some do not. [Neither the 
Honor System nor the special body which 
enforces it are flawless. Violations do occur, 
and it is the duty of the Honor Council to try 
those cases serious enough to be brought be 
fore it. When a trial convenes, the panel does 
its best through conscientious deliberation to 
determine whether or not, in their interpreta 
tion, the spirit of the Honor Code has been 
violated. All cases are not cut and dried. I 
wish they were. It is not easy to sit in judge- 
ment on one's peers, but thankfully the Honor 
Council will do this. 

The Council consists of eighteen students: 
nine seniors, six juniors, and three sopho 
mores. Elections for positions are held in the 
spring, potential condidates first being 
screened in an interviewing process. Those 
elected remain on the Honor Council for the 
remainder of their time at Davidson. New 
members are trained in Council meetings, a 
retreat in the fall, and via a means employed 
this year for the first time, a mock trial. 

From within the body of eighteen are elect 
ed a chairman and secretary to serve one-year 
terms The secretary calls, on a rotating basis 
if possible, a panel of six (at least two seniors, 
one of which is chairman, two juniors, and 
one sophomore) for each trial. The student 
solicitor(s) who brings the charge and the de 
fense advisor(s) who provides help for the 
defendant, play key roles in aiding the Honor 
Council interpret cases. The solicitor and de- 
fense advisor present the evidence of the 
case, with members of the panel asking ques- 
tions for clearification. After closing state- 
ments have been made, the Honor Council 
goes into its executive session, during which 
it attempts to reach a general understanding 
of the case and votes on guilt oi innocence 
Four out of the six panel members must vote 
guilty' for the defendant to be convicted. If it 
votes guilty, the panel then discusses and 



votes on a sanction, which for .1 

violation is usually suspension Suspension 

begins immediately with forfeiture of the cur 

rent term and the successive one. Code of 

Responsibility violations may be met with 

sanctions ranging from a warning to indefinite 

suspension. 

The majority of Honor Code convictions are 
for cheating, which includes plagiarism Last 
year there were five convictions resulting in 
suspension; this year there have been two. 
These numbers belie the actual amount of 
investigation of honor offenses The Dean of 
Students handles some cases himself and 
may dismiss others for lack of evidence. 

Conviction of an Honor Code violation is a 
serious thing. I urge you read the handbook 
on the Honor Code. Ccxle of f?esponsibility. 
and Code of Disciplinary Procedure. Be aware 
of your duty and the duty of the Honor Coun 
cil to preserve Davidson's enjoyable way of 
life. 

Hope McArn 




RESPONSIBLE FOR DEFENDING THE ACCUSED STU- 
DENTS, senior Ed Lmdsey was this year s defense advi 



Organizations 63 



FEELING THE CONSTANT PRESSORE OF A DEAD- 
LINE. Elizabeth Kiss hurriedly writes out her editorial 




64 STUDENT LIFE 




Capturing The Campus News 



If you were to venture down to the base 
nnent of tfie College Union very early on any 
Tfiursday morning, you could find a small but 
dedicated group of students putting together 
another issue of The Davidsonian, the Col 
lege's weekly newspaper. 

The work never ends for The Davidsonian 
staff members, as assignments are issued 
soon after the previous week's paper has 
been printed, and deadlines are staggered so 
that the work doesn't all come in at the last 
minute. Yet, late night work before the paper 
is printed is a common occurrence in The 
Davidsonian office. Section heads assign 
work and edit stories into final form, while 
editors-in-chief Elizabeth Kiss and John Si- 
man oversee the entire operation. They took 
over the editorship of The Davidsonian in 
January and will hold the position uniti De- 
cember. Mark Barrett edited the newspaper 
through December and now serves as execu- 
tive editor, aiding the new editors in several 
capacities. 

Circulation of The Davidsonian is approxi- 
mately 400, and the paper is delivered on 
Thursday evenings to every student's room. 
There are also free issues circulated at var- 
ious other spots around campus, so that pro- 
fessors and administration officials can catch 
up on the latest news. Subscriptions are solic- 
ited to students' parents and other people 
interested in the College, providing a hefty 
addition to the income of the paper. 

The Davidsonian operates on a yearly bud- 
get of SI 6,000, which is acquired each year 
from tuition through the Activities Tax Coun- 

FULFILLING ONE OF THE DUTIES OF BACK PAGE 
EDITOR, Ivy Goodman begins to layout her section. 



cil. Paid positions on the staff include the 
editors-in-chief, typesetters, veloxers, delivery 
persons, and the circulation manager All oth- 
er staffers are volunteers who spend many 
hours per week in order to put together a 
quality paper. 

Changes in the completely student-run 
newspaper this year have been more varied 
coverage of news, an increase in the number 
of articles on student-related activities, and 
greater recognition of campus organizations. 
"We have been changing in the past five 
years to a more issue-oriented newspaper, 
rather than a glorified announcement sheet as 
the paper used to be," said editor Kiss of The 
Davidsonian, past and present. 

Organization and teamwork play a great 
role in putting together the paper each week, 
but the dedication staffers have for their 
work, according to Kiss, is the most valuable 
asset of The Davidsonian. And, at a College 
which places so much emphasis on studies, 
such a hard-working group of people is also a 
phenomenon which is indeed worthy of recog- 
nition. 

-Jim Reese 



DAVIDSONIAN: First row Jeff Demsey. Jeff Herrin. 
Glenn Kellum. John Siman, Elizabeth Kiss. David 
McCurry. Nick Graham. John Krotchko Second row- 
Francis Palmer, Mary Womble Barringer. Beth Findlay, 
Karen Sandlin. Bernadette Walter. Anne Goodwin, Steve 
Soud. Peter Hairston, Sally Neal. Mike Mason. Jeff Mann. 
Third rowSally Campbell. Fred Broadwell. Margaret 
Jackson. Jenny QBriant. Ralph Lasley. Tim Whalen. 
Charlie Lovett. Mike Kehs. David Prettyman. James Bar- 
rat, Marvin Overby. Gary Sullivan. Jim Pollard. 




MOMENTARILY LOOKING UP FROM HIS WORK. Jeff 
Mann is in the midst of enlarging a photograph. 



Organizations 65 



Creativity In Publication 



With the intention of "Reorganizing Excel- 
lence in Prose and Poetry Composition," The 
Miscellany: A Davidson Review was first 
published on December of 1965. While its 
reputation has grown steadily through the 
years. The Miscellany has remained much 
the same — a student-faculty publication, ac- 
cepting poetry, art, and fiction entries from all 
over America. Its emphasis remains simply 
the appreciation of innovative literature. This 
year saw the publication of two issues under 
the guidance of Dr. Julius Winkler and editor 
Dave Roberts. In the spring, the new editor- 
ship fell to junior Parks Snead, who published 
the year's final issue. 

Students also publish the literary magazine 
Hobart Park. The magazine accepts contribu 
tions of poetry, fiction, artwork, photography, 
and essays from students, faculty, and com- 
munity members. Cinder editor Eddie Harrison 
the magazine came out biannually; next 
year's editor, David Banks, hoped to increase 

PLAMrSIMG AND LAYING OCJT. Donna lies, .^nn Parker 
and Barbara Kelley start early in order to get the Wildcat 
Handbook out to the freshmen. 



this number to at least three or four issues per 
annum. However, his operating budget was 
cut by the Activities Tax Council and this will 
be impossible. 

A third student publication is The Wildcat 
Handbook which is co-edited by Barbara Kel 
ley and Donna lies. The book contains pic 
tures of freshmen, candid shots of hall coun 
selors, and articles by students on various 
organizations and aspects of student life. 
There is also a section on restaurants, hide 
aways, churches, sympathetic listeners, and 
other information that comes in handy when 
one is dying for a good burger, when the 
security blanket is beginning to get thread- 
bare, or when the freshman hall becomes a 
little too much to handle. The Handbook is 
sent to the incoming freshmen during the 
summer, giving the freshmen plenty of time 
to mull over names and faces, and get a se- 
condhand preview of Davidson life. 

-Frances Palmer, Donna lies 

ASTONISHED BY THE PRODUCTIVITY OF HER CO- 
EDITOR. Barbara Kelley shrieks at their progress. 





66 STUDENT LIFE 




WILDCAT HANDBOOK: (Row 1 1 Editors Donna lies and 
Batbdro Kelley (Last Row) Anne Mitchell, Mary Womble 
Barringer. Mary Tabb. Jeb Benedict 

PROMOTIONAL FLYER FOR HOBART PARK solicited 

student participation in campus maqazinH 




There's a better place for your creativity 
than these walls. 



BUSY WITH ONE OF THE TASKS OF PRODUCTION. 
Jeb Benedict types up some copy 



REPRESENTING THE OLD AND THE NEW. Dave Rob 
erts edited the Miscellany in the fall, and Parks Snead 
published the spring issue 





Deadline: 
April 12, 1981 



Box 3052 Davidson, NC 28036 



Organizations 67 



The True Making Of The Almighty Quest 



In a galaxy far, far away, a tiny star came 
into being. Its light was no brighter than the 
reflection off a pair of duck shoes in the rain, 
thus eons passed before its meager light 
reached Earth. But this was no ordinary star, 
for at the exact moment its rays sprinkled 
down onto our fair planet, a young maiden 
was impregnated with an idea. The lass who 
was known throughout the kingdom of David- 
sonia as Dim Diane, gazed up into the heav- 
ens at just the perfect second, dropping her 
armload of twigs in complete awe. Yes, it was 
an awakening of a soul, the planting of a seed, 
the beginning of a nightmare. Dim Diane had 
seen the light. 

Out of breath and no longer pure. Dim 
Diane announced her new position in life to 
anyone who would listen. "Hear Ye! hear ye! 
From this day forth I shall be known unto all 
as Mistress Fantasm and I shall accept only 
one mission in life: To create a Yearbook wor- 
thy of my name." She cried out in vain, for at 
three in the morning the only people awake 
were monks pulling all-nighters, and everyone 
knew that they were too busy to be bothered 
with important activities. 

There was no time to waste. Soon after 
dawn, the former Dim Diane dressed in the 
attire of the court, a royal blue sweatshirt 
bearing the immortal words "Yearbookers Do 
It Annually." She then gallopped furiously to 
the castle adorned with maidens. Castle 
Chambers. There she addressed the lords and 
officers of the court. "I ask your blessings, oh 
my advisors and teachers, on my thankless 
quest for the Almighty Yearbook. To please 
your honors I have hired the services of Sir 
Les, the Publishing Company Jester, to aid 
me in my quest." As she spoke, she pointed 
to the stocky jester in the corner of the room. 
To this the all powerful ones replied, "We 
approve this dubious mission, but we must 
ask that you take with you an eye of the 
court, Zach in the Sac." From the middle of 
the crowd sprang a slender lad in a colorful 
kilt. "Zach, that's me! And I'm sure I can 
handle this one, your honors. Thank you ever 
so much!" So Mistress Fantasm, Les the Jest- 
er, and Zach in the Sac headed on their merry 
way. 

Things started happening with furry. 
Weeks past like minutes and minutes like 
months. The movement swelled. The Mis 
tress, having been given a dingy cubby hole in 
Grey Castle, began to collect a gathering. Sir 
Russell, an ExChancelor of the Exchequer, 
volunteered to manage the monetary affairs. 
He came highly recommended, for he lived 
adventurously among alligators, often playing 
polo on their backs. After a few mud slinging 
battles, a serf known to many as Snatch ap 
peared. He hoped to add much to the cam- 
paign by inventing a box that would duplicate 
things visually in a flash. Many others began 
to fall into this pit, including a few dragon 
slayers calling themselves "P.K.'s ". With the 
addition of countless others, the mission 



68 



seemed almost plausible. 

Casting aside the peeled grapes and wild 
orgies of their peers, these Yearbookers 
talked only of their ideal. They made the most 
of their ivory mezzanine overlooking the me 
tallic shields and cloth umbrellas of the Snack 
Bar. With time, the cramped cavern was 
humbley called "Home ". The Mistress Fan 
tasm, or simply M.F. as she was often called 
behind closed doors, planned for a crusade to 
the coastland resort of Charleston. Many en 
thused Yearbookers made the trek and en 
joyed the common bond that grew there. It 
was there that the Mistress eliminated all 
fears, even convincing herself that this was a 
worthwhile cause. (The Mistress' original 
name would have suited best at that mo- 
ment.) But there too the Yearbookers learned 
two important things: Les the Jester was not 
a magician and Zach in the Sac was never 
going to come out of hiding. More or less, 
mostly more, the young crusaders were on 
their own. 

Time flew by faster than a water balloon on 
a hot spring day. The actual work began. 
Coincidentally, of course, a deathly plague 
struck the Almighty Quest. It was not the flu. 
The idealistic crusaders suddenly realized 
that their mission was no piece of cake. Mem- 
bers fell to the disease right and left, in front 
and behind, above and below, all over. 

This crippling plague left many unhatched 
layouts without a nest below or a warm rear- 
end above. The great M.F. gathered the re- 
maining few and released the grave news. She 
preached of commitment and future satisfac 



tion, but all heads remained lowered. She 
spoke of importance and hope, but no head 
looked up. Finally she mumbled something 
about their quest being over soon, and all 
hands flew into the air and shouts of glee 
could be heard all over the kingdom. "Ding, 
dong! It will be done, " chanted the inebriated 
group. With new vigor and enthusiasm, the 
campaign was reborn. 

Time was no longer flying by; it was not 
showing up in the first place. Far below the 
ivory pig stye. Serf Snatch groped in his cold, 
dark dungeon for hours on end. Outside in the 
rain, several Yearbookers sat waiting to re- 
cord history with their boxes and pens. Going 
door-todoor. Sir Russell and his exuberant 
Squire Carl unloaded worthless goods, such 
as greasy doughnuts, blase cookies, insignifi- 
cant ads, soggy hoagies, and wilted flowers, 
onto the fair citizens on Davidsonia. Up in the 
poorly lighted tower, many eyes grew weary 
of laying out plans for battle. And off, in her 
own little world, the great Mistress mused to 
herself, "Was that really an omen star I saw or 
just a light on Main Street? " But it mattered 
not, for the goal was in sight. The quest would 
soon be complete and the rewards collected! 
But even this mattered not, for far, far away 
in a distant galaxy, a tiny star chuckled in 
space. "In the beginning it was three dudes in 
the middle of some desert. Now look at me — 
even I only get it once a year." The tiny star 
pulled on his royal blue sweatshirt, yawned, 
and prepared for next year's enlightening 
show. 

-Chris Gunn 




QaiPS AND CRANKS: (First row) Philip Alter. Mark 
Conner. Tim Boyer. Lee McCornnick. Karen Welty. (Sec 
ond row) Karen Hopper, David McCurry, Diane Odom, 
Laura Curry, Tracy Thompson. Russell Snipes. Lisa 
Sloan, Mike Allan (Third row) Reaves Robinson. Bryna 
Watson, Scott Otto. Kathleen Huff. Nan Zimmerman. 



Chris Gauch. Jim Reese, Liz Ribadenyera. Debby Wil- 
liams. John Breidenstine. (Last row) Katie Tully, Frances 
Palmer. Caroline Boudreau, Eric Long. Carl Anderson 
Dale Withrow. Jim Morgan. Chris Gunn. Malcolm C^mo- 
bell '^ 




WITH BEAMING SMILE AND POISED PENCIL. Bryna 
Wdtson exemplihes the lamous quotation Happiness is 
doing a yearbook layout 

ENDOLGING IN ONE OF QUIPS AND CRANKS MOSI 
POPULAR ACTIVITIES. Carol Roche grins at th. 
thought of munching out on an ice cream sundae 




M^- 



TO OUR UNSUNG HEROES, the photographers, who 
get a caption but no picture because they are too busy 
taking photographs of others. 

JUST ANOTHER TYPICAL QUIPS AND CRANKS 
MEETING, as the staff kidnaps Nan Zimmerman from 
the 900 Room on her birthday. 



Onion Committees Present Variety For 



What would you expect from the center of 
campus-wide activities? When that center is 
Davidson's College Union, you can expect 
concerts featuring diverse bands, movies for 
the current film buff as well as classical favor 
ites, important speakers in addition to infor 
mal talks, art shows, ice cream, dances. Art 
ists Series, mountain hikes — the list won't 
end! Some highlights- 

The Concert Committee brought in big 
name bands like Ultravox, the Nighthawks, 
Herbie Mann, and Steel Pulse. The Dance 
Committee, in addition to the ever-present 
disco, featured campus wide dances with the 
Entertainers and the North Carolina School of 
the Arts Jazz Ensemble. 

Intimate Performances added such acts as 
Pierce Pettis, Oliver, Nee Ningy Band, John 
Stanfield, John McEuen, and Paula Larsen. 

In the film department. Pop Films included 
such greats as "Annie Hall," "All That Jazz, " 
"A Clockwork Orange, " "Being There," and 
"The Deerhunter," while Fine Films held its 



own with "Psycho," "The Blue Angel," "The 
Forbidden Planet," "My Brilliant Career," and 
"Chinatown." 

On the cultural side. Speakers Committee 
brought in Victor Herman, Kenneth Wooten, 
and Senator Birch Bayh, and also sponsored 
several other campus speakers. The Artists 
Series completed a successful year with Mi- 
chael Lorimer, Pat Carroll, the Charlotte Sym 
phony, Mummenschanz, and the North Caro- 
lina Ballet. 

Not to be forgotten are the art exhibits in 
the Union Gallery, food and fun for the dorms 
(sponsored by the Dorm Social Committee), 
College Bowl and games tournaments. Open 
Luncheons, outdoors clinics and outings, var- 
ious cultural events, and several poets 
brought in by the Poetry Committee. 

Of course, these are just highlights. The 
Union never stops hopping with entertain- 
ment both educational and diversionary all 
through the year. 

Ann Parker 





ONION COMMITTEES: (Row 1) Tom Besselieu. Marvin 
Overby. Ann Parker, Tim hewcombe. Karen Long. Jaime 
Ashmore, Carol Impara, Ben McCall, Kathryn Murray, 



Julie Holding. Betsy Haas. Greg Kucera. Mark Elmore. 
Lyman Collins (Row 2) Mike Harbert, Lindsay Biddle. 
Sherman Allen. Shawn Smith, Mike Goode. Dr Galt>e, 



Dave Hoskins. Jonathan West. Dr Barnes, James Fun- 
sten. ■ 



70 STUDENT LIFE 



The Campus 




TAKING THE POPULAR DAVIDSON STUDY BREAK. COMPLIMENTS OF THE UNION. John Shaw helped 

Lyman Collins and Maiy Ann Gelly attend Bridge Niqhl in provide popcorn at the Activities Fair, 

the 900 Room 





TRYING HER HAND AT BRlDCjS ndy Faulkenberry 
enjoys Bridge Night sponsored by the Union Games Com 
mittee 

DISCUSSING IMPORTANT UNION MATTERS. Union 
Director Shaw Smith and Ann Parker plot another Union 
Activity 



Organizations 71 




WDSR: (Row 1) Jessica Hunt. Lisa Smith. Kather- 
ine Cross, Bev Hart. (Row 2) Karis Herrnstein. 
John Verdi, Leslie Bryan. (Row 3) Bill Hay, Tom 
my Kirk, Johnnie Edwards, Eric Long. 




INTENT ON PLANNING HIS PROGRAM. Hugh Floyd 
must choose, then time, the music he wants to play. 




SILVER TONGUED AND CHARMING. Mike Keh? 
sponsible for announcing public service mess.d, 
information such as the time and weather. 



72 STUDENT LIFE 



Radio Alternatives Enrich The Campus 



Davidson is the home for two radio stations 
that serve both the campus and the Charlotte 
area. 

WDAV has grown from a 10 watt, student 
radio station to an 18.5 kilowatt professional 
ly run radio station in less than two years. It 
serves the greater Charlotte area with an eigh- 
teen-hour programming day which includes 
classical music, jazz and alternative rock. 

Employing a full-time professional staff of 
four (station manager, community affairs di- 
rector, production and music directors) the 
station also employs between twelve and fif- 
teen part-time student assistants. Many of the 
students working at WDAV are on the air as 
announcers during both classical and alterna 
five music shifts, and a staff of four to five 
also work in the library as music program- 
mers, typists, and assistant librarians for 
WDAV's 3,000 disc classical record collec- 
tion. 

Though presenting classical music during 
the daytime hours, WDAV devotes the late 
evenings to offering music not heard on the 
commercial stations in the Charlotte area: 
week nights feature alternatives in rock mu- 
sic, and weekend evenings are devoted to 
jazz, with special features in both areas pro- 
duced by WDAV staff and guest producers 



from the community 

WDAV is supported by both Davidson Col- 
lege and its listeners, whose donations make 
up better than half of the station's operating 
budget. It is also through these committed 
listener-members that much of WDAV's vol 
unteer, community programming is accom 
plished. WDAV actively solicits community 
involvement in both programming and pro- 
duction. 

In essence, the other radio station, WDSR. 
was created out of the ashes of the adminis- 
tration's professionalization of WDAV. 

The initial staff had to deal with a complete 
lack of a record library, a non-existent cam 
pus reputation, and a dubious collection of 
equipment. Moreover, the station itself has 
had to fight the stigma of being an Inadequate 
panacea offered by the Trustees. In fact, DSR, 
a carrier current station, has given to the 
students an artistic outlet and a source of 
experience In mass media. WDSR offers spe- 
cial presentations in rock, jazz and reggae 
that are conceived, produced and performed 
by students for students. In the future the 
medium could represent an important outlet 
for student editorial views, comedy, drama 
and serial screenplay. 

•Will Berson 



PLtASED BY HIS SELECTIOfH. Jff( Wilhdms di-voi- 
much lime dl WDAV to (inding nrw and enlcfloininy 
pieces 





MENTALLY PREPARirHG FOR HIS NEXT RA- 
DIO Ar^NOONCEMENT. John Odelle devotes 



many hours a week as a D,J. for WDSR. This new 
and totally student run radio station is diverse ir 



lis playing selections Satisfied with his selections. 
John sits hack for a well-deserved break 



L 



Orgdnizations 73 



Choruses Acquire New Direction 



Choir is the most established of Davidson's 
musical traditions, and you can not discuss 
the Davidson Choral Program without remem 
bering Donald Plott. For over 25 years the 
"Silver Fox" held the highly honored Dana 
chair in music. Gnder his direction the Male 
Chorus became a Davidson College institu- 
tion with a natural reputation of excellence. 
Under his support the Women's Chorus was 
founded and equipped with a director, Linda 
Warren, and funds to tour — all the tools 
necessary for the group to come into its own. 
Additionally under his direction, the Chamber 
Choir — a coed group, performed in the Ves 
pers Service and a spring concert. Having had 
the honor of working with Mr. Plott in Cham 
ber Choir, I can praise his firm, talented direc- 
tion, but can only begin to express the great 
sorrow everyone felt when he passed on this 
spring. It's hard to imagine that any note will 
be sung at Davidson without a silent, subcon 
scious dedication to Donald Plott. 

The Male Chorus learns a lesson in Wom- 
en's Lib. Enter Mary Nell Saunders: an affir 



mative, outspoken, spunky, director. Her mis 
sion — to conduct the Male Chorus begin 

ning with Spring Tour. "What?! A woman?!" 
The initial reaction of most Male Chorus 
members paralleled this statement (though 
some individuals expressed a greater degree 
of disgust). But Mary Nell, determined and 
talented, forged on ahead. The tour led these 
wandering minstrels and lady friend north 
ward — Boston and New York being two of 
their stops. After 10 days on the road they 
arrived back at the college exhibiting, much 
to the surprise of all, an unusual symptom of 
undying loyalty and respect for Mary Nel 
Saunders. In their spring concert, her talents 
in conducting and the Mens capacity for im 
provement and performance culminated in 
the audience's enthusiastic standing ovation 
While the men toured the North, the wom 
en turned Southwards. Under the direction of 
the self-proclaimed "benevolent despot. " Lin 
da Warren, hours of tedious practice paid off 
in excellent performance. So, what is tour a 
about? Well, first and foremost it is an oppor 



WOMEN'S CHORUS: (Row 1 ) Mimi Fleming. Mane Eilis 
Jamie Brown, Susan Eglin (Row 2) Mary Womble Bar 
renger. Daren Baldwin, Whit Wampler, True Davis. (Row 



tunity for the choirs to take the spirit of the 
college around the country. Secondly, it is an 
opportunity for the groups to do some intense 
practice and make unprecedented improve- 
ments in preparation for the spring concert on 
campus. Finally, but of course not the least 
consideration — A GOOD TIME. 

There are many hours on the bus, many 
hours of practicing and many practicing on 
the bus, but it is worth it. Of course there are 
those of us who manage to find disaster any- 
where we go. For example, one illustrious 
member of our chorus (certainly not yours 
truly) was in a carwreck in Charleston, S.C., 
got bitten (twice) by her host family's German 
Sheperd in Atlanta, got painfully sunburned 
in Florida, fell down a flight of cement stairs 
at the Contemporary Resort Hotel at Disney 
World . . and then the bus broke down 5 
miles outside Charlotte. Well, if this person 
can still have positive feelings about the "Da- 
vidson College Choir Experience" someone 
must be doing something right. 

Karen Hopper 



3) Aubrey Humphries. Diana Pierce. Mary Tabb (Last 
Row) Sydney Foreman, Holly Spannuth, Tracy Askew. 
Stephanie Moffett 




LAMPLIGHTERS IN LIVERY: Glenn Kellum, Rob Cam 
pany. Jeff Coleman, in full uniform singing at the Gradu 
ation Concert in Love Auditorium 



74 STUDENT LIFE 



IN FULL SONG, members ot Ihe women's chorus. Au 
btey Humphries. Sue Jenney. Mary Tabb, True Dav 
pf-rforming in concerl 




MEN'S CHOROS: (Row I) Gordon Turnbull. Glenn Kel 
lum. Mark Oldenburg, Mark Hayes. Earl Woolen. Mike 
Fitzgerald (Row 2) Meal Biggers. Brian Brest, Todd Cow 
dery. Donald Caldwell. Jeff Jordan. Rob Campany. John 



Thomas, Bill Barber, Craig Adams (Last Row) Phil Per 
Lee. Jim Troutman. Larry Jones, John Eglin, Rick 
Graves, Kevin Pressley. Rene Herlong 





VARIOUS PREPARATIONS OCCUR BEFORE A 
CHAMBER CHOIR CONCERT. Neal Biggers. Hugh 
Floyd, and Karen Welty get ready to go on stage. 



POSED IN MID-SONG, the diverse members of the 
Chamber Choir enjoy giving concerts yearround. 



CHAMBER CHOIR: (Row 1) Joyce Robmson Aubrey 
Humphries, Buncie Hay. (Row 2) Tracy Askew, Jeff Jor 
dan, Jorgia Rice. (Row 3) True Davis. Sarah Moody. Alice 
Packard. Jean Covell (Last Row) Hugh Floyd, Karen 
Welty, Neal Biggers 




Musical Ensembles Flaunt 



Varied Virtuosity 



Football games, college banquets, coffee 
and cokes, outdoor concerts. E.H. Little's 
Birthday, convocation, and graduation 
everything is enhanced by the presence of 
one of Davidson's numerous bands. There are 
at least eight separate groups who perform 
around campus, the community and the 
country. 

The wind ensemble is the largest group 
with forty members. Size does not diminish 
the dedication and commitment necessary to 
participate in this group though, as they prac- 
tice at least once a week together for their 
numerous concerts and tours. Last spring the 
group sent part of spring break together in 
New Orleans, unfortunately arriving too late 
for the Mardi Gras activities, but enjoying the 
sights nevertheless. 

The jazz ensemble is composed of twenty 
people, some of whom are also involved in 
the wind ensemble. The jazz ensemble is par- 
ticularly well-known throughout campus, and 
the 900 room is packed during their concerts. 
In addition to playing for campus concerts 
and other college associated activities such 
as banquets, the jazz ensemble also plays for 
private occasions. They succeeded in raising 
$1,000 for WDAV through private perfor- 



mances. 

The smaller groups of instrumentalists per- 
form with less regularity and their members 
often play in other groups as well. The brass 
ensemble is one of these. It plays at many 
church services throughout the year and at 
the fall and spring convocations. 

A new group, student organized and stu- 
dent run is the Brass Quintet. Their perfor 
mance list includes a recital at Queens, and a 
concert in MCNB plaza and one in Richardson 
Plaza for E.H. Little's Birthday. 

Robert Blalocke directs the Horn Quartet 
who performed on tour and also had a recital 
on campus. The Flute Ensemble is aided by 
Shirley Jackson and had a formal recital at 
Davidson and in Monroe. They also per- 
formed on tour. 

The String Ensemble is a larger group, 
composed of twelve members and has a ma- 
jor spring Chamber Music performance. 

And last but not least, the mighty pep 
band. Led by Glen Simpson, this band ap- 
pears at football and basketball games to pro- 
vide halftime entertainment and, of course, 
start all the fight songs off in the right key. 

-Lisa Sloan 





PLAY IT RIGHT THIS TIME, PLEASE! William D Law 
ing directs Davidson's Wind Ensemble at their final 
spring concert on the front lawn of Chambers. 



WELCOME TO AN EVENING OF MUSICAL ENTER- 
TAINMENT. Lisa Harbottle and her fellow French horn 
players perform in a formal recital of the Horn Ensemble 
under the direction of Robert Blalock 



76 STUDENT LIFE 



DON'T PUFF YOUR CHEEKS. ED! DenioribHiHina (in<- 
playing fotm. tiombonisl Ed Harlan performs with the 
extremely popular Jazi Ensemble in the 000 Room 



■76 TROMBONES LED IHE BIG PARADE'Well, nol 
quite The Wind F nsemble s Tromt>onl^ts. Dan Melzel. 
Tony Smith I ,1 H.nl.m, ,md Stii.irt Baskin ate featur.-d at 





SIXTY FINGERS CAN PRODUCE SOME SWEET MU 
SIC. These specialized musicians. Catherine McMillan. 
Laurie Campbell. Elizabeth Brazell. Deborah Schretter. 
Cambria Melton, and Lucy Marshall of the Flute Ensem 
ble provide an alternative to the larger groups of varied 
instruments. 



Block Heads Adopt Grandparents 



Ice cream socials, STEP tutors, adopted 
grandparents, and Depot lunches . . these 
are just a few of the projects pursued during 
one of the most enthusiastic years of the Y 
Student Service Corps, 1980-81. Starting in 
September, under the leadership of former 
president Minor Sinclair, the Y had a tremen 
dously successful fund drive, and garnered 
more volunteer support for its dozen year- 
long projects than in the past several years. 
Along with its blocks of STEP tutoring, the 
Day Care Center, and Depot lunches, the Ser 
vice Corps saw a marked expansion in other, 
newer areas; Prison Visitation, Adopt a Grand- 
parent, and Current Events blocks. 

This winter the group retreated to Bon Clar 
ken Assembly, in Flat Rock, N.C., for a re 



evaluation and reorientation weekend, during 
which Y philosophy, projects, and goals were 
looked over and assessed. Also during the 
winter, the Envirionmental block, with about 
15 Y members, built an excellent solar green 
house onto the Depot, to help defray heating 
costs, and to provide the senior citizens with a 
plant nursery. 

Spring term opened well, with a free, cam 
pus-wide lasagna dinner, and finished up with 
two special events: the Crop walk and Town 
Day. All three were unqualified successes. 

Throughout the year, student participation 
in the weekly blocks and in the special events 
was both committed and encouraging; some 
blocks had more student volunteers than jobs 
for them to fill. But that is not to say that 



community needs no longer exist, nor does it 
indicate that the Y has nothing left to do in 
Davidson; for the organization still faces the 
task of inculcating in students the habit of 
serving the community, and making it a bet 
ter place in which to live. While this task can 
never be fully attained, the Y continues to try. 
If the responses of the town and of the cam 
pus are any indication, then student leader- 
ship and involvement have been the greatest 
of recent years. Although the Y reluctanly 
loses its senior leaders, it also looks forward 
to continued growth and service opportuni 
ties in Davidson. 

•John Spangler 




SMILING IN ANTICIPATION OF A HEAPING BOWL 
OF ICE CREAM. Elizabeth Flanders is attending the Y 
sponsored Lasagna Dinner. 

LICKING THE ICE CREAM OFF HER FINGERS. Flor 
ence Hart enjoys herself as much as her step tutor child 



78 STUDENT LIFE 




PAINTING FACES TO ORDER. Suzanne Hutchings 
makes a colorful contribution to the Halloween Festivi- 
ties. 

BELIEVING IN THE NECESSITY OF TEAMWORK IN Y 
ACTIVITIES. Barb Ashley. Carolyn Scott, and Florence 
Hart put up a poster about their Christmas projects 



Organizations 79 



RELAXING DORING A SMALL GROUP MEETING. Ann REACHING FOR ANOTHER BOX OF CHICKEN. IVF 

Parker and Turley Howard spend time talking about their representative Clyde Godwin enjoys the indoor end of the 
week's experiences. year picnic 



DANCING IN THE TRUE FORTIES-STYLE. Lisa Sloa 
and Chuck Luecker attend DCF'S Valentine's Dance 



1 


f 


■g 


■ 


i 


^ 


1 






liHUJ 


i w^i m 


1 


y- 




DAVIDSON CHRISTIAN FELLOWSHIP: (Row I) Mimi Hilleary, Bill Dascombe. Alex McCallie. Turley Howard 

Flemino. Chuck Lueiket, Julia Pidaeon (Last Ro« I Brenl Weezie Mann. Rand Malone 



8(1 SlUDtlNT LIFt 



'Help Lists' Promote Christian Involvement 



Davidson Christian Fellowship is a student 
run organization dedicated to the person of 
Llesus Christ. Within this central purpose, 
DCF enjoys a multi-faceted existence. 

Appropriately for Davidson, it is an intellec- 
tual, questioning organization. Great stress is 
placed upon exploring the identity of Christ, 
and the implications that His identity has on 
contemporary life. This year, a short seminar 
on Modern Theologies, presented by Alex 
McCallie, stimulated members to consider 
theologies and views as distinct from personal 
beliefs. One of the valuable lessons learned 
from this questioning, was the importance of 
honesty, a quality so vital in elevating mere 
dogma to the sincere following of Christ. 

Another important aspect of DCF activity 
Is achieved through its frequent social func- 
tions. Through lake picnics, parties at Erwin 
Lodge, a "Big-Band" Dance, square dances 
and weekly large group meetings, DCF pro- 
vided plenty of opportunities for meeting with 
old friends, and for cultivating new friend 
ships. Thanks to the efforts of Weezie Mann, 
members were rarely without new "I will 
help" lists to sign or extra cookie dough in 
their freezers. 

Mimi Fleming's "help" lists were no less 



notorious, but were concentrated in another 
field of DCF endeavor, namely its capacity as 
a service organization. The Fellowship held 
several work days: days devoted to working 
in the community. They also participated in 
the campus-wide work day, sponsored by the 
Y-Student Corps, and did special work in 
"winterizing" community houses. Other ser 
vice projects included a clothing drive, deli 
vering cookies to the freshmen during their 
first exam period, and participating in the 
March of Dimes walk-a-thon. 

A final, and very important aspect of DCF 
is its work as a spiritual organization. The 
Fellowship strove to meet students' spiritual 
needs through church services, through the 
fellowship in large and small groups, and 
through the teaching of its leaders, such as 
Bill Dascombe (DCF president) and Clyde 
Godwin (Inter-varsity representative) and of 
guest speakers, such as Charles Lloyd and Dr. 
Pat Edmondson. 

Although not an Inter-varsity chapter, DCF 
is organized very much like one. Large meet- 
ings are held each Sunday night, when the 
whole group comes together. These meetings 
consist of singing, skits, talks and discus- 
sions. The large group is also subdivided into 



groups of eight to twelve students, which 
meet separately during the week for Bible 
study and the pursuit of closer friendships. 
An executive board serves as an overall co 
ordinating body for the group. President Bill 
Dascombe, assisted by large group leaders 
Turley Howard and Alex McCallie, social 
chairman Weezie Mann, service chairman 
Mimi Fleming, and small group coordinators 
Chuck Luecker, Rand Malone, Julia Pidgeon, 
and Brent Hilleary did an excellent job with 
DCF organization and leadership. One of the 
highlights of their work was a weekend re- 
treat at Young Life's Windy Gap, which pro- 
vided lots of fun and learning to brighten the 
winter term blahs. 

But a quiet weekend in the snow-covered 
mountains provides only an inkling of the 
over-all picture of DCF: a diverse, involved 
and committed organization unified by the 
common service of Jesus Christ. 

-Lisa Sloan 



WITH POPCORM AND COKE TO START THE TYPI 
CAL SMALL GROUP MEETING, leaders Barbara Kelley 
and Pete Neefus direct the weekly discussion and make 
plans for outside service activities and gatherings 




Organizations 81 



The Triumph Of Competition 



The Davidson Debate program has come a 
long way since the days of arguing back and 
forth between Eu and Phi Halls. It used to be 
no one would show up in foul weather. That 
meant no debating in the winter. Balmy 
spring afternoons and the lure of the lake left 
only the fall, rendering debate even more sea- 
sonal than field hockey. But, nowadays, a 
much more civilized team exercises its skills 
indoors, behind a podium and with quite im- 
pressive results. The Debate Team this year 
travelled to a total of seven tournaments, two 
of them in Maryland. The year began with a 
trip to the Johns Hopkins Debate Tournament 
in Baltimore. The team of Bobby Ervin and 
Bryan Duke advanced as far as the semi- 
finals, on their way defeating a powerful Se- 
ton Hall team, before being bested themselves 




by Wooster College. 

At the Appalachian State Tournament the 
team returned triumphant with first place in 
Traditional debate competition and 3rd place 
in CETA Debate competition. Bobby Ervin 
and Marvin Overby took the first place trophy 
with Overby winning top honors as the tour- 
nament's number one speaker in that compe- 
tition. In CETA debate competition the team 
of Sherburne Laughlin and Tracy Thompson 
won third place with Laughlin taking a second 
place Speaker trophy. The novice team of 
Mary Fant and Jim Morgan advanced to the 
quarterfinals. In the Old Dominion Debate 
Tournament, Sherman Allen and Joe Calvin 
advanced to the semifinal round before ac 
cepting defeat. 

The team concluded its season by winning 
the Debate Sweepstakes trophy at the Caroli- 
na Forensics Association Tournament held at 
Appalachian State University. The teams of 
Allen-Fant and Ervin-Duke tied for the first 
place award in Debate competition. Allen was 
the division's first place speaker, Ervin sec- 
ond, and Duke third. 

Manned chiefly by juniors and sophomores, 
the Debate Team, coach Jean Cornell, and 
graduate student assistants INancy Northcott 
and Gordon Wedenhouse look forward to an 
even more successful 1981-82 season. 

-Bryan Duke 

"I AGREE WITH YOG COMPLETELY. HOWEVER 

Sherman Allen offers fiis rebuttal at a practice session on 
campus 

ILLUSTRATING THE NECESSARY ELEMENTS OF 
CONTEMPLATION AND SATISFACTION IN DEBATE. 

Bobby Ervin and Marvin Overby are prepared for action. 




i-'*^V 



^ 



DEBATE TEAM: Mary Fant, Bobby Ervin, Marvin 
Overby, Bryan Duke. 



82 STUDENT LIFE 



v^l 



r 



Davidson continues 



The Traditional Societies 



The ten o'clock hour has but one meaning 
to most students — mail call. The lure of the 
empty box is irresistable. At first just a trick- 
le, by 9:55 a tumultuous river of flesh winds 
its way between Eu and Phi Halls, unaware 
that it momentarily recreates another even 
more traditional scene. Everyone, thanks to 
Chalmers, knows that early Davidson stu- 
dents used to gather periodically between the 
buildings and judge debaters as they hurled 
gentlemanly abuse from one balcony to the 
other. But few today realize just how impor 
tant these two organizations were. Founded in 
1837, the Eumenean and the Philanthropic 
Societies are the oldest student organizations 
at the college. They at one time conducted 
most of the social and student government- 
related activities on campus. The Philanthrop- 
ic Society seeks to enrich the minds of its 
members. Its intent, as stated in the preamble 
to the constitution, is "to pursue the study of 
rhetoric, logic, and ethics, to promote a spirit 
of subordination to law and order by engen 
dering a high regard for virtue and truth." In 
keeping with this aim, the Phi Society has this 
year heard addresses from faculty, adminis 
tration, and from outside the college commu 
nity on such varied topics as world econom- 
ics, group rights, and Edvard Munch. 

The Eumenean Society, on the other hand, 
was originally a social and forensics club, to 



which all out-of-state students at Davidson 
belonged. Woodrow Wilson was a member 
during his aborted tenure here. The Eu Soci- 
ety has recently witnessed lean years; It al- 
most withered away entirely in the early 
1970's. In 1980, a revised constitution was 
adapted, several new members were elected, 
and the Eumenean society undertook its stat 
ed aims: to provide a forum for speakers, to 
stimulate discussion and debate, and to revile 
the Phi Society, its inveterate rival. 

John Davis and Howard Browne 




EaWENEArn society: Ann Parker, Lindsey Robert 
son, Ed Garnet, Stuart Baskin, Mike Kehs, Marvin 
Overby. Howard Browne 




PHILANTHROPIC SOCIETY: (Row 1) Howard 
Browne. Rob Campany, Trey Thies. (Row 2) Peter 
Beard. John Robbins. Tom Roth, Mike Kehs, Brent 



Hilleary. Sherman Allen (Last Row| Stokes Peebles. 
Larry Jones. Gregg Smart. Jim Brown. Tim New 
combe. Doug Shanks. 



Organizations 83 





THE FIRST GRADOATING CLASS of Stuart Scholars, 
Mark Thomas. David Waddill, Renee Hedgepeth. Linda 
Hoopes. Diana Pierce. Esther Bruce, and Ray Craven, had 
dinner with menribers of the Stuart family during Gradu 
ation Weekend in May. 




N.C. FELLOWS: (front row) Jim Tholen. Daniel Ettedgui. 
Lindsey Robertson; (Back row) Brad Kerr, Diane Odom, 
Rick Gergoudis, Bobby Ervin 



84 STUDENT LIFE 



The Cultivation Of Leaders 



The daily jaunt to the post office inevitably 
takes one past Phi Hall, one of the oldest 
structures on campus. Residing in the bottom 
floor of Phi Hall are the Morth Carolina Fel 
lows and Stuart Scholars, two of the newest 
structures on campus. 

The North Carolina Fellows Program was 
founded in 1967 by the Richardson Founda- 
tion for the purpose of recognizing and devel- 
oping leadership qualities in college students. 
As the name suggests, the program is limited 
exclusively to the State of North Carolina; 
Davidson is one of four colleges and universa- 
ties which participates in the Fellows Pro- 
gram, among which also include North Caroli- 

ir^VOLVEMENT is an important factor in the Stuart 
Scholarship competition Freshman Mary Tabb does her 
part for Davidson by participating in Y Corp activities. 




na State, Duke University, and the University 
of North Carolina at Chapel Hill. 

Originally, selection for the N.C. Fellows 
Program was carried out during winter terms 
of a student's freshman year. The selection 
was open to any freshman or new transfer 
student; there were no other requirements. 
Each student filled out an application and 
went through three interviews in the first 
stage of the selection process. From these 
students, a group of finalists was chosen. The 
finalists went through two days of extensive 
interviews, resulting in the selection of be- 
tween eight and twelve North Carolina Fel- 
lows. 

The N.C. Fellows Program ran up against 
some rough times beginning in the fall of 
1979, however, and things seem to have gone 
downhill ever since. In 1979, the Richardson 
Foundation, the organization which funded 
the Fellows Program, announced that it could 
no longer afford to support the North Carolina 
Fellows Program — an announcement which 
resulted in the termination of selecting new 
classes of N.C. Fellows. The program had 
been centered around bi-monthly luncheons 
with local and national business leaders and 
supplemented by participation in the center 
for Creative Leadership Conferences and 
some funding for summer internships; all of 
these programs were continued as in years 
past despite the inability to choose a new 
Fellows class. Then in the Spring of 1980, 
another barrier confronted the Davidson N.C. 
Fellows Program: the three year directorship 
of the Fellows Program ran out. Dr. John 
Kello had been the director of the program, 
assisted by Mrs. Louise Martin. It was under 
the direction of Kello and Martin that the bi- 
monthly luncheons, the organization factor of 
the N.C. Fellows Program, had been a benefi- 
cial success. The Dean of Student's Office took 
over the direction of the Fellows Program this 
fall, in 1980. A few feeble attempts were 
made at continuing the luncheons, but be- 
cause of poor organization and a complete 
lack of leadership-building intent, the lun- 
cheons failed to be productive. The N.C. Fel- 
lows, did, however, send students to the Cre- 
ative Leadership Conference and did finance 
summer interships despite the group's failure 
to meet on a bi-monthly basis throughout the 
year. 

Louise Martin, one of the Program's origi- 

INSTRUMEtHTAL IN BRINGING PRESIDENT GERALD 
FORD TO CAMPOS were David Waddill and the Stuart 
Scholarship Program 



nal director, is still hopeful that the Program 
can be saved. She has been in search of a new 
funding organization since the Richardson 
Foundation stopped the flow of funds in 1979. 
If no new financial backer for a student leader- 
ship development program is found, however, 
the N.C. Fellows Program will assuredly die 
and depart from the Davidson campus with 
the graduation of the N.C. Fellows in the class 
of 1982. 

The Stuart Scholars, housed and often af- 
filiated with the N.C. Fellows, have been gain- 
ing much support during the time that the 
Fellows Program has been suffering a slow 
death. The Edward Crosland Stuart Scholar- 
ship Program officially began in 1977 when 
eight Stuart Scholars were chosen for the 
class of 1981 (two full scholarships and six 
partial scholarships). 

The Stuart Scholarship Program is run by a 
board of five directors and chaired by Mr 
Seddon Goode. of Charlotte, North Carolina 
Each year, the Board reads approximately 
200 applications for the four scholarship posi- 
tions (the Board changed the program to in- 
clude four full-scholarships following the first 
year of the program's existence). To be eligi- 
ble for the scholarship, a student must first be 
recommended by his high school. From the 
200 original applicants, the Board selects fifty 
semi-finalists, who come to Davidson's cam- 
pus in late winter for the competition. The 
students go through individual and group in- 
terviews, and from these, sixteen finalists are 
chosen. The finalists are invited back to cam 
pus in early Spring, and the four Stuart Schol 
ars are chosen from among these students 

In addition to her involvement with the N.C 
Fellows. Louise Martin is the campus Coor 
dinator of the Stuart Program, and she is also 
one of the five-member Board of Directors. 
Mrs. Martin organizes speakers' luncheons for 
the Stuart Scholars, and she works to place 
Stuart Scholars in summer internship posi 
tions. 

Once chosen as scholarship winners, the 
Stuart Scholars have no defined obligation to 
Davidson; however, the Scholarship is renew- 
able but not guaranteed. Each Scholar must 
come up before the Board of Directors at the 
end of each school year for an assessment of 
his progress, contributions, and goals at Da 
vidson. The Stuart Scholars are also expected 
to act as hosts during the selection of new 
scholarship winners each year. 

-Diane Odom 



Organizations 85 



WOMEN'S CENTER: (Row 1) Karen Hester, Aurie Hall, 
Sue Ross, Katherine Allen, Whitlow Wampler, (Last Row) 
Sally Sharp, Anne Stanback. Kim Scott, 




Davidson focuses on 

Women 

The purpose of the Women's Center is to 
serve all women at Davidson by supporting 
their personal growth and by encouraging in- 
quiry into issues which directly affect wom- 
en. The Center seeks to promote emotional 
and political development by providing a 
meeting place, resources, and progressive 
programming. 

Seven women live in the upstairs of the 
Center while the downstairs is open to all 
students. 

With no budget, the Women's Center Board 
managed to solicit money for major speakers 
including Susan Lurie, poet and author from 
Berkeley, California and NASA scientist Lau- 
rel Wilkening. They also cosponsored Duke 
Law professor William Van Alstyne who 
spoke on the legal implications of the Equal 
Rights Amendment. 

The Women's Center organized more infor 
mal events such as a reception for new wom 
en faculty and staff, the showing of severa 
films, and discussions on topics such as wom 
en's studies, human sexuality and birth con 
trol. An ongoing project is the collection and 
availability of information and books about 
women in the library of the Center. 

Seven women were chosen to live in the 
Center during '81-'82 on the basis of an appli 
cation and interview. 

-Karen Hester 



W^' 



;'^*oi'; 



^^^^^" I 




\ 






86 STUDENT LIFE 



Promoting Cultural Pride 



The Black Student Coalition, composed of 
the Black students of Davidson College and 
any other interested parties, seeks through its 
various activities to preserve the pride and 
dignity of the students and to insure that our 
cultural heritage is remembered, preserved 
and maintained. The organizations purpose is 
to establish and maintain a spirit of solidarity 
among Black students, to create a sense of 
awareness at Davidson College of the contri- 
butions of Black students to the college com- 
munity and the black experience in this coun- 
try, to reach out to the Davidson community 
in any way possible and to provide a social 
and cultural outlet for Black students. To 
achieve these goals, the Black Student Coali- 
tion sponsors discussions, speakers, forums, 
parties, art shows, poetry readings, and other 
social programs. Further, the Black Student 
Coalition is active in minority recruitments at 
the College, sponsors community projects, 
and provides programs to further our careers, 
such as luncheons with area businessmen. 
The Coalition has a gospel group which sings 

ENTERTAINED BY ONE OF THE MANY CGLTCRAL 
EVENTS SPONSORED BY THE BSC. Yvette Mingo and 
John Eley watch dancing in the 900 Room. 



at area churches and for other college pro- 
grams. The Black Student Coalition wants not 
only to increase campus wide sensitivity to 
the Black experience but to increase interac- 
tion between Black and White students. 

-Vincent Parker 



I lii ii 





PERFORMING DORING THE BSC COLTGRAL ARTS 
AND BLACK HISTORY WEEK. Kenny Wilson enter 
tained and educated many students. 




BLACK STUDENT COALITION: (Row 1) Kay Boyd. Ga 
briella Robinson. Harriet Gaston. Aaron Rollins. Alan Ro- 
sier. Vanessa Adams, Keith Ellis. (Row 2) Ray Sinclair. 
Anne Elliot, Mitzi Short, Gifford Piercy, Kenny Wilson. 



Brian Rowan. Alvin Atkinson, Andre Kennebrew. (Last 
Row) Billy Price. Leonard Walker. Michael Jones. Ken 
drick Williams. Orin Loftin, Charles Hooks 



Organizations 87 



EMT: Skip Brown, Walter Lee, Lisa Young, Don Mat- 
thews, and Bill Dascombe 




.„^£i^'W 



Booze Keeps Bleepers Busy 



The Emergency Medical Team, organized 
and run by students, provides immediate 
medical assistance for students injured on 
campus. Don Matthews heads the EMT 
group, which is staffed by Jane Daniels, Skip 
Brown, Bill Dascomb, Lisa Young, Walter Lee, 
Jim Whalen and Jeff Trawick. 

Eligibility for the squad is not based on 
certification in emergency medicine but on 
strength of interest. One half of the present 
squad is qualified by certificate, and some of 
the others are taking summer courses for cer- 
tification. Because they work in teams, how- 
ever, it is not necessary for them all to be 
certified emergency medical technicians. 

The team works closely with the infirmary 
and the campus police. Each individual is on 
call about one week in every four, during 
which time he must remain within a certain 
radius of the campus; a team can usually 
arrive at the scene of the injury in less than 
five minutes. 

The large majority of the EMT's calls result 
from injuries caused by alchohol abuse; al- 
choholrelated situations encountered by this 
year's EMT squad have ranged from a stu- 
dent falling off an eating house, to a student 
being karateed in the head. A quick mind and 
a clear head are necessary to handle these 

PREPARED FOR ANY EVENTUALITY. Skip Brown with 
his EMT tool-kit on the scene of an outdoor accident 



88 STCJDENT LIFE 



emergencies, and the dedication of those stu 
dents who devote their time and energy to 
assisting their fellow students is an invaluable 
gift to the College community. 

— Lisa Sloan 





DICKERING is not the usual method of determining book 
prices at APO used book sale as Brad Kerr purchases 
books from Cindy Clark. 





I 



Scouting Sheds Its Shorts 



To most Davidson students, the initials 
APO stand for only one thing — cheap books. 
Actually the Nu Chi chapter of Alpha Phi 
Omega, a national coed service fraternity, 
has its hand in a number of campus activities, 
providing many necessary services, and help- 
ing other organizations to carry out various 
projects. 

During the past year, members worked 
with the SGA to set up a Rides Board in the 
Student Union, coordinated a Community 
Work Day with other campus groups, and 



helped WDAV with its mailing list. APO also 
helps the Registrar's Office at registration 
time, and the Alumni Office wnenever they 
are especially busy. The (Jgliest Man on Cam- 
pus Contest, one of the group's most enjoy- 
able projects, raises money each year for a 
specified charity. Founded originally as an 
outgrowth of the Boy Scouts of America, 
members of APO pledge to promote a spirit of 
friendship, leadership and service. 

— Joan Redding 



"CHECKING" booths from APO is easy; however. Visa. 
MasterCard, and American Express are not accepted 
Elizabeth McMillan seems elated at her sale of used 
books. 





A. i RAISiN 



PDJIiii 



SMILING FACES of Sue Buchanan and Leslie Mills at- 
tract freshmen to the APO booth at the Activities Fair in 
the early fall. 



Organizations 89 



Political a mi mi lui im i^i i 

Activity 

Affects 

Campus Life 



1980 being an election year, the college 
political groups were kept very busy, particu- 
larly during fall term. The College Republi 
cans were active in Jim Martin's campaign 
for Congress in both Charlotte and Davidson. 
Many members worked at the Charlotte head- 
quarters in both Reagan's and Bush's primary 
campaigns. The club then gave its full sup- 
port to Reagan after the primaries. This club 
was the largest ever, under the leadership of 
president Peter Hairston, vice president 
Charles Douglas, and Treasurer Elliott 
Stotler. 

The Davidson chapter of the College Demo- 
crats was involved in a range of campaign 
activities during the 1980 elections. Members 
participated as a group in phone canvassing, 
hauling, leaflet drops, and other traditional 
political activities. Individual members served 
as campaign coordinators for Democratic 
presidential, congressional, and gubernatiorial 
candidates. The Davidson Chapter played an 
active role in the statewide organization and 
members served on a number of state com- 
mittees. In the spring, a delegation traveled to 
the College Federation State Convention. The 
officers were Bobby Ervin, president; Bryan 
Collins, vice president; Paul Baynard, secre- 
tary-treasurer; and Mott McDonald, state ex- 
ecutive committee member. 

A group of Libertarians also actively cam- 
paigned for Ed Clark for President. 

•Caroline Boudreau 




COLLEGE REPUBLICANS: (Row 1) Randy Stroud. Scott 
Otto. Brent Hilleary. (Last Row) Carl Anderson. Jeb Bene 
diet, Anne Goodwin. Doug Wiley. 



AS CONTROVERSY ARISES DaRING A MEETING OF 
THE COLLEGE DEMOCRATS. Bryan Collins, Mott Mc- 
Donald, and Scott Eblin good naturedly defend their posi- 
tion 



90 STUDENT LIFE 




COLLEGE DEMOCRATS: (Row I) Joanna Hunt. Barry 
Mack Mott McDonald. Margaret Ervin (Last Row) Shcrn 
Frajit-r. Jim Reese. Paul Baynard. Bobby Frvin, Bryan 
Collins Hunter Monroe. Scott Fblin 




O' 



Organizations 91 



A Breaking 

Out Of New 

Opportunities 

Hidden away in some relatively un- 
explored region of the (Jnion one 
stumbles across the Outing Club 
closet, which to most students re- 
mains an uncharted and unsought lo- 
cale. But, for others, perhaps more 
fortunate, it has become a source of 
delight and adventure. The primary 
objective of the Outing Club is to 
offer students the chance to use out- 
door equipment and enjoy the plea- 
sures of camping, canoeing and 
climbing without having to buy their 
own gear. 

Beyond merely checking equip- 
ment in and out, the Club organizes 
trips and clinics that benefit the be- 
ginner as well as the seasoned out- 
doorsman. Trips the Club has orga- 
nized this year have included climb- 
ing clinics to Crowder's Mountain 
and Looking Glass Mountain, hikes 
through the Pisgah INational Forest 
along the Art Loeb Trail, a surfing 
trip to Cape Hatteras, and a trip to 
the Linville George Wilderness Area. 

Student Involvement has in- 
creased in the spring under the direc- 
tion of junior Mark Elmore. Several 
members have graciously shared 
their unique experiences with the en- 
tire student body in the form of slide 
presentations given in the 900 Room. 
John Shaw, for example, recounted 
his visit to New Zealand and Austra- 
lia, while Eric Long and Tom Pafford 
described life at an Alaskan fishery. 
The club has also offered a number 
of student directed clinics in first aid 
and climbing. With the increasing 
student interest in the Club, it hopes 
to broaden its program to include at 
least four trips per term for faculty 
and students and offer more profes 
sional instruction in outdoor skills by 
having outings with other colleges. 
■Mark Elmore 

FEATURED ItS ONE OF THE OUTING 
CLUB'S MEETINGS. Tom Marshburn shows 
slides of his hiking trip this fall along the Pacif 
ic Crest Trail. 




IN THE TRADITIONAL DAVIDSON FASHION, this 
\ears Outing Club tube trip was cancelled because of 
weather, 

BEWILDERED LOOKING BUT DEDICATED. Mark El 
more headed up this year's Outing Club. 




92 STUDENT LIFE 




Invading Public Interest 



MAKING MEASUREMENTS FOR ONE OF PIRG'S 
»HANY ACTIVITIES. Drew Davis worked conscientiously 
ill year. 



The rSorth Carolina Public Interest Re 
search Group (MC PIRG) is a student directed, 
professionally staffed organization — one 
which seeks solutions to consumer and envi 
ronmental problems through research and ad 
vocacy. Established in 1972, NC PIRG is cur 
rently supported by contributions from stu 
dents at Davidson College. Duke University. 
St. Andrews College. Wake Forest University. 
(J rnC Greensboro, Elon College, and Guilford 
College. 

As a campus based organization, NC PIRG 
has two broad purposes: 

1) By encouraging students to become in 
volved with actual problems facing their com 
munity or state, MC PIRG helps expand the 
context for learning and make education 
more relevant. Through work on real world 
problems, students learn important citizen 
ship skills and transform their concern for 
social issues into constructive social change 

2) A student directed PIRG provides a 
strong, independent voice for the public inter 
est when important economic and govern 
mental decisions are made — a voice backed 
by the expertise and resources need to be 
effective on complex issues. 

NC PIRG utilizes the combined resources of 
students and a professional staff to research 
and analyze issues affecting the welfare of 
North Carolina citizens, and to construct and 
advocate new policy when it is needed. The 
research is made manifest in the form of lob 
bying efforts, litigation, and consumer aware 
ness campaigns. Students develop substan 
tial knowledge on key concerns of the com- 
munity, and in doing so, help direct the re 
sources of the university toward solving the 



major problems of its community and state. 

Toxic wastes and energy conservation 
highlighted the list of project issues during 
this past year for Davidson PIRG. The Toxic 
Waste Forum brought in experts to discuss 
with students how society creates hazardous 
materials — from chemical wastes to sewage 
sludge and what we must do to minimize and 
safely handle them. Folow up work is being 
continued in cooperation with the Mecklen- 
burg County Toxic Waste Task Force, spon- 
sored by the League of Women Voters. 

An extensive energy conservation survey 
of college-owned housing showed how David- 
son can save resources and money by plug- 
ging energy leaks A report to the college 
trustees urges improved insulation, weather- 
stripping, and other simple saving measures. 

Conservation issues in the Morth Carolina 
legislature also occupied student attention. 
PIRG students wrote letters and sponsored 
programs on the "bottle bill" (which would 
place a minimum deposit on all soft drink and 
beer containers) and utility rate reform. By 
encouraging the reuse and recycling of bever- 
age containers, a "bottle bill" deposit will pre- 
vent litter and save resources. 

PIRG also researched information on voter 
registration and absentee ballots, which was 
published in the Davidsonian before the Na- 
tional elections. PIRG students finished an ac- 
tive year by cosponsoring (with NOW and the 
Pre-Law Club) the talks of Duke University 
law professor Dr. Van Alstyne on the First 
Amendment and the Equal Rights Amend- 
ment. 

-Dan Besse 




^- i r^ERGY CONSERVATION RE 
iGt HOUSING. Pete Gulyn collects 



PIRG: Drew Davis. Robbie Singleton. Guest Speaker. 
Geoff Little. Chris Gunn. 



Organizations 93 



Psych club develops 

The Complex Of 
Happiness 

Steeped in a tradition of white rats and 
Skinner bones, the psychology club is not for 
the faint of heart. The group is located in 
Chambers' "other" basement, and revolves 

ENJOYING THE COMPANY OF HIS STUDENTS. Pro 

fessor Brockway discusses with psych majors Gus Robin 
son and Jaime King, 




around a weekly Coffee and Coke hour 
held on Tuesdays. In order to learn of the 
proceedings of these meetings, one must 
attend, although it is rumored that not all 
non-members who enter are seen to 
emerge. Those who do often seem to have 
acquired certain peculiarities, or so it is 
said. 

Aside from the weekly "Happy Hour", 
the psych club has engaged in a number of 
other activities this year, some of which 
may be revealed to the public. The first 
annual Willy Wundt Birthday Party was 
held in the fall. Willy Wundt. most believe, 
is the father of modern psychology. Fea- 
tured at the party were beer and the movie 
"Larry", which delineated the return of a 
normal man, raised as retarded, to society. 
At another function. Dr. Gordon Rettke, a 
Charlotte hypnotherapist, gave a lecture 
on the uses of hypnosis. He then proceed- 
ed to demonstrate, using soothing words 
and suggestions. His first attempt, with 
subject Bun Walter, was a rousing success. 
On a second try, however, the good doctor 
attempted to put one over on the entire 
group, but the pscyhology club refused to 
be soothed. Perhaps the earlier success 
owed something to Bun's natural state, 
which reports have is closer to the hypnot 
ic trance than not. 

Throughout the year, the club spon 
sored colloquiums on learning processes 
and child altruisim, and members ended 
1980-81 with a cookout and a furiously 
contested softball game. 



■Sally Meal & Karen Welty 




PSYCHOLOGY CLUB: (Row 1) Jamie King. Lucy Phil 
lips. Pat McKinsey. Laura Lacy. (Row 2) Melissa Peacock. 
Prof Ault. Bryna Watson. Shannon Walters. Lisa Lawler. 
Linda Hoopes. Karen Johnson (Last 



Row) Prof. Rowe. Prof. Palmer, Gus Robinson. Alex 
McCallie. Warner Hall. Chris Tiernan. Georgeanne 
Vagt. Johnnie Edwards. William Holloman. Mark 
Sheffield. Prof. Brockway 




AMUSED BY HER FELLOW BIO MAJORS. Margaret 

Kans spent an afternoon of connpanionship and eating at 
the biology clubs end of the year picnic. 




CONFUSED BY THE ABSENCE OF RAIN AT A DAVID- 
SON PICNIC. Nancy Cornwell attends the biology picnic. 



94 STUDENT LIFE 



Biological Activity 'Cultures' Students 



"Way over on the far side of campus, be- 
tween tfie Union and DCPC, stands one of tfie 
most loved and feared buildings on campus. 
Tfie words "Dana" range across its portals. 
Ttnis structure, commonly referred to as tfie 
Bio building — the Physics department to an 
elite few — houses one of the most active 
groups on campus, a group that unfortunate 
ly suffers from a lack of exposure and a con 
sequently diminishing membership This or 
ganization is the Biology Society, a group of 
students who share an interest in biology be 



BIOLOGY CLUB: (Row I) Nancy Cornwell. Hope McArn. 
Lynn Peace. Margaret Karis. Sluarl Tinkler (Row 2) Da 
vid McLean, Danny Klinar, Michelle Creel, Pam Gregg. 



yond the fields that Davidson has to offer. 
Under the leadership of president Margaret 
Karis, vice-president Jane Daniel, and secre 
tarytreasurer Shera Alford, the club offers, 
with the help of advisors David Grant and 
Jerry Putnam, a series of biweekly seminars 
conducted by well known scientists for the 
surrounding area. 

The society began its year with a tour of 
the McGuire Muclear Plant and an accompa 
nying lecture on the benefits of nuclear ener 
gy. Later in the year the group heard a com 



Ralph Mosca. Nancy Wright. Trina Lammers. (Last Row) 
Dave Roberts. Don Matthews. Craig Morrey. Robert 
Steele 




panion lecture dealing with alternate forms of 
energy. One of the most popular seminars 
was that on birds of prey, given by Steve 
Longenecker. during which society members 
had the opportunity to handle and feed live 
birds. Other topics ranged from the Galapa- 
gos Islands to Rocky Mountain Spotted Fever 
to coastal and estuarine fish ecology. Spring 
term brought a visit to the North Carolina Zoo 
and a lecture on the differences in veterinary 
care between domestic and exotic zoo ani- 
mals. 

Society member Jamie Brown made espe- 
cially good use of the seminar schedule. After 
a lecture on the genetic control of develop- 
mental and malignant processes, she ap 
proached the speaker. Dr. Michael Dewey of 
(JSC. regarding possible summer employ 
ment opportunities. As a result of her initia- 
tive. Jamie obtained a summer job in Dr. 

'wey's research laboratory. 

At the end of winter term, the Biology Soci- 
ety was involved in choosing the new chair- 
men of the department, hosting lectures giv- 
en by candidates for the position. One crowd- 
ed week, members attended four of these. 
The club ended the year with a picnic at 
Erwin Lodge honoring current chairmen Dr. 
Tom Daggy, who retired this past year after 
thirty-four years of teaching at Davidson. 

-Margaret Karis, Karen Welty 



DURING THE PICNIC IN HONOR OF RETIRING DR. 
DAGGY, Dr Lammers makes a presentation to the distin 
guished professor 



I 



r-j^ 







Juggling 

Juggling remains an unexploited sport 
on campus. With none of the commercial 
entanglements common to intercollegiate 
and professional athletics, the small band 
of Davidson jugglers practice their skills 
with individual fervor. Gatherings on 
Wednesday nights from 7 to 9 p.m. allow 
the observation of other practitioners and 
interaction vital to personal achievement. 
Comfortably environed in the high-cei- 
linged, well lighted, softly-carpeted Morri- 
son Room of the Union, the jugglers toss 
and drop to heart's content. Passersby 
look in and marvel; a few enter to try. All 
are welcome, and lessons are free. Many 
have been surprised to find how easily the 
threeball basics of the skill can be mas 
tered. Invariably, each trick accomplished 
tempts one to try others. As balls become 
as easy to juggle as air to breathe, people 
pick up other exotic items from the floor to 
uncover the secrets of their rhythm as 
well. Scarves will float effortlessly, pins 
will twirl dazzingly and boxes click endless- 




THE JOGGLING CLUB attracted participation by citi 
zens of the Town as well as Davidson students and 
professors 

FOOR-PIN JUGGLING requires every bit of senior 
David Hoskin's concentration Hoskins was one of 
tfie more advanced members of tfie Juggling Club 



96 STUDENT LIFE 



Capers 

ly for those who care to learn. As the 
rhythm of the three ball cascade slows 
down with its intimate knowledge, jugglers 
test their reflexes and patience with four 
and five. When one tires of juggling alone, 
refreshment can be found in passing ob- 
jects with others. Confidence and skill 
grown with each workout. The lesson 
learned is that there is no limit to either! 



■Bill Giduz 



DOUBLE JUGGLE: Juggling Club organizer and teacher 
Bill Giduz, of the Communications Department, luggles 
rinqs with one of his students. 



900 Room Hosts Linquists 



It's Tuesday night at about 10:00 p.m. 
The 900 Room is beginning to fill up with 
its usual crowd of E.H. Little Library 
Runaways. Students crowd around the ta 
bles, three and four to a group, and talk of 
the events of the week. One table in the 
corner seems to be attracting more visitors 



SLIDE PRESENTATIOfHS were part of the German 
Club's activities Mark Burris and Paul Griffith enjoy a 
slide show on Germany presented by club member Phil 
Howerton 




than the others, however. As the size of the 
crowd around this table grows, so does the 
noise level in the table's vicinity, and upon 
close observation, one notices that the ris- 
ing voices are not speaking the English 
language, but are, instead, speaking in Ger- 
man. 

This German gathering is far from coin- 
cidental; students of all levels of German 
met regularly this year for what they called 
"Stammtisch", the chance to practice 
practical German conversation in a casual 
setting outside the classroom. The gather- 
ings were student-run, usually being orga- 
nized by German major and former JYA 
participant, James Baskin. The group had 
a regular following which included, among 
eager American students. Suzi Klaus, the 
German exchange student, and Dr. Hans- 
ford Epes. Professor of German. 

As empty pitchers of beer began to 
stack up on the table, tongues began to 
wag a little freer and with a little more 
virility. PSo one, despite his level of German 
proficiency, could be intimidated by this 
group. The more advanced, more fluent 
students, helped the beginning German 
students, and everyone, at some point or 
another, anagonized over how to express a 
certain concept in a foreign language. 
Aside from the 900 Room meetings, the 
group also had periodic slide shows on Ger- 
many, presented by the students. Future 
JYA-Germany students found the meetings 
very beneficial for preparation for their fu- 
ture year abroad. 

-Diane Odom 




GERMAN CLUB: (Front row) Mark Burns. Tim Brother- 
ton. Suzi Klaus. Fred Broadwell. Stokes Peebles: (Back 
row) Professor Hansford Epes. Carolyn Scott. Phil Hower 



ton, James Baskin, Paul Griffith. Laurie Noto. Mark Phil 
lips. John Chidsey. 



ORGANIZATIONS 97 



Heroes In Hand-Me-Downs 




The year 1980-81 was marked by contro- 
versy and confusion in the Athletic Depart 
ment. Although the dismissal of Head Basket- 
ball Coach Eddie Biedenbach and the ensuing 
coaching scramble topped headlines, several 
perennial Departmental problems went al- 
most unnoticed. Of these annual quarrels, the 
debate between major sports and minor 
sports has long loomed large. 

To begin with, I should outline the several 
diversified schools that base their concerns 
on spending in the Athletic Department. First, 
and perhaps foremost in the college media, 
are those persons who feel that less money 
would be put into the Athletic Department 
and subsequently the INCAA Division 1 teams 
should be scaled down to Division II. Ill, or 
MAIA The middle-of-the-roaders feel that 
things are just fine the way they are. That 
leaves others like me. who feel that more 
money should be pumped into the Depart 
ment or at the very least, the budget should 
be left alone and the Athletic Department 
should cut down on some of the awful waste 
that goes on in the confines of Johnston Gym. 

The last point is entirely defensible. Not too 
many people outside the boundaries of INorth 
Carolina, including 18year old prospective 
students, have heard of Davidson College. 
Ten years ago. when Davidson had a Top 
Twenty basketball team, no one faced the 
"I'm going to Davidson" — "You're going 
where?" situation that Davidson College stu- 
dents are up against today. Athletics are so in 
the limelight today that they bring a school 
prominence that educational prowess cannot. 
A name that is known attracts students of all 
calibers from which a better class may be 
chosen. 

A decade ago. the Davidson basketball 
team was able to pack the Coliseum with 
screaming, sellout crowds of basketball fanat- 
ics Contrast that with the tomb the team 
plays in today. Sellouts and near sellouts 
bring in money. At an average of five dollars a 
head for an average crowd of 9.000 (the Coli- 
seum holds 10.666), game income would be 
S45,000 per game, and for six Coliseum 
games the school would bring in S270.000. 
Last year's game income was SI 00.000. Sub- 
traction yields $170,000 (not including home 
games) to be put back into the program. And 
that doesn't even touch what NBC will pay to 

UNDER THE LIGHTS OF JOHNSTON GYMNASIUM. 
Rith DiBendetto goes up tor a rebound in one of the 
several games held in Davidson s gym during Ihe I9808I 
season The basketball team, one of the two highly fund 
.d sports programs at Davidson, no longer attracts Ihe 
.ludiences and national attention that it did during the 
.-.irK 70s 



98 STUDENT LIFE 



televise good college basketball which Is, 
again, more recognition. 

All of the above discourse may seem irrele- 
vant to the furor between minor and major 
sports, but it proves two points. Athletics are 
important, and they augment the school with 
the tangible — money, and the intangibles — 
recognition and scholastic pride. But just how 
important are the two big-money sports, bas 
ketball and football, in relation to the rest? 

The Athletic Department budget smacks of 
inequity. Sixty seven cents of every athletic 
dollar goes to either football or basketball. 
Subtracting about ten cents for Physical Edu 
cation, approximately one quarter is left to be 
split up among ten other sports. That's just 
not fair. 

(Incidentally, all the numbers herein are 
from the 1979 80 budget report). 

For the most part, there is only one reason 
for the lack of funding in small sports. They 
don't bring in money (not that football and 
basketball revenues could buy out Fort Knox, 
either, with their total of S 163.000 income). 
The supposition that basketball and football 
are the only breadwinners among sports is as 
much a fairy tale as the supposition that a 
wife cant bring in the bacon for a household. 
Any championship program will bring in men 
ey, regardless of the sport. 

There is, for nearly every sport, a school 
somewhere that excels In the sport and draws 
for it. Long dwarfed by mens basketball, 
women's basketball Is surfacing as an attrac- 
tion. The University of Tennessee, Old Domln- 

EMPTY STArHDS are an expected sighl at Davidson 
Inter Collegiate baseball games Where schools such as 
Arizona Slate and the University of Southern California 



ion University and tiny Stephen F. Austin Col 
lege have long been raking in dollars with 
consistently exceptional women's hardwood 
teams. The University of Florida and Texas 
pack their natatoriums for swim meets, how 
ever, at Davidson, students have had no 
chance for exposure to the excitement of 
swimming because of the lack of an Olympic 
sized pool on campus. How many people are 
going to drive to Charlotte for a sport to 
which they've had little or no exposure? Wres 
tling programs at the powerhouse Midwestern 
schools such as Oklahoma, Iowa, and MIssou 
ri have long been packing gymnasiums. Base 
ball fills grandstands at Arizona State and the 
University of Southern California. The only 
common denominator among this fame Is 
that each school devoted time, money, and 
people to developing a championship team in 
some sports program that is considered out 
ofthe-way at Davidson. 

Davidson, too, could build up a winning 
program in any sport with those three ingredi 
ents. It takes a few years, a few scholarships 
and a few good coaches to build a champion 
ship sport. Davidson has many good coaches 
and It has as much time as the next school 
but the College is either unwilling or unable to 
put money into the minor sports programs. 

A look at the money allotted to the major 
sports for scholarship and recruiting as op 
posed to the minor sports clearly Illustrates 
where the inequity lies. For recruiting alone, 
football and basketball are budgeted in the 

Continued on Page 100 

fill grandstands with their baseball programs. Davidsons 
poorly-funded, poorly publicized baseball attracts few 
spectators 







,f 



EXTREME CONCENTRATIOti is necessary for captain 

Stuart Baskin and his Skipper. Kathleen Huff Davidsons 

mailing program is one of the school s 'minor varsity 

sports 




TRACK STAND-OUT Ban Lanjc^s e.vcelled both on the 
track and on the cross country trails during the Spring 
and Fall seasons Both sports suffered this year from the 
lack of funds and coaching assistance 



Sports 99 



Heroes In Hand-Me-Downs 



neighborhood of $110,000. To be divided 
among the dozen or so minor sports is a grand 
total of $4,353. The Georgia Tech Lacrosse 
Club gets more than double that alone! This is 
not unfair or unjust, this is degrading. Each 
minor sports coach at Davidson has money 
enough to get mail out to "recruits," and little 
else. All a small sports coach can really offer 
is a good education and a chance to partici- 
pate in a collegiate sport. 

Where minor sports coaches are licking en 
velopes, basketball and football coaches are 
pouring thousands of dollars into recruits. Re- 
cruits for either sport are Invited to campus, 
lavished by money, and wooed by coaches. 
Those who decide to come receive thousands 
of dollars in scholarships. Although College 
policy prohibits the award of athletic scholar 
ships outside of basketball, it is no secret that 
the Wildcat Club donates money for football 
grants ($92,188 to be exact). Basketball gives 
out almost $86,000 a year, and with the new 
tuition hikes, that figure will also rise. The 
only fee a basketball player pays is the laun 
dry fee, and generally, alumni pay for that 



also. 

I have no quarrel whatsoever with the 
amount of money athletics receive, but it 
seems odd to me that with all those thou 
sands of dollars being poured into two sports, 
the budget allows next to nothing for the 
small sports. Just a few partial scholarships 
in just a few minor sports could make a world 
of difference. Scholarships could create bet 
ter sports programs, more pride in those pro 
grams, and, above all, less discontent in the 
Athletic Department. 

The field hockey team finished 12th in the 
AIAW National Tournament this year, with 
out the aid of scholarships or ample recruiting 
money. After the team qualified, one of the 
local television announcers said, "This is the 
first time Davidson's been in the Nationals in 
anything in ten years." He was proud. So was 
Davidson. So was Charlotte. And what could 
the team have done with athletic grants? On 
the other hand, how much more pride could 
be cultivated in the women's basketball team, 
which won only three games this year, if addi 
tionai talent were brought in via scholarships? 




FOaLS MEAN A MOMENT OF REST lor Senioi basket 
ball player Kirby Owen The young women's varsity 
teams have suffered many hardships in establishing 



elves and finding financial support tor the pr. 



Pride in our educational program is an inte- 
gral part of Davidson, and that pride will nev- 
er be removed. But pride in athletic program 
should be equally integral and an added di- 
mension to anyone who has pride in Davidson 
College. 

As it stands now, athletes of the so-called 
minor sports can have little pride because 
they are discriminated against. I am not de- 
manding that each sport be equal to the oth- 
er, for that would be financially absurd. Bas- 
ketball and football, for the time being, will 

MORE FOLLOWED THAN OTHER "MINOR" SPORTS. 

the varsity soccer team had a good following in the 
Davidson College student body 



100 STUDENT LIFE 




bring in more revenues. But the small sports 
deserve more of a commitment from the Ath 
letic Administration. 

The only apparent solution is that the Col 
lege discard its policy of giving College schol 
arships only for basketball. To the minor 
sport participant, that only manifests a half 
commitment by the College to his sport, and 
to him. Right now. Davidson is almost solely 
committed (67%. to be exact) to two sports. 
That, plain and simply, is unjust. 

Steve Soud 

WILIX:AT 10 Wrestler Scott Smith pins his opponent as 
the referee counts the pin The hardworking wrestlinq 
team attracts little support 





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NOTHING NEW: John Haskell just hitting another of his 
record sixteen doubles with congratulations from Coach 
Slagle. 




WHAT WILL IT BE? A cur^^- Kill V shi,-, ^ 
Only Jonathon Young knows for sure- 

ANOTHER BASEBALL GAME?! Preppedout Mitzi Short 
doesn t seem amused by John Porter, by his wife Sheila, 
or by Bobby Barnes. 



102 STUDENT LIFE 



Individuals Top Records 
Despite Team Weaknesses 



The Wildcat baseball team finished its 44 
game race with a strong sprint on the home 
stretch by winning four of its last five games 
and leaving several school records by the 
wayside 

Junior third baseman Allen Griffin led the 
record breaking attack as his 4 for 5 batting 
performance against Wingate gave him sev 
enty hits and pushed his average to .417. 

Griffins seventy hits is an all time high at 
Davidson, and he is only the second Wildcat 
player to ever reach the 400 plateau. George 
Weicker. who batted .448 in 1975, is the only 
other player in school history to accomplish 
this feat. Although Griffin batted .400 twice in 
high school, he entered the season looking for 
a .350 mark But, "with a little luck and a lot 
of help from John Porter." Griffin far exeeded 
his expectations. 

Just how did senior Academic All Ameri 
can Porter help? The fleet center fielder gave 
coach Charlie Slagle the option of the hit and 



run, and when Porter broke for second, holes 
opened up for Griffin. 

Senior John Haskell, who lashed out a 
school record, of sixteen doubles, will be de 
nied a repeat performance by graduation. 

The 1981 Davidson baseball team finished 
1 8-25, an improvement over 1 980 ( 1 5 24), but 
the .312 season batting mark really stood out. 
Slagle pointed out clutch hitting and fielding 
as rough spots to smooth over for next year 
"Where we could have used a strike out or a 
pop fly, we gave up a hit. Fielding-wise it was 
the same thing," Slagle said. 

Slagle specifically pointed to the April 4 
doubleheader loss to (JTC as the season's 
turning point. Davidson was 2-2 in the running 
for the Conference crown. Apparently, how 
ever, the team was looking ahead to the East 
Tennessee State game and lost the double- 
header. The Moccasins finished seventh in 
the Conference standings, one place behind 
the Wildcats 




BASEBALL TEAM: (First row) Scott Redding. Doug Wi 
ley. Jeff Ray. John Porter. Joby Merten. Allen Griffin. 
Rusty Colechia Bobby Barnes, Jonatfion Voung (Second 



row) Mark Adams, Coach Charlie Slagle. Cam Zurbruegg, 
Jeff McSwain. John Haskell. Philip Gordon. Mick Smith. 




Looking back, pitching stood out as the 
teams chief weakness. Senior Jonathon 
Young hosted the best record, with a 5 3 per 
formance, junior Rusty Colechia (5 7) and 
freshman Scott Redding (4 4) were the most 
consistent hurlers, though. 

Next year's team will again have a hard 

time on its Division I schedule, especially with 

the loss of Haskell, Merten, Porter, Jeff Ray, 

and Captain Cam Zurbruegg to graduation 

Steve Soud 





BAbLBALL 






Won 


18 Lost 25 




Davidson 


1 


Armslrong Stale 


3 


Davidson 


7 


Central Florida 


9 


Davidson 





Rollins 


12 


Davidson 


10 


Rollins 


11 


Davidson 


5 


Florida 


21 


Davidson 


5 


Guilford 


II 


Davidson 


18 


Armstrong State 


II 


Davidson 


14 


Slippery Rock 


12 


Odvidson 


5 


VPI 


13 


Davidson 


5 


VPI 


2 


Davidson 


2 


VCCJ 


7 


Davidson 


12 


West Virginia State 


II 


Davidson 


A 


West Virginia Stale 


10 


Davidson 





Winthrop 


II 


Davidson 


1 1 


VMI 


2 


Davidson 


13 


VMI 


2 


(Mvhlson 





Marshall 


3 


tJjw.Kon 


1 


Marshall 


9 


Davidson 


7 


West Virginia State 


10 


Davidson 


15 


UNCC 


I 


Davidson 





Western Carolina 


1 


Davidson 


6 


Western Carolina 


9 


Davidson 


14 


Methodist 


5 


Davidson 


8 


Pfeiffer 


7 


Davidson 


2 


UT Cattanooga 


6 


Davidson 


3 


(JT Chattanooga 


5 


Davidson 


7 


East Tennessee 


8 


Davidson 


4 


East Tennessee 


8 


Davidson 


5 


N C Stale 


17 


Davidson 


4 


Citadel 


3 


Davidson 


3 


Citadel 


4 


Davidson 


4 


Wingate 


12 


Davidson 


12 


Duke 


14 


Davidson 


5 


Furman 


4 


Davidson 


10 


Furman 


4 


Davidson 


14 


Pfeiffer 


6 


Davidson 


3 


Winthrop 


13 


Davidson 


2 


Campbell 


9 


Davison 


9 


Methodist 


4 


Davidson 


10 


Appalachian 


5 


Davidson 


3 


Appalachian 





Davidson 


8 


urscc 


4 


Davidson 


7 


North Carolina 


9 


Davidson 


8 


Wingale 


7 



WITH THE VERDICT in the glove of the Pfeiffer second 
baseman, Joby Merten hopelessly slides with the umpire 
right on his tail. 



Sports 103 



PIVOTING BEFORE A PASS. John Gullickson exhibits 
the form that led to his selection on the All-Southern 
Conference freshman team. 



SOON TO BE DISMISSED, Coach Eddie Biedenbach 
talks with some of his players. Though the team ended 
the season with its best record in seven years, behindthe- 
scene problems led to the termination of Biedenbach's 
contract After John Kresse's week-long reign, Bobby 
Hussey became Davidson's tenth head coach in twelve 
years. 




HOLDING BACK OPPONENTS proves to be a task for 
Todd Haynes, who led the team to its 104 point win over 
Marshall Haynes was honored by his selection to the All- 
Southern Conference first team and the NCAA District 3 
All Academic team. 



104 STUDENT LIFE 



Coaching Turnover Overshadows Season 




THE ADVANTAGE OF BEING 610' is displayed by 
tossup man Cliff Tribus in a 79-63 win over VAAI 

BASKETBALL TEAM: (First Row) Tommy McCon 
nell. John Carroll. Tom Franz. Todd Haynes. John 
Corso. Kenny Wilson. John Gullickson. (Second Row) 
Coach Eddie Biedenbach. Richard Wilson. Brian Row 
an, Jamie Hall. Cliff Tribus. Rich DiBenedetto, Assis 
tant Coach Carl Clayton. Assistant Coach Marv 
Kessler 



The 198081 version of Wildcat Basketball 
was enigmatic at best. Davidson posted a 13 
14 record and tied for first place in the South 
ern Conference regular season, the school's 
highest win total and best conference finish 
since 1973 74. At season's end however. 
Coach Eddie Biedenbach's contract was not 
renewed due to personal and administrative 
difficulties. Biedenbach's dismissal oversha- 
dowed the team's very competitive record. 

The Cats found the going difficult against 
out of conference foes such as Motre Dame. 
Texas A & M. Pennsylvania and two ACC 
schools, but Davidson did pick up an impres 
sive 67-63 win over Wisconsin of the Big 10. 
The trend shifted in Southern Conference 
play after Senior Todd Haynes began to assert 
himself. Haynes paced upset wins over Mar- 
shall, (JT-Chattanooga and Western Carolina 
with 25, 23, and 22 points respectively, and 





BASKETBALL 






Won 


13 Lost 14 




Davidson 


92 


Wofford 


60 


Davidson 


72 


INC. State 


89 


Davidson 


79 


E Tenn. 


97 


Davidson 


79 


Marshall (2 OT) 


73 


Davidson 


67 


Wisconsin 


63 


Davidson 


62 


Texas A & M 


76 


Davidson 


93 


GT Chattanooga 


84 


Davidson 


60 


Pennsylvania 


92 


Davidson 


79 


Holy Cross 


96 


Davidson 


70 


Wake Forest 


83 


Davidson 


67 


Notre Dame 


87 


Davidson 


77 


W Carolina 


68 


Davidson 


104 


Marshall 


76 


Davidson 


66 


Appalachian (OT) 


63 


Davidson 


73 


Furman 


72 


Davidson 


78 


W Carolina 


82 


Davidson 


79 


VMI 


63 


Davidson 


88 


South Carolina 


103 


Davidson 


68 


Citadel 


72 


Davidson 


84 


E. Tenn. (OT) 


82 


Davidson 


85 


(JT Chattanooga 


99 


Davidson 


95 


VMI 


82 


Davidson 


94 


Furman (OT) 


79 


Davidson 


63 


Citadel 


61 


Davidson 


77 


Appalachian 


78 


Davidson 


89 


UNCC (2 OT) 


91 


Davidson 


77 


Marshall 


90 




the seasonal pattern was established. The 
Wildcats would be a team to be reckoned with 
in the Southern Conference. 

Halfway through the conference schedule, 
the Wildcats stood 6 1 and AII-SC forward 
Rich DiBenedetto was beginning to pick tip 
where he left off a year ago. DiBenedetto led a 
73-72 victory over Furman with 20 points and 
15 rebounds and the offensive patterns 
seemed to be shifting inside toward the 6'7" 
220 p>ound forward. Earlier in the year the 
offensive flow wasn't taking advantage of Di- 
Benedetto's bullish moves inside, but as the 
season wound down Richie received the ball 
more often in scoring position and along with 
Haynes formed the most productive scoring 
combination in the Conference. 

Down the stretch Davidson seemed to play 
according to the caliber of the opposition. A 
loss to the lowly Citadel and a scant victory 
over the same team as compared to victories 
over East Tennessee State and Furman illus- 
trate this tendency. Nevertheless, the Wild- 
cats had the opportunity to win the Southern 
Conference outright in the Conference finale 
at Appalachian State, but were snakebitten 
on a last second Mountaineer jumper. Head- 
ing into the tournament Davidson seemed to 
be in excellent shape. Freshman John Gullick- 
son was contributing consistently on the of- 
fensive end, newcomers Kenny Wilson and 
Tommy McConnell were settling down, and 
Haynes and DiBenedetto seemed to be on top 
of their games. Visiting Marshall subsequent- 
ly ended the Cat's season on a premature note 
with a 90-77 triumph, the day after which 
Biedenbach was dismissed from his contract. 

Individual honors included Haynes' selec- 
tion to the All-Southern Conference first team 
and the MCAA District 3 All-Academic team, 
DiBenedetto's second team All-Conference 
status, and Gullickson's All-Southern Confer- 
ence freshman team selection. For the year 
Haynes averaged nearly 20 points per game 
and shot 54% from the field. DiBenedetto 
averaged 14 points and led the team in re- 
bounding while Gullickson posted an 11.6 
average. Center Jamie Hall and point guard 
John Carroll also made solid contributions. 

Two weeks after Biedenbach's somewhat 
controversial dismissal, John Kresse of the 
College of Charleston signed a five year con- 
tract as his replacement. The Davidson com- 
munity was shaken again one week later as 
Kresse handed over a very short Davidson 
coaching career to Bobby Hussey of Belmont 
Abby College; Hussey makes the tenth head 
basketball coach at Davidson in just over 
twelve years. 

Van Beck 



Sports 105 




POISED AND READY FOR ACTION: Mitzl Short pre 
pares to sink a one pointer. 



WOMEN'S BASKETBALL: (First Row) Harriet Holshuij tant Coach Lisa Boyer. Amy Crittenberger. Laura Hills, 
sen. Mike Frankhouser. Kirby Owen. Cathy Morell. Debbie Hayes. Carol Heppner, Nancy Bondurant. Mitzi 
Jeanne Womack, Barbara Hoopes. (Second Row) Assis Short. Coach Dee Mayes. 



106 STUDENT LIFE 



DETERMINED TO OUTSTRETCH HER OPPONENI. 
Forwdtd Cifol Ht-ppnet i.-ji h.-s lor ,i luiiip t'.ill 



Inexperience Causes Losses 




Our young, inexperienced women's basket 
ball team never really got on the right track 
this year, mainly because of the experience 
factor, and finished with a dismal 3 18 record. 

First year coach Dee Mayers started four 
sophomores, attesting to the team's youth, 
and Senior Guard Kirby Owen rounded out 
the lineup Owen and the other member of the 
backcourt tandem, Mitzi Short, were often 
erratic from their positions. Sophomore For- 
ward Jeanne Womack came on at the end of 
the season; and her partner beneath the bas 
ket, Carol Heppner, played well despite being 
undersized for the position. At the post posi- 
tion, of course, was Mike Frankhouser, who 
avoided the sophomore jinx to equal her stel- 
lar freshman season. Frankhouser was the 
team highscorer in almost every game, and 
was given the postseason honor of the All- 
Conference First Team. 

Backing the starters was a not-sodeep 
bench that included 3 players who had never 
played organized basketball. The only Junior 
on the team was Barbara Hoopes, who had 
never played organized ball. Sophomore 
Cathy Morrell filled in very well at forward, 
and Amy Crittenburger, who had never really 

DISPLAYING THE TEAM SPIRIT OF THE LADY CATS. 

Mike Frankhouser and Mitzi Short congratulate each oth 
er on a good play. 




played before, improved drastically across 21 
games. Freshmen Nancy Bonduront and Deb- 
bie Hayes were a heady duo at guard; and 
Laura Hills, who completes the roster of rook- 
ie players, also improved. By the end of the 
season, transfer student Harriet Holshuijsen 
subbed in very well for Frankhouser. 

Perhaps the team's greatest accomplish 
ment was sticking together, playing team 
ball, and hustling through a long season, that 
yielded only three wins. After an embarrass- 
ing blow-out at the hands of Belmont Abbey, 
the lady Cats came back to beat the Crusad 
ers 69-60 in Johnston Gym. The team came 
back again to win a second match up, as they 
beat Meredith 50-47 in a tightly contested 
game. The team's best effort was saved for 
Methodist. With just a few seconds left on the 
clock, and the Cats down 55-56, the team 
inbounded the ball. A series of quick passes 
left the ball with Heppner, and she layed it up 
for the game-winning shot at the buzzer. 

Then the girls wound up on the other end of 
the gun again. CINC Greensboro put a shot in 
at the buzzer at the Coloseum to beat David- 
son 55-54. Methodist took the Cats in over- 
time, to win 83-77. 

Although this season was nothing to shout 
about, prospects for 1981-82 are excellent. 
The addition of a 6'2 " freshman may enable 
Heppner to relocate at guard and take the 
place of Owen. There are reports of other 
talent in the class of 1985, so look forward to 
an exciting season of basketball. 





WOMEN S BASKETBALL 








Won 3 Lost 18 




Davidson 


46 


Barber-Scotia 


53 


Davidson 


37 


Meredith 


50 


Davidson 


60 


Belmont Abbey 


87 


Davidson 


37 


Notre Dame 


85 


Davidson 


54 


Davidson CC 


65 


Davidson 


54 


(JNCG 


55 


Davidson 


69 


Belmont Abbey 


60 


Davidson 


44 


Bennett 


60 


Davidson 


51 


Converse 


56 


Davidson 


77 


Methodist (OT) 


83 


Davidson 


57 


St. Andrews 


63 


Davidson 


60 


Wesleyan 


65 


Davidson 


48 


Furman 


75 


Davidson 


59 


(JNC-G 


72 


Davidson 


50 


Meredith 


47 


Davidson 


46 


Wesleyan 


96 


Davidson 


57 


Methodist 


56 


Davidson 


43 


Bennett 


55 


Davidson 


59 


St. Andrews 


70 


Davidson 


59 


Davidson CC 


71 


Davidson 


55 


St. Andrews 


64 



Sports 107 



DAVIDSON CHEERLEADERS PYRAMID THE TEAM 
TO VICTORY: (Bottom Row) Brown Dennis (Davidson 
Gentleman). Todd Thomson. Marshall Wellborn. Rob 
lies. John Storey. (Second Row) Carolyn Barnett. Amy 
Robinson, Lisa Hasty. Lisa Olson (Top Row) Renee Hed- 
gepeth. Patti Long, Patty Bates 




"YEA WILDCATS!" shouts Frank Clark, as he gives a 
final yell of victory following a season home game. 

ATOP A FIVE-LAYER PYRAMID. Patti Long exhibits 
balancing skills developed through hours of hard prac- 
tice. 




108 STUDENT LIFE 



In Pursuit 

Of 
Pyramids 



For the Davidson cheerleaders, the season 
had begun long before Wildcat football hit 
Johnston stadium. Attending (JGA Cheerlead 
ing Camp for a week during the month of 
August, the squad won a couple of ribbons as 
well as spirit awards in the inter squad compe- 
tition. School began a week in advance for the 
group with practice and preparations con 
suming the bulk of their time. The First Annu 
al Cheerleader Barbecue, catered by Big Dad 
dies and featuring a blue grass band, was held 
the afternoon of the first home game. Periodic 
pep rallies and spirit raisers at the Peregrine 
House complete with the spirit juice itself as 
well as parties honoring the athletes and pep 
band were sponsored by the squad to round 
out an already busy but exciting season. Cap 
tained by Lisa Olson and co-captained by Lisa 
Hasty, the squad of sixteen members led the 
Wildcat fans in spirit and sportsmanship. 

Lisa Olson 





POMPONS PROUDLY DISPLAYED. Carolyn Barnett 
confidently anticipates another Davidson basket 



A YOUNG DAVIDSON FAN joins Wildcat Dave Dus 
seault in cheering The mascot was an added source of 
pep for the cheerleading squad 



Sports 109 



Conditioning Prepares Runners For Trails 



To the runners it's called "sport, " but to 
others it's just plain masochism. What else 
would you call running eight to ten miles a 
day (fifteen to twenty on "long days ') in addi 
tion to the daily two hour team work outs just 
to get into shape to run farther and faster?!? 
Perhaps you and I would call it crazy, but to 
the twenty-eight men and ten women who 
make up Davidson's two Cross Country 
teams, it's all in a day's work. Some would 
even go as far as to say it's fun! 

Sterling Martin, coach for both teams, says 
that although practice officially starts the 
first day of Fall term, Cross Country "requires 
a good background of running all summer." 
Intensive training continues well into Novem- 
ber and many Cross Country runners run 
Track to keep in shape year-around. Martin 
was pleased with the dedication and perfor- 
mance of both teams during practices and 
meets this season, calling the men's team 
"one of the best team efforts" he's seen in the 
fifteen years he's been involved in running. 
Martin says the women's team "will take a 
while to gel in terms of strength," but he is 
looking forward to building this relatively 
young team. He is expecting the women's 
team to be very competitive once they have a 
little more experience behind them. 

Davidson's men's team was led by Senior 
John Davis and Junior-transfer Randy 
McManus. As Coach Martin put it, "They 
traded wins throughout the season-each com- 
ing in first in four races." Davis, who was 



back after a season off, was voted the team's 
Most Valuable Runner, and McManus, who 
tied Davis with ninety one votes, received the 
Fred Borch Award "in recognition of out- 
standing contributions to team effort." Davis 
and McManus received strong support from 
Senior Jeff Morrow, who consistently main 
tained third place on the team and who fin 
ished second in the Southern Conference 
Championships. 

The men's traveling squad, or "A " Team as 
they were unofficially dubbed by fellow team- 
mates, was rounded off by John Rees ('82), 
Danny Armistead ('82), Captain Bart Landess 
('81), Terry Morrow ('81), Jack Smith ('83) 
and Frank Ivey ('84). They were backed up by 
sophomore Dave Stosur and freshman Dave 
Barnes. All in all. Coach Martin characterized 
most as having "their best season ever ". 

The men's "best team effort all season" 
came during the Southern Conference Cham 
pionships in Greenville, S.C. The team antici 
pated eighth place but rallied to capture sixth 
in what Martin called "the high point of the 
season."" McManus finished first, Davis took 
third with Rees and Landess close behind in 
fourth and fifth, respectively This good show 
ing was especially rewarding since most 
Southern Conference teams can entice superi- 
or runners to their schools with running schol 
arships which Davidson does not give. 

Davidson"s women"s team was led by fresh 
man standout, Tamara Foreman, who fin- 
ished the season with forty points. Following 



close behind with thirty-seven points was a 
greatly improved sophomore, Marian Hill. 
These two were supported by team stalwarts, 
sophomore captain Merris Hollingsworth, and 
juniors Carie Nunn and Melissa Peacock. 
These runner, along with Jane Thompson 
("84) and Nancy Wright ("81) received varsity 
letters. Sophomore hopeful INatalie Kerr was 
injured and unfortunately unable to compete 
after the second meet. 

The Women"s first win came against the 
Duke Women"s Club Team; however, their 
best meet of the year was probably at Appala- 
chian State. Davidson won 19-40 on what 
Coach Martin called a "killer course" because 
of the mountainous terrain and bitter cold air. 
Marian Hill shone in this race, placing second 
overall. The women placed fourth at the State 
Meet in Raleigh behind North Carolina State 
("'probably one of the three best teams in the 
country '") and others from non-division two 
teams. Coach Martin says the team is ""hav- 
ing trouble finding teams to compete with on 
an equal basis " because women's Cross 
Country is a fairly new sport in our area. 

One of the highlights for both teams this 
season was the third annual European Cross 
Country Meet co-sponsored by Davidson, the 
Charlotte Track Club, and Phidippides Run 
ning Center. This open meet consisted of 



FLEXIBILITY IS ESSENTIAL for successful longdis 
tance running as senior Terry Morrow demonstrates. 
Somehow, he makes it look so ea.'^v 




three 10,000 meter (6.2 miles) races over d 
modified cross country course. Obstacles in 
eluded three creeks (no fair usinc) ttu- 
bridges!!) and seventeen steeple chase hur 
dies or fences. This years participants had an 
added obstaclea truck unexpectedly parked 
on the trail by a very surprised driver who had 
stopped to collect pine needles. Instead of 
pine needles, he got dozens of muddy run 
ners! After all. in European style Cross Coun 
try. "the muddier the better!" Using that 
motto as a standard, it was a very good race 
for many Davidson runners. 

Cross Country running is hard work and 
practice is intense, but both teams had their 
lighter moments. In fact, a characteristic, 
which seems almost a team prerequisite, is a 
sense of humor Leader of the Cross Country 
Comedians seems to be sophomore Dave Sto 
sur. Famous for his "Felix the Cat" imitations 
and doing the Irish gig between (and during) 
100 m strides. Dave could always be counted 
on to lead the team in song along the trail. 
Garry Sullivan emerged as the "Z team" ring 
leader, but rumor has it that he was the only 
member of this illustrious group. The Wom 
en's team had their inside jokes as well. Just 
ask them about "getting full." And most im 
portant, they want you to know that they are 
"nice" girls. We're sure many Davidson guys 
will be delighted to hear that. Only one prob 
lem guys, you'll have to run awfully fast to 
catch them! 

-Trjtv Thompson 





Ml M S CRUiS CUUN 1 RV 






Won 9 Lost 5 




Davidson 


15 


(JTChallanooga 


50 


Davidson 


21 


Georgia Slate 


35 


ll.ivutson 


49 


Duke 


15 


DdvictMin 


61 


Camphcll 


41 


Davidson 


bl 


Geofijld State 


;5 


Davidson 


61 


UAB 


86 


Davidson 


61 


Lynchburq 


115 


Davidson 


61 


UNCC 


125 


Davidson 


72 


Appalachian 


21 


Davidson 


72 


Furman 


47 


Davidson 


18 


UNCC 


45 


Davidson 


lb 


ONC Wilminqton 


49 


Davidson 


27 


Campbell 


28 


Davidson 


31 


Citadel 


24 


lOth in State Cross Country Championstiips 




6th in Southern Conference Championships 




WOMEN'S CROSS COUNTRY 






Won 


3 Lost 5 




Davidson 


50 


Georgia State 


15 


Davidson 


34 


Berry 


23 


5lh in Stone Mountain 


Road Race 




Davidson 


23 


Duke 


36 


Davidson 


94 


Georgia State 


26 


Davidson 


94 


UA Birmingham 


46 


Davidson 


94 


Wake Forest 


62 


Davidson 


19 


Appalachian 


40 


Davidson 


20 


ONC Wilmington 


35 


4th in NCAIAW State 


Meet 





FRESHMAN STAINDOOT. Tamara Foreman, stretches 
one last lime while she and teammates Hope McArn. 
Natalie Kerr. Merns Hollingsworlh. and Marian Hill v»arm 
up twiore a dual meet against Duke 





CROSS COUNTRY TEAMS: (Front Row) Danny Armis 
tead. Randy McManus. Howard Browne. David Stosur. 
David Barnes. Jeff Morrow. Frank Ivey (Second Row) 
Robert Frierson. Melissa Peacock. Jane Thompson. Ta 
mara Foreman. John Davis. Bart Landess. John Rees 



(Third Row) Rick Gergoudis, Terry Morrow. Jack Smith. 
Marian Hill. Merns Hollingsworth. Carie Nunn. Jeff Hamil 
ton (Fourth Row) Brad Perkins. Robert Teer. Joe Sloop. 
David Teer. Tim Ritchie. Coach Sterling Martin. 



SECOND PLACE FINISHER in the Southern Conference 
Champions. Jeff Morros attempts a water jump on the 
Davidson course. 



Sports 1 1 1 



A Record-Breaking Year — 14 Straight Wins 



FOLLOWING A CORNER HIT BY THE OPPOSING 
TEAM. Lisa Bailantyne and Sally Craig line upon the 
circle for a corner hit 



Field Hockey Hits Goals 



'Field Hockey is a mysterious game to a lot 
of people.' That's the feeling recalled by 
Cathy Inabnet as she reflects upon her numer 
ous games and remembers the confused, yet 
enthusiastic supporters cheering her on from 
the hill above the field. Field hockey became 
a Davidson varsity sport in 1976. Thus vi^ith 
five seasons to their name, the field hockey 
team under the guidance of former coach 
Susi Roberts and present coach Dee Mayes 
has emerged one of Davidson's most success 
ful sports teams. 

With an overall record of 46-20-6, the team 
started out this season slowly with 0-3. But 
concentration was the name of the game as 
they dedicated themselves to improving skills 
and teamwork. Confidence rose among the 
team members as they saw their own im- 
provement with each game. This confidence 
was mirrored in the team's fans as they saw 
the game scores reflect the team's improve- 
ment. The line of victories numbered 14, their 
longest winning streak ever. 

Other new team records included the most 
goals scored in a single game (10 versus East 
Carolina on Oct. 1 1), the most goals scored in 
one season (49, including national competi- 
tion), and the largest winning margin (10-0 
against East Carolina). 

The team's peak came on the muddy 
swamplands of Duke University at the State 
Tournament. The first victory over High Point 
was secured by a famous Amy Crittenberger 
flick for a 1-0 score. This qualified them for 
the finals against archrival Pfeiffer College. 
Perfect mental and physical preparation en- 
abled the Cats to claim the State AIAW Title 
Championship with a 2-1 edge. 

But things didn't stop here as the Cats trav- 
elled up to High Point for a five-state Regional 
Tournament, where they qualified for the Na- 
tional Tournament to be held in Edwardsville, 
Illinois. And so on Nov. 18, when the hockey 
team was off to Illinois. They flew into St. 
Louis, city of the arch and famous Italian food 
... so they had heard . . . and so they found 
out. 

They beat Lehigh 1-0 in the first round with 
a goal by Mavin Martin. The next bout ended 
in a loss, 5-0 against Southwestern Missouri, 
who survived to the semi-final level of the 
tournament. Commented Coach Mayes, 
"Southwestern Missouri . . . had exceptional 
forwards, but the field play was relatively 
equal. " The last match in the double elimina- 
tion was against Northwestern. With a half- 
time score of 2-0, in favor of Northwestern, 
the Cats made a comeback as Carol Heppner 
scored on one end while the defense kept a 



112 STUDENT LIFE 



tight guard on the other. But time ran out, and 
Davidson suffered a 2-1 loss to Northwestern. 
But they had made it to the second round of 
the competition and so returned to Davidson 
with a national ranking of between seventh 
and twelfth. Only the final six teams in the 
competition received a specific numerical 
rank. 

With the end of the 1980 season, several 
seniors will be leaving the team. Barb Ashley 
Lisa Bailantyne, Sally Craig and captain 
Cathy Inabnet, all 4yr. veterans, have been 
tremendous assets in ability and leadership 
Cathy Inabnet has broken several Davidson 
individual records this season. Among these 
are the most goals in one game (5 against 
East Carolina), and the most goals in one 
season (18). She also set a career scoring 
record with 37 during the period of 1977 
1980. 







— Lisa 


Sloan 




FIELD HOCKEY 




w 


on 15 


Lost 7 Tied 1 




Davidson 


1 


Pfeiffer 


4 


Davidson 





Appalachian 


1 


Davidson 


1 


Madison 


4 


Davidson 


7 


Wake Forest 


1 


Davidson 


3 


Charlotte Flickers 


1 


Davidson 


2 


N.C Club 


1 


Davidson 


2 


Duke 





Davidson 





ECU 





Davidson 


2 


High Point 


1 


Davidson 


2 


Catav^ba 


1 


Davidson 


3 


Converse 


1 


Davidson 


6 


Winthrop 


1 


NCAIAW State 


Tour 


nament 




Davidson 


1 


High Point 





Davidson 


2 


Pfeiffer 


1 


Deep South Tc 


urnament (2nd Place) 




Davidson 





Duke 


n 


Davidson 


I 


SC Club 


n 


Davidson 


2 


Catawba 





Davidson 


1 


Clemson 


2 


Region 1 1 Tou 


rnament (2nd Place) 




Davidson 


1 


High Point 





Davidson 





Pfeiffer 


2 


AIAW Nationa 


Tour 


nament 




Davidson 


1 


Lehigh 





Davidson 





Southwestern. Mo 


5 


Davidson 


1 


Northwestern 


2 




DURING THE CAFAWBA GAME, sophomore half- 
back Beth Davidson leans toward the ball for an up- 
field pass to teammate Cathy Inabnet on the way to a 
2 1 win 



SENIOR RIGHT WING Cathy Inabnel reaches forward to FIELD HOCKEY TEAM: (Front row) Cathy Inabnet, Beth berger, Carolme Scragg. Leslie Bryan (Back row) Carol 
drive the ball toward the goal Cathy set a career scoring Davidson, Mitji Short. Mebane Atwood. Mavin Martin Heppner. Lisa Ballantyne. Barb Ashley. Cathy Morell 
record of 37 points durinii thr 197 7 19H0 seasons (Second row) Kdtjc Oagi-nhart, Laura Hills, Amy Crilten Sally Craig. Courtney Hall. Coach Dee Mayes 




JAGS PACKED AND SPIRITS HIGH, the team began its 
inal trip from Douglas Airport Its destination: Edwards- 
ille. Illinois for the National Tournament, the first such 
ournament for any Davidson team. Though the team 
asted for only three games, the experience was the first 
if its kind for the girls. 



Sports 113 




7i^"''i 




W'-'^/i 




UMFORTUrSATELY. CRaTCHES WERE MORE THE ^°°Ifj^'-J- '"■'"'"^t OCCGRRED NOT ONLY CM 
RULE than the exception for quite a few of tf.e Wildcat ™i^',^':^„'',".'„!!,"l^r^!^ ', !Ll' ^^l „ .,!l!T^ 
team members- 



Norton's handiwork. Mohawk victims Danny Klinar and 
Bryan Lowe wear bandanas. 




Inconsistencies, 

Injuries, Dampen 

Prospects For 

Wins 

Although the Davidson football season 
might have been called "Great Expectations" 
before it started, by the time it was over it 
could have been coined "The Davidson .500." 
Injuries and inconsistency plagued the team 
as it finished 5-5. 

Coach Ed Farrell, looking at the schedule 
during the preseason, didn't "think there was 
anyone on the schedule we couldn't beat." 
That is not to say that he expected a 10-0 
season, but he expected better. For instance, 
the Wildcats shocked Bucknell; in later 
games Bucknell whipped Boston University, 
yet BU easily handled Davidson. Although 
Farrell's and anyone else's preseason predic- 
tions did not include an undefeated season, 
there was general agreement that Davidson 
would enjoy a superlative season of 8-2 or 
thereabouts. So what happened? 

Well most people look to the injury lists. 
That roster included star senior Alvin Atkin- 
son and highly-rated senior receiver Gifford 
Piercy, a duo that was to spearhead a potent 
Davidson attack. Injuries to several offensive 
linemen didn't help matters either. Farrell, 
however, refused to make an excuse of injur- 
ies saying, "If we had played perfect football 
and lost, it could be blamed on injuries, but 
we didn't play perfect football." 

Perfect, no. But at times very good. One 
thing that disturbed Farrell was that often 
those times of very good football came after 
the first quarter. Bucknell held a 13-0 first 
quarter lead in what seemed to be a blowout, 
but the Wildcats woke up and played out- 
standing ball for 3 quarters for a big win. 
Boston on the other hand took a 21-0 first 
quarter lead, but the Cats could only play 
even-up the final 3 quarters to lose, 35-14. 

The Wildcats also picked up wins in the 
season over Springfield, a scrubbing of South- 
western, and back-to-back wins over Hamp- 
den-Sydney and Guilford. Other losses came 
at the hands of Lafayette, Lehigh, Southern 
Conference champs Furman, and perennial 
power The Citadel. Farrell felt most of the 
losses were due to offensive inconsistency 
rooted in both the injuries and the coaching 
staff. 

— Steve Soud 

SENIOR PATRICK POPE PREPARES FOR A BUCK- 
NELL LINEMAN in a turnaround game which Davidson 
won 2 1 1 3 after having fallen behind thirteen points in the 
first quarter . 




WHILE BOSTON UNIVERSITY TROUNCES THE CATS 
in first quarter play, sophomore Kevin Attar yearns to go 
home 





FOOTBALL RESULTS 






Won 5 Lost 5 




Davidson 


42 


Springfield 


14 


Davidson 


20 


Lafayette 


27 


Davidson 


56 


Southwestern 


3 


Davidson 


21 


Bucknell 


13 


Davidson 


14 


Boston U 


35 


Davidson 


14 


Lehigh 


49 


Davidson 


14 


Hampden Sydney 


7 


Davidson 


33 


Guilford 


20 


Davidson 


7 


Furman 


21 


Davidson 


13 


Citadel 


21 



1980 ROSTER William Allibone. Wade Anderson. Alvin 
-Mkinson, Kevin Attar. Atmire Bailey. Brent Baker. Jeff 
h.uibchlicher. John Bazos. Craig Binkley. Mark Black 
man. Greg Bounds. Robbie Brannen. Tim Burke. Will 
hynum. Bill Chaler. Jim Cox. Clarence Del Forge. Mickey 
Dillon. Keith Ellis. Mark Fahey. Dean Garvin. John Grav 
ley. Flint Gray. Jerry Grubba. Kevin Hanna. Mike Harbert. 
Mark Hartman. Wesley Haynes. Todd Hermetz. Rog 
er Herbert. Tom Hissam. Charles Hooks. Kenny Hovet. 
James Jones. Mike Jones. Jeff Kane. Bob Kear. Andre 
Kennebrew. Jimmy Kinsey. Dan Klinar, Stan Klinger. 
Derek Lee. Dwayne Lett, Chuck Lifford. Bryan Lowe. 



Steve Lowe. James Lynskey. Tom McKean. James 
McLain. Rusty McLelland. Jeff McSwain. Keith Martin. 
Leon Mason. Bob Miller. Dave Nichols. Tate Nichols. Joe 
Palasak. Wayne Paymer. Svend Pedersen. Gifford Piercy. 
Robert Pool. Scott Powers. Bill Price. Andy Rock. Aaron 
Rollins. Alan Rosier. Ron Schumer. Don Scott. Pat Sheri 
dan. Mitch Shirley. Gary Sims. Ray Sinclair. Lance Sis 
con. Mike Smith. Shawn Stafford. Perry Swindall. Robbie 
Thornsberry. Carl Tolbert. John Vassos. Frank Via. Leon 
ard Walker. Bruce Wallstedt. Wendell Washington. Lee 
Whitesides. Brian Whitmire. Kendnck Williams. Richie 
Willis 





Sports 1 1 5 



Swingers Drive Long For 
Practice As Well As Hole 




The Davidson Golf Team bridged a number 
of obstacles, not the least of which was a 
thirty minute drive to the nearest practice 
field to finish the season with a 31 record. 

As the team entered the Southern Confer- 
ence Championship with a respectable sea- 
son behind them, hopes were high for a strong 
conference finish. Results, however, were 
only modest. After posting their 3-1 dual 
match record, the Wildcats could only man- 
age a seventh place finish in a conference of 
nine teams, though an improvement over last 
year. 

The team's best tournament play came at 
the Elon Invitational in the early spring, where 
Captain L.D. Simmons captured the individ- 
ual win, firing rounds of 68-73 for a one under- 
par total, and led the Cats to a tenth-place 

FOLLOWING THROGGH. captain L.D. Simmons exhib 
its the form that led him to win the Elon Invitational 
tournament 



team finish in a field of 27 squads. 

Senior Mark Shogry played solid golf dur- 
ing his two-year reign as second man, while 
Brett Storm, Rick Jenkins, and Ed Imbrogno 
rounded out the starting senior corps. Next 
year's nucleus will be composed of sopho- 
more Tom Haller and junior Mott McDonald, 
with strong play hopefully coming from Dave 
Lincoln and Bob Whalen. 

-Rick Jenkins 





GOLF 




Won 


3 Lost 1 




Davidson 323 


Pfeiffer 


332 


Davidson 394 


Western Carolina 


402 


Davidson 326 


Catawba 


333 


Davidson 404 


UNCC 


393 


10th out of 15 teams 


n Elon Invitational 




13th out of 15 teams 


n Pembroke Invitational | 


13th out of 15 teams 


n VPI Tournament 




7th out of 9 teams in 


Southern Conference 




Tournament 










THE ART OF A GOLF SWING: Bent knees, weight on 
forward foot, head down, and a relaxed swing with the 
club extending straight from the arm as Rick Jenkins 
demonstrates with this pitch shot onto the green 




STUDENT LIFE 116 




OOLF TEAM: (First row) David Lir>coln, L D Simmons 
Mark Shogiy, Rotxrrl Whalpn (Second row) Coach Thom- 
as Cartmill, Richard Jenkins. Tom Haller. Will Dunbar. 
Brell Storm 




CHECKIMG THE SOLE OF HIS SHOE? No starter Rick 
Jenkins Is stretching out his body from toe to neck on his 
follow through. 

KEEP AN EYE ON THAT BALL! Without moving from 
his follow through or from his stance. Tom Haller eyes 
the path of his ball. 



Sports H7 



They Don't Just Shoot The Breeze 



Rifle Team Shoots For Accuracy 




Previous years have proven the high stan- 
dard and skill of the rifle team, and this year 
was no exception, with a record of 21-6. 

One of the brightest points of the regular 
season was an early season first place finish 
in a Western Carolina Conference Match, 
beating seven teams, among them strong Ap- 
palachian State University. In the Southern 
Conference post season tournament, David- 
son placed fourth behind nationally ranked 
East Tennessee, Appalachian, and Virginia 
Military Institute. 

The team suffered a setback with the loss 
of George Hatfield midway through the sea- 
son, but juniors George Webster and Craig 
Rice paced the team with excellent scores. 
Rice went on to become a member of the 
southern Conference All-Conference rifle 
team. 

-Pat Stuart 

"GOTCHA!" thinks Pat Stuart as he awaits the arrival of 
freshmen coeds who journey to Basement Belk for a 
midnight snack. 








RIFLE 






Won 


18 Lost 7 




Davidson 


1244 


Wake Forest 


1131 


Davidson 


1024 


Western Carolina 


868 


Davidson 


1024 


Citadel 


1031 


Davidson 


1281 


Appalachian 


1262 


Davidson 


1281 


Wake Forest 


1258 


Davidson 


1281 


Wofford 


1257 


Davidson 


1281 


Clemson 


1194 


Davidson 


1281 


Presbyterian 


1158 


Davidson 


1281 


S.C. State 


1115 


Davidson 


1281 


Western Carolina 


910 


Davidson 


2061 


VMl 


2100 


Davidson 


2061 


Wofford 


2017 


Davidson 


2061 


Citadel 


1955 


Davidson 


1998 


Marshall 


1951 


Davidson 


1998 


East Tennessee 


2274 


Davidson 


1998 


(JT Chattanooga 


2042 


Davidson 


2572 


N.C. State 


2757 


Oavidson 


1255 


Appalachian 


1281 


Davidson 


1255 


Wofford 


1279 


Davidson 


1255 


Wake Forest 


1242 


Davidson 


1255 


Clemson 


1242 


Davidson 


1255 


Furman 


1238 


Davidson 


1255 


Presbyterian 


1167 




RIFLE TEAM: (First Row) Pat Stuart, Craig Rice. Steve 
Lawrence. (Back Row) S/Sgt. Ransom Cooper, Jim 



Mashburn, Elizabeth Brazell. George Webster. Doug Aus 



THE BASEMENT OF BELK DORM provides a suitable 
rifle range for team members such as Jim Mashburn, 
who lines up his target, his ears protected by mufflers. 

WITH AN EYE TO KILL, sophomore Elizabeth Brazell 
sights her target during a rifle practice. 



118 STUDENT LIFE 



*. 



> 



'A 






.-v 



.c 



^ / 



Jll 






\, 





SAILS LOWERED, crew Jerry Cook eases the boat 
ashore, while skipper Jeff Jordan raises the rudder Jerry 
and Jeff were two of the many freshmen and sophomores 
on the team this year 

TILLER IN HAND, team captain Stuart Baskin steers the 
team through a much improved season; they came in 
third out of seven in their division of the SAISA 



Points Regatta at the University of Vir 


5th Place 


ginia 




Points Regatta at Davidson 


2nd Place 


Points Regatta at Duke University 


4th Place 


SAISA Team Race Championships at 




the College of Charleston 


5th Place 


SAISA Spring Dinghy Championships 




at Davidson College 


7th Place 


SAISA Women's Championships at the 
College of Charleston 


4th Place 




1 



\ 



120 STUDENT LIFE 



Young And Unsung Sailors Tack Ahead 




The sailing team, although often over- 
looked because of its low-key attitude, is a 
varsity sport at Davidson. For the second con 
secutive year Stuart Baskin was the captain 
of the team which is almost entirely student 
run and organized. Invaluable guidance and 
assistance, however, is rendered by French 
professor and avid yachtsman Dr. Hallam 
Walker. 

Although Davidson qualified for the South 
Atlantic Intercollegiate Sailing Association 
championships in both the Spring and Fall 
seasons, neither season was outstanding. The 
Cats finished third of seven in the Morthern 
division of the South Atlantic Intercollegiate 
Sailing Association both seasons. The high 
points of the year included second place fin- 
ishes in both Davidson points regattas. In ad- 
dition, Davidson consistently bested intense 
rivals University of Morth Carolina and [North 
Carolina State. 

With the exception of Baskin and two other 
seniors, Ron Davis and Margaret Karis, this 
year's team was very young. Almost all of the 
twenty member team were freshmen and 
sophomores. Valuable experience was gained 
by many of them which will prove helpful in 
the coming years. 

-Eric Banner 



ON OUR OWN LAKE NORMAN. Kathleen Huff and Norman Yacfit Club Dingfiy Cfiampionships, in which 
Stuart Baskin prepare to come about during the Lake they placed seventh. 




BEER IN HAND. Freshman Margot Pearce collapses i 
the dock after a strenuous practice. 



SAILING TEAM: (First row) Will Berson, John Stanback. 
Eric Sanner (Second row) John Stipp. Tracy Thompson. 
Margaret Karis. Bill Bankhead, Miranda Mowbray. Kath 



leen Huff. Stuart Baskin. (Third row) Ron Davis. Gary 
Walton. Jerry Cook, Peggy Blount. Becky Waters. 



Sports 121 




IF AGGRESSION HAD DETERMINED THE OaTCOME 
OF THE SEASON, Davidson would have been undefeat 
ed according to freshman upstart Chris Roberts' expres 
sion. 

SOCCER TEAM: (First Row) Peter Burr. Todd Beck, Tom 
Schember. Chris Roberts, Chuck Price, Mike Lockwood. 
Jerry Cook. (Second Row) Todd Kimsey, Richard Terry. 
Stephen Giles, Paul Ray. Will Abberger. John Van Dell. 
Alex McCallie. (Third Row) Charles Coffey. Chris Moore. 
Brooks Babcock. Hall Barnett, Bill Wahl, Leif Johnston. 
Dan Blood. (Fourth Row) Coach Charlie Slagle. Mark 
Elmore, Todd Lambert. Jimmy Hawk, Pat Woodward. 
Mike lordanou. Dan Robinson, Bill Satterwhite. 



122 STUDENT LIFE 




Improvement With A Kick 



The season opened promisingly with the 
team winning their first five games and shut 
ting out several of their opponents. A lull 
came in the middle of the season with the 
Cats dropping losses to the Citadel, Washing- 
ton and Lee. and Winthrop. The Cats also lost 
a hotly contested game to regional archrival 
(JNCC 3-2 and to top-ten ranked Appalachian 
State. With the record standing at 88. David 
son faced Eastern Tennessee and managed to 
pull out a winning season. A big win came 
against Southern Conference rival Western 
Carolina on their astroturf. a surface which 
inhibited Davidson play last year. 

The soccer team showed continued im 
provement by accomplishing a 9-8 season re- 
cord under new coach. Davidson graduate. 
Charlie Slagle. it was the Wildcats' first win 
ning season since 1974. They were 5-3 in the 
Southern Conference to achieve a fourth 
place finish, a one place improvement over 
last year. 

Standouts on the young squad included 
senior Chris Moore, juniors Danny Robinson 
and goalie Mike lordanou. and sophomores 
Bill Wahl and Todd Lambert. Freshman sen- 
sation, Chris Roberts, scored eight goals, giv 
ing promise of an even better '81 season for 



the Soccer Wildcats. 



■Katie Tully 



SOCCER IS A FAST PACED GAME where one step, as 
Chris Roberts realizes, can make a big difference when 
fighting for control of the ball 






AS ANY SOCCER ENTHUSIAST KNOWS, coordinated 
knee work, as Ben Dishman demonstrates, remains fun 
damental to out-performing your opponent. 

AS THE PLAY COMES TO A STAND-OFF. Chuck Price 
tries to master the situation by Intimidating his opponent. 







SOCCER 






Won 9 Lost 8 




Davidson 


3 


Presbyterian 





Davidson 


5 


Catawba 





Davidson 


5 


Warren Wilson 





Davidson 


2 


Marshall 





Davidson 


3 


CJNCAshevllle 





Davidson 


4 


(JT-Chattanooga 


2 


Davidson 





Citadel 


2 


Davidson 


2 


VMI 


1 


Davidson 





Washington and Lee 


2 


Davidson 


1 


Appalachian 


9 


Davidson 





Furman 


4 


Davidson 


2 


UNCC 


3 


Davidson 





Winthrop 


2 


Davidson 


1 


West Carolina 





Davidson 





(JSC-Spartanburg 


2 


Davidson 


2 


Wofford 


3 


Davidson 


3 


East Tennessee 






Sports 123 



Workouts Lead 

To Undisputed 

Swim Wins 

"Heavens to Mergatroid!" On September 
17th eighteen overweight, out-ofshape, and 
unshaven bodies began what was to prove to 
be an exhausting twelve week premeet train- 
ing schedule. Soon, only a handful were able 
to endure this sadistic dry land program. It 
was evident to the team leaders that attitude 
readjustment was in order. Numerous team 
meetings, often lasting into the wee hours of 
the morning in the history section of David- 
son's former library, were a great impetus in 
boosting team morale. In spite of these efforts 
it was to be several weeks more before the 
team was assured of the services of its pre- 
mier butterflies. 

After a tuneup meet with cross town rivals, 
J.C. Smith's Aqua Bulls, the swimmers set 
their sights on an intense ten-day training 
schedule in riot-stricken Dade County. Howev- 
er, at the last moment, controversy arose con- 
cerning an essential amount of previously en- 
trusted funds. Through the determined negoti- 
ations on the part of the team's captains the 
program was revived and the team remained 
intact. So, despite the efforts of cynics, 
tightwads, and other assorted disbelievers, 
the trip, so crucial to the swimmer's condi- 
tioning became a reality. Amidst roaches, 
rats, and frigid weather, the team put forth a 
joint effort, swimming close to ten miles a 
day. 

Returning in prime shape, the team looked 
forward to a successful season. The outlook 
brightened as the swimmers rolled unchal- 
lenged through their first seven dual meets. 
Consistent performances by distance men 
Mike Schremmer and freshman standout Bill 
Crone allowed the team's constantly aging, 
highly respected coach Pat Miller great flexi- 
bility in organizing lineups. Sophomore back- 
stroker Johnnie Edwards and Junior butter- 
flier/ Imer Craig Finger stood undefeated in 
their events. Other outstanding dual meet per- 
formances were posted by Sprinter Craig Al- 
len and breaststrokers Keith "Tuns of Buns" 
Riddle and Rick "hardass" Williams. Special 
recognition must go to Frank Bright who dove 
brilliantly although forced, due to inadequate 
facilities, to train on his own at a distant nata- 
torium. Davidson's losses came at the hands 
of Furman and Georgia State, two adequately 
funded and therefore constantly improving 
swim teams. The team's record at the close of 
the dual meet season stood at the respectable 
eleven wins and two losses. 

After a well planned, individualized taper 
devised by the team's constantly aging, high- 
ly respected coach Pat Miller, the swimmers 
headed to Charleston and the Southern Con- 
ference Swimming and Diving Champion- 
ships. Here Davidson faced a highly improved 
field of competitors. Through the best efforts 

124 STUDENT LIFE 




of all the swimmers, most notably Warren 
"Brain Cramp" Beck who swam exceptional- 
ly well despite his self-proclaimed lack-luster 
performances in the early dual meet season 
attributable to various disturbances of his 
"physiological state," Davidson placed fourth 
as a team. Don "Spe" Matthews was instru- 
mental in keeping the team off an even keel 
with his witless humor. The swimmers went 
out with a BingBang breaking eleven of nine- 
teen school records. 

The swimmers would like to thank the fol- 
lowing people for their help throughout the 
season: Dr. David Grant, Coach Steve Frank. 
Linda "Boo" Hogan, Alice Packard, THE 
Hammonds, all the student timers, and both 
fans. A special warm thanks to their coach 
Pat Miller who for seven years has both built 
an ever improving swim program and is al- 
ways willing to lend a sympathetic ear to the 
problems of her swimmers; be they aca- 



BREASTSTROKirSG HIS WAY THROaGH THE WA- 
TER. Keith Riddle gasps for air as he nears the wall 
during a practice. 

demic, social, or physical. Pat has achieved 
the proper mix of intense training and time off 
needed for academic excellence and simple 
relaxation. Above all, she has been as much a 
friend to her swimmers as she has been 
coach. We believe she is what Davidson seeks 
as the "ideal coach. " Thanks. Pat. 

-Your Team 1980-81. 








SWIMMINCj 






Won 1 1 Lost / 




Davidson 


87 


JC Smith 


19 


Davidson 


66 


College of Charleston 


45 


Davidson 


67 


SC State 


32 


Davidson 


73 


Citadel 


39 


Davidson 


74 


Appalachian 


39 


Davidson 


65 


VMI 


48 


Davidson 


68 


William & Mary 


45 


Davidson 


72 


Washington & Lee 


39 


rjdvidson 


47 


Furman 


64 


Davidson 


64 


Georgia Tech 


49 


Davidson 


62 


Augusta 


51 


Davidson 


46 


Georgia Stale 


67 


Davidson 


54 


Emory 


43 


4th in Souther 


n Conference Championships 





ABILITY TO PAUSE IN MIDAIR tor the camera during a 
racing dive is a unique skill practiced by Keith Riddle. 
Fortunately Riddle declined to perform this skill during 
most meets 

EXHIBITING THEIR SENSE OF BALANCE. Rick Wil 
liams and Keith Riddle remain poised on the blocks await- 
ing the starters gun 




THE ONCE 'OVERWEIGHT, OUT-OFSHAPE AND ON 
SHAVEN" Ed Imbrogno takes a breath during one of the 
team's intense and exhausting practices. 



SWIMMING TEAM: (First row) Bill Michel. Roy Martin, 
Keith Riddle. Ralph Mosca, Warren Beck, Ed Imbrogno. 
(Second row) Boo Hogan, Rick Williams. Alice Packard, 



Mike Schremmer, Craig Allen, Johnnie Edwards, Bill 
Crone, Brad tlline, Tony Smith. 



Sports 125 



Minor Sport Casts Off Lesser Status 



Davidson's "minor" sports continued to 
prove their worth despite their lesser status, 
and the men's tennis team was no exception. 
The Davidson Wildcats finished a successful 
season at 22-6, placing a strong third in the 
Southern Conference tournament. The sea 
son was the third best for Coach Jeff Frank in 
his nine year career. The Wildcats started off 
the year with a strong 70 mark, defeating 
tough teams such as William and Mary and 
Presbyterian. The netters then ran into power 
houses like North Carolina, M.C. State, and 
South Carolina. The Wildcats played tough, 
but fell short to these nationally ranked 
teams. The team began the Conference 
matches at 50, defeating netters from the 
Citadel, East Tennessee state and VMi. The 
Wildcats then lost to Furman and Appala 
chian, finishing the conference battles at 5 2. 
The team played well in the Conference tour 
ney, losing to well coached teams from GTC 
and Furman. 

The Wildcats obtained tough and consis- 
tant play from all six singles. Three seniors. 
Jay Gepfert, Rick Johnston, and Nick Petrou, 
provided year long leadership. Freshman 
Mark Nottingham also provided strong play 
at No. 2 singles. The other two singles spots 
were filled by sophomore Vic Taylor and ju 
nior Nevins Todd. In the doubles, the Wildcats 
showed great teamwork and tenacity from 
the three duos, GepfertJohnston, Todd-Not- 
tingham, and Petrou-Taylor. 

The Wildcats look to be strong again next 
season, returning three starters and getting 
some top notch freshmen recruits. Hopefully, 
the netters can equal or better their fine year 
of 1981. 

-Nevins Todd 





KEEPING EACH HAIR INTACT. Allen Lazenby finishes a volley at the net 





MENS TENNIS 






Won 


21 Lost 6 




Davidson 


7 


William and Mary 


2 


Davidson 


9 


Slippery Rock 





Davidson 


8 


West Chester 


1 


Davidson 


6 


Penn State 


3 


Davidson 


6 


Atlantic Christian 


3 


Davidson 


5 


Presybterian 


4 


Davidson 


2 


North Carolina 


7 


Davidson 


9 


Wooster 





Davidson 


9 


East Stroudsburg 





Davidson 


9 


Washington and Lee 





Davidson 


9 


Amherst 





Davidson 


8 


MIT 


1 


Davidson 


4 


Ohio University 


5 


Davidson 


8 


Citadel 


1 


Davidson 


7 


VMI 


2 


Davidson 


7 


UNCC 


2 


Davidson 


2 


N.C. State 


7 


Davidson 





South Carolina 


9 


Davidson 


6 


Winthrop 


3 


Davidson 


7 


High Point 


2 


Davidson 


9 


J.C. Smith 





Davidson 





Furman 


9 


Davidson 


8 


East Tennessee 


1 


Davidson 


8 


Marshall 


1 


Davidson 


9 


West Carolina 


1 


Davidson 


3 


Appalachian 


6 


Davidson 


9 


Pfeiffer 







^ 


>/jK ,, ^ 


1 


^^^^^^B^^^ 




^t . 



CAN 
think 



A VENGEFUL FACE add speed to the ball? So 
s Jeff Wall who vidnds up for a backhand. 



THE BACKHAND GRIP of No. 2 singles player Mark 
Nottingham can be closely examined here as can his eye 

concentration. 



WITH EYES PENTRATINO THE TENNIS BALL. Paul 
Griffith brings fiis racket forward on a backfiand 





DEMONSTRATING CONCENTRATED BALL PLACE- 
MENT on his serve, Senior Jay Gepfert extends his body 
to gain height. 

MEN'S TENNIS TEAM: (Front row) Chip Fishback. Bill 
Bennett. John Bradham. Tom Ratchford, Jeff Wall. Paul 
Griffith. (Back row) Lisa Young. Allen Lazenby. Jay Gep>- 
fert. Mark Nottingham. Victor Taylor. Nevins Todd. Nick 
Petrou. Phillip Crowder. Coach Jeff Frank. 



Sports 127 





WOMEN'S TENNIS 






Won 


15 


Lost 2 




Davidson 


9 




UNCAsheville 





Davidson 


9 




Queens 





Davidson 


9 




Converse 





Davidson 


5 




Peace 


4 


Davidson 


9 




Mars Hill 





Davidson 


3 




High Point 


6 


Davidson 


8 




Skidmore 


1 


Davidson 


9 




Gardner Webb 





Davidson 


9 




Winthrop 





Davidson 


8 




Atlantic Christian 


1 


Davidson 


6 




East Carolina 


3 


Davidson 


7 




GNCC 


2 


Davidson 


7 




Guilford 


2 


Davidson 


9 




Pfeiffer 





Davidson 


3 




Appalachian 


6 


Davidson 


6 




(JNCC 


3 


Davidson 


6 




Presbyterian 


3 


NCAIAW D 


vision 


1 S 


ate Champions 




6th out of 


6 team 


s ir 


AIAW Region Tou 


nament 



A NEW DANCE: No. its Leesa McPhail showing that 
sometimes more than natural form is needed. 

WOMEN'S TENNIS TEAM: (First row) Adelyn Lutz. 
Hope McArn. Joanna Fleming. Leesa McPhail, Mary Eli- 
zabeth Cranford. (Second row) Coach Pat Miller. Grace 
Morgan. Catherine Smith. Adelaide Wilcox. Anne Stan 
back. Emmy Knobloch. 




ABOUT TO THRUST THE BALL ACROSS THE 
COURT, lone Freshman Adelyn Lutz stands tiptoed to 
gain an advantage over her opponent 




128 STUDENT LIFE 



Team Smashes To Regionals 



This year the Davidson women's athk-tn 
program was characterized by a striving for 
both public and financial recognition, for an 
equality with the men's program and that 
reaches beyond the season's record. To this 
end, the women's tennis team completed 
their 1980- 1981 season with the best record in 
the history of Davidson women's tennis. Un- 
der the coaching of Pat Miller, the tennis team 
ended Its season with a commendable 16-2 
record. 

The starting line up for the women's team 
included Emmy Knobloch, Hope McArn, 
Anne Stanback, Catherine Smith, Adelaide 
Wilcox, and Adelyn Lutz playing singles and 
the doubles teams of Emmy KnoblochHope 
jAcArn, Anne StanbackGrace Morgan, and 
Catherine Smith-Adelaide Wilcox. High points 
during the season included defeating Peace 
College, a team that Davidson had never be- 
fore beaten, as well as defeating Furman (Jni 
versify. In addition, Emmy Knobloch had an 



undefeated season, a first in the team's histo 

The women's team went on to win the 
ISCAIAW Division II State tournament over a 
field of fifteen teams, edging out favored High 
Point College and strong host team of Guil- 
ford. Individual State champions In singles 
included Emmy Knobloch, Hope McArn, and 
Catherine Smith and the doubles team of 
Catherine Smith Adelaide Wilcox. The team 
went on to play in the Regional Tournament 
which included teams from five states. Four 
girls placed in their individual flights: Knob- 
loch placed fifth, McArn fourth, Wilcox sixth, 
and Lutz third, while the Knobloch McArn and 
Wilcox Smith teams each placed fifth in their 
respective doubles flights. Although the team 
will be losing three strong players, seniors 
Hope McArn, Grace Morgan and Anne Stan- 
back, the outlook for the 1981 1982 season is 
excellent. 

-Mary Elizabeth Cranford 



PLACmC HER RACKET in perfect position might make 
the difference for Senior Hope McArn. one of the three 
girls who won individual State championships 




Sports 129 



TRACK TEAM: (First row) Bart Landess, Steve Ward. 
Gifford Plercy. Dave Stosur, (Second row) John Davis, 
Carl Tolbert, Alec Driskill, Mike Jones. (Third row) Tim 
Ritchie, Todd Cowdery, Dick Jones. Franklin Ivey. Randy 
McManus. (Fourth row) Coach Steve Frank. Brian Brost, 
Jerry Grubba, Stan Klinger, Lance Sisco, Jeff Morrow 

REVVING UP HIS TYPEWRITER, ace race car driver 
Sterling Martin rolls in his paper during a track meet. 





130 STUDENT LIFE 




CAUGHT AT THE FINISH LINE. Barl Undess com 

()l.•l.■^ Ins tdi r witli SltIiihi Mddin Ihrrr to (.iplufe hii 





WOMtNb I RACK 






Won Lost 3 




Davidson 


36 Lynchburg 


90 


Davidson 


41 Appalachian 


86 


Davidson 


47 Lynchburg 

MENS TRACK 
Won 3 Lost 1 


80 


Davidson 


96 Mary Washington 





Davidson 


96 Washington and Lee 


84 


Davidson 


83 Lynchburg 


66 


Davidson 


37 Citadel 


126 


2nd out of 5 


teams in ASCI Invitational 




7th out of 9 teams in Southern Conference Cham | 


pionships 






9th out of 32 teams m Davidson Relays 





Field Rounded Out By Quality Athletes 




SHOWING THE PAINS AT THE END OF A RACE. Beth 
Bryant, a Freshman, kicks in ahead of an Appalachian 
competitor 



The 1981 track season was out of the 
blocks early this year, beginning in November 
of 1980. Largely due to a progrann of difficult 
and disciplined practice, this past year has 
seen the establishment of many personal and 
not a few school records. Distance runners, in 
particular, turned out in large numbers. Head- 
ing the group were Randy McManus (5000 m, 
1500 m); Dave Stosur (800 m); and John Da 
vis (500 m. steeple chase). Next year will see 
the return of John Hoots, currently JYA, and 
with the continued support of Frank Ivey and 
Todd Cowdery, Davidson should field another 
strong team. Outstanding women distance 
runners include Marian Hill (1500 m. 3000 m) 
and Merris Hollingsworth (3000 m). 

In the center of the track, the team also saw 
fine performances from senior Dave Nichols 
at the hammer. Stan Klinger at javelin and 
Ray Sinclair at shot put also put Davidson on 
the board, Klinger taking fifth place in the 
conference. Beth Bryant placed consistently 
well in the discuss throughout the season. 
Jumpers this year were consistent and 
showed continual improvement. Gifford 

BENDING OVER BACKWARDS FOR THE TRACK 
TEAM, Lance Sisco gets a glimpse of the world upside 



Piercy was a standout at long jump; his gradu- 
ation will put the sprinters out as well. Pacing 
the jumpers next year will be Alec Driskill and 
Mike Jones at long and triple jump, and Clark 
Carter and Carl Tolbert at pole vault. Brian 
Brost at high jump and several incoming 
freshman add promise and depth to next 
year's squad. Two underclassmen were a spe- 
cial attribute to the women's team this sea- 
son. Both Laura Hills and Nancy Stoudt were 
high placing long jumpers. 

In sprinting and hurdling events, the team 
was constantly hampered by a number of 
injuries. They were led by senior Dick Jones 
who placed first in the Davidson Relays 400 
I.M. event and fourth in the conference. Other 
key runners were Lance Sisco (110 HH re- 
lays), Leonard Walker (100, 200 relays). Mike 
Jones (100 relays), Jerry Grubba (400 m), and 
Brian Brost (400 m), all of whom return next 
year. One outstanding woman runner will be 
missed next year though. Barb Ashley has 
been a key competitor and support for the 
women's team and her absence will be sorely 
felt next year. Overall, however, the Wildcats 
were pleased with the outcome of the past 
season and look towards next year with opti- 
mism and confidence. -Dick Jones 




Despite numerous illnesses and injuries in 
eluding the ABangkok Flu epidemic, the Da 
vidson Wrestling Team grappled their way to 
the best overall season in recent history. Cin- 
der the leadership of Coach Estock, the Wild- 
cats finished at the .500 mark with an 8-8 dual 
meet record. In Coach Estock's second year 
at Davidson he has improved the record from 
2-9 in the 1979-80 season. Victories over 
Pfeiffer, Furman, Lynchburg and Washington 
and Lee, along with close losses to strong 
teams such as the Citadel, have made the 
WILDCAT 10 a "Force to be reckoned with" 
in Southern Conference competition. The 
Wildcats practice up to three hours a day, 
which along with the normal course load, re- 
quires discipline and sacrifice. 

Suffering from a lack of participants during 
the 1979-80 season, the team forfeited as 
many as four weight classes. With fifteen 
wrestlers finishing the season, the team had 
sufficient depth to fill all ten weight classes. 
In many classes two wrestlers competed in 
challenge matches in practice for the starting 
position. 

Early in the season the team travelled to 
Greenville, South Carolina to wrestle Furman. 
The Wildcats won a close match 31-22 with 
heavyweight Svend Pederson securing the 
victory with a pin. A month later Davidson 
met Furman in Johnston Gym for what some 
die-hard Wildcat fans called the best wrestling 
seen at Davidson in years. The WILDCAT 10 
demolished Furman 51-4. 

Five wrestlers out of the starting line-up of 
ten were freshmen. Todd Kimsey (126) joined 
the team with no previous wrestling exper- 
ience. What Todd lacked in experience he 
made up for with spirit, determination and 
toughness to tally six wins for the Wildcats. 
Freshman standout John Breidenstine (150) 
compiled a 20-1 1-1 record and finished second 
in the Washington and Lee tournament and 
fourth in the Citadel tournament. Freshman 
Eric Hill (118) missed a large portion of the 
season with a knee injury, but he managed to 
amass a 5-9 record by the end of the season. 
Sophomore Tim Brotherton (158) returned for 
a second season of varsity competition to 
contribute six wins to the team. Van Wagner 
(142) endured injuries in the lower back virtu- 
ally all season yet was able to compile a 10-6 
record. Wagner is one of the teams strongest 
and most experienced wrestlers and it is ex- 
pected that he will be in the forefront of con- 
ference wrestling in upcoming seasons. Ju- 
nior Scott Smith (134) compiled a 20-7 record 
during a super season of wrestling which in- 
cluded a second place in the Washington and 
Lee tournament and a third place at the Cita- 
del tournament before being sidelined by a 
knee injury the week of the Southern Confer- 



ence tournament. Smith, who finished fourth 
the previous season, was considered to be in 
contention for the title at the 134 pound 
weight class. Scott will be counted on heavily 
In the upcoming season to provide leadership 
and contribute to the success of the team. 
Senior Svend Pederson tallied two victories 
including a pin against Furman to clinch the 
match. Perhaps the most spectacular Individ 
ual performance of the season was the wres- 
tling of Senior Captain Dave Michols (190). 
Nichols, in his second year of wrestling, 
showed marked improvement over his pre- 
mier year by pinning his way through the 
Washington and Lee tournament and finish- 
ing with a 11-12 record. Many of Michols' 
losses were due to shoulder injuries which 
caused him to injury default during matches. 
Twelve of this year's fifteen wrestlers are 
expected to return next year. These wrestlers, 
coupled with recruits in the fall should make 
for a bright season in 1982. According to an 
optimistic Coach Estock, "The only way to 
go is up." 

— Chris Tiernan 



N'lth 


\ 


Vratl 


1 






WRESTLING 








Won 7 Lost 8 






Davidson 


12 


Catawba 




34 


Davidson 


31 


Pfeiffer 




20 


Davidson 


31 


Furman 




22 


Davidson 


16 


Campbell 




27 


Davidson 





VMl 




50 


Davidson 


24 


Citadel 




32 


Davidson 


36 


Pfeiffer 




18 


Davidson 


26 


Hampden-Sydney 


20 


Davidson 


34 


Lynchburg 




20 


Davidson 


51 


Furman 




4 


Davidson 


36 


Washington 


and Lee 


13 


Davidson 


20 


Elon 




31 


Davidson 


6 


East Carolir 


a 


44 


Davidson 


18 


Campbell 




24 



WITH A GLINT OF DETERMINATION IN HIS EYES, 

Todd Kimsey psyches himself up be for one of his six 
wins. Kimsey's positive attitude led him to be one of the 
five freshman starters. 

WITH HIS OPPONENT IN A "CRADLE ". Scott Smith 
lullabies this Furman wrestler on the way to a decisive 
win. Smith competed for his weight class title until he 
suffered a knee injury late in the season 




132 STUDENT LIFE 



f^ 




WRESTLING TEAM: (First Row) Lisa Lawler. Tim Broth 
erton. John Hughes. Scott Smith, Todd KImsey. Mills 
Antley. Eric Hill, Van Wagner, Chris Gauch. (Second 
Row) Coach Bob Estock, John Breidenstine, Lance 



Stukes, Dave Nichols. Svend Pederson, Bob Kear, Chris 
Tiernan. Tate Nichols, Doug Ammar. Coach Vince Ar- 

duini. 




EXTENSIVE TRAINING ON THE "TWISTER" MAT 

proves useful to Davidson wrestlers. Bob Kear exhibits 
the "right-hand red. left-foot yellow" method on this op- 
ponent. 



Sports 133 




FINDING HIS GUESTS AMOSING. James Baskin 
over the antics of Eric Fichtner and Bun Walter 
Faustus". 



THE TEMPTATIONS AND STRUGGLES ARE END- 
LESS for Dr. Faustus, whio was played by James Baskin, 
as he reveals his torment to Wagner, played by Todd 
Kimsey. 



134 STUDENT LIFE 



Angel and Devil Make Rare 
Appearances 



As the soft stage lights permeated the dark- 
ness, the audience became a part of the land- 
scape around the Dixieland Boarding House in 
Altamont, North Carolina. So began the The- 
atre Department's major fall production of 
Ketti Frings' "Look Homeward, Angel." 

Dr. Rupert Barber directed the seventeen 
member cast of the play based on Thomas 
Wolfe's classic novel. While preparing for the 
production, the cast studied Wolfe and visited 
his former home in Asheville. 

The play, which sold out at almost every 
performance, was performed in Hodson Hall 
on October 30, 31, and on November 1, 6, 7, 
and 8. The department's special Parent's 
Weekend combination dinner and theatre 
package resulted in a packed house. 

This was the first leading role for freshman 
Pat Donley. Donley, who has had previous 
professional training, played the part of Eu- 
gene Gant. 

For two years, Donley attended theatre 
classes at The Walden Theatre in Louisville, 
Kentucky, under the "very fine direction" of 
Mrs. Nancy Sexton. There he attended two 
hour classes after school, returning for night 
rehearsals. 

Although Donley has had only small (most- 
ly Shakespeare) roles in the past, he was 
pleased with the production. He said that 
through the role he "learned that when I ap- 
plied her (Mrs. Sexton) training, I did a fairly 
successful portrayal." However, there was "a 
lot of room for improvement. " he added. 

After a busy winter schedule of student 
directed and produced workshop plays, the 
drama department moved on to its spring 
production of the farce, "Dr. Faustus. " "Doc- 
tor Faustus" a farce? To most the title con- 
jures up images of a dry tragedy. But reading 
Christopher Marlowe's play in English class is 
nothing like seeing the Davidson Theatre De- 
partment's production. "Although the theme 
has tragic potential, " director and drama pro 
fessor Joseph Gardner said, "it has many far- 



cical elements. " Senior James Baskin, who 
played Faustus, agreed. Faustus "is at once 
ridiculous and tragic," he said. 

The department utilized a number of flashy 
production effects and other unusual dramat 
ic devices in its portrayal. The lighting and 
props were spectacular; highlights included 
Mephistopheles' first smokey entrance with 
snake's head and red, glowing eyes and Faust 
us pulling flowers out of thin air. Although 
Marlowe's "Doctor Faustus" is an Elizabe 
than play, it was not done in Elizabethan 
style, as Gardner and cast attempted "to give 
the audience the same "contemporary' exper 
ience that Elizabethan audiences had." The 
costumes, for example, were not from a sin- 
gle historical period, but were designed to fit 
the characters' personalities. Imagine the 
Pope in a white knit suit and pink shirt and 
cardinals in red sunglasses. The design of the 
stage was unconventional as well. An addition 
to the stage projected out over some of the 
seats, with some audience seating on stage. 

The play itself recounted the story of a 
renowned scholar who sells his soul to the 
devil in return for the knowledge and service 
of senior devil Mephistopheles. Faustus' con- 
cern for present pleasure blinds him to his 
future damnation. Gardner and Baskin de- 
scribed several levels of meaning in the play. 
"It is basically a morality play on one level," 
Gardner said, "about a man caught between 
medieval spiritualism and Renaissance hu- 
manism. On another level it approaches a 
fantasy with an almost nightmarish visual 
scene." Baskin also commented on the play- 
wright's personal struggle between theism 
and atheism presented in the play. Although 
Marlowe's first studies were in divinity, he 
turned from them and was later accused of 
being an atheist. His conflict between belief 
and disbelief is "a battle . . . presented before 
the audience," which, Baskin said, "is never 
resolved." 

-Frances Palmer, Anne Goodwin 





A DAREDEVIL PHOTOGRAPHER CLIMBS HIGH above 
the acoustical clouds in Hodson Hall to get a full view of 
the show's progress 

WATCHING OVER THE AUDIENCES SHOULDERS. 

the light and sound crews work silently to make each 
performance a smooth success. 




A LITTLE IS ALL THAT IS NEEDED for this wild Dr 
Faustus '" crew, consisting of Chris Lockwood. Bun Wal- 
ter. Eric Fichtner. and Gary Sloop, to play their roles. 




136 STUDENT LIFE 



Quickies Entertain All 



i 



The winter workshop season is a testing 
ground for experimentation. It offers students 
a chance to take part in all aspects of produc 
tion: direction, designing, acting, lighting, 
sound, costumes, makeup, and box-office. 
Students are put in charge and gain invalu- 
able theatrical experience. 

This workshop season was no different. 
"Aesop's Falables," the first musical chil- 
dren's play, was enjoyed by a wide range of 



JAMES BASKIN GETS CAUGHT IN THE ACT when 
Julie Webber and Melson Simon discover incriminating 
evidence in "What The Butler Saw." 



ages. We laughed our way through "What 
The Butler Saw," then saw two outstanding 
plays by contemporary playwright Israel Hor 
ovitz, "Line" and "The 75th." ""Solitaire" and 
"Doing A Good One for the Red Man" contin 
ued the solid one-set traditions; and the sea 
son ended with the powerful "Love Letters on 
Blue Paper."" 

The 1981 season was a total success, and a 
complete joy to experience. We encourage all 
to involve themselves in this theatre of experi 
mentation. 

— Cindy Faulkenberry 



THE SOLE SURVIVORS AFTER SEVENTY-FIVE 
YEARS. Pat Donley and Laurie Campbell, share an inti 
mate moment on the dance floor in "The 75th '" 

THE TECHNOLOGICAL FUTURE IN 'SOLITAIRE" 

forces strangers Nelson Simon. Annie Guerard, Karen 
Baldwin, and Eric Fichtner to re-enact a family scene. 





LITTLE GIFTS FROM HEAVEN bring stork Esther 
Bruce and sheep Joyce Robinson. Stephanie Moffett. and 
Loy Thornton together in "Aesop's Falables." 



THE FIGHT TO BE FIRST IN "LINE" throws Lindsay 
Robertson, Esther Bruce. Dave Webb, Dave Dusseault. 
and Charlie Lovett into conflict with one another. 



Big Weekend Or Just Big Expectations? 



"I was sick and spent the whole weekend in 
my room blowing my nose. But, I'll bet I had 
more fun than most people!" 

Perhaps more cynical than reality, this 
quote by a Davidson student does typify 
some students' feelings about Big Weekends. 
A major complaint of many Davidson women 
is that the guys ask too many "imports" to 
the Big Weekends, whereas the Davidson 
men complain that there just aren't enough 
available girls to go around as dates. There- 
fore, a dilemma has developed at Davidson. 
Homecoming '80 was no different. There 
was a great influx of imports, both male and 
female, on Friday afternoon, October 16. 
Dorm rooms were full with them all weekend, 
but as usual there was plenty of room, for 
many dateless students chose to spend the 
weekend away from Davidson. 

For freshmen, the prospect of being date- 
less is not too devastating because halls gen- 
erally stick together throughout the weekend. 
Many other students choose to spend a major 
part of the weekend in a non-Davidson atmo- 
sphere, such as going out to eat, seeing a 
movie, or going bar-hopping in nearby Char- 
lotte. This phenomenon occurs even though 
there are many activities going on around 
campus. 

These activities — though generally the 
same every year — were held under the pre- 
carious theme, "The Roaring Twenties". Only 
a few of the activities on campus were even 



slightly related to the theme, but this fact 
didn't keep the events from being entertain- 
ing. 

The Big Weekend officially began with the 
Top Hats and Cat Tails student talent show 
held on Thursday evening. Pianist Keith 
Hearle received first prize for individual talent; 
the Wally Beaver Band won the group talent 
award. A British Rock Disco in the 900 Room 
followed the show. 

Friday evening entertainment included a 
concert by The Nighthawks in Love Audito- 
rium with parties on Patterson Court and 
comedy flicks in the 900 Room afterward. 

The traditional football game on Saturday 
afternoon was a disappointment to many, as 
the 'Cats fell to Lehigh University, and as rain 
fell on the 'Cats and their supporters. Junior 
Lisa Harbottle was crowned Homecoming 
queen by last year's queen, senior Lisa Hasty. 
Also present on stage for the crowning was 
Davidson student Janet Ward Black, who re- 
presented North Carolina in the Miss America 
pageant in September. Halftime entertain- 
ment was provided by the Mooresville High 
School marching band, and the program was 
opened by speeches honoring Concord Appre- 
ciation Day. Much of the crowd deserted Rich- 
ardson Field after the halftime festivities, 
however, as the rain began to fall harder, and 
parties on Patterson court began earlier than 
expected. 

The annual Homecoming dance in John- 




ston Gym was held from 9:00 p.m. until 1:00 
a.m. The Entertainers played Top 40 hits, 
rock and beach music for a surprisingly large 
crowd, despite the continued bad weather. 

The College Union was busy Saturday 
evening as stand-up comedian Jim Hanna of 
Charlotte's Comedi Inn entertained in the 900 
Room. Hanna performed several times 
throughout the evening, as pianist Karl Rosen 
alternated shifts with him, resulting in con- 
tinuous entertainment. The last official activ- 
ity of the weekend was a breakfast in the 900 
Room at which Hanna humored a late-night 
crowd. No events were planned for Sunday, 
as it was expected that students would need a 
day to recover before the normal Davidson 
routine set in again on Monday. 

-Jim Reese 

AN "ANIMAL HOUSE" REJECT, Matt Kinney finds use 
for fiis toga at one of the first Patterson Court Homecom- 
ing events — the ATO Medieval dinner. 



INCLUDED IN THE 1980 HOMECOMING COURT were 
first runner up. Kirby Owen, who was escorted by Gray 
Bullard. and queen Lisa Harbottle. who was escorted by 
Doug Shanks 




THE SECOND CENTER AMBASSADORS provide wild AT THE SAE POST GAME CELEBRATION. Pele tolling 
enlertainment for Ihe traditional Top Hats and Cat enjoys his cocktail and his date, import Mary Jo Meredith 
Tails" talent show of the University of Tennessee 




Midwinters: The Ranch Comes To Campus 




The Urban Cowboy Weekend of January 30 
and 31 was Midwinters with a different twist. 
Rather than coming decked out in their for 
mals, according to tradition, students arrived 
at the big dance wearing denim, checkered 

ALL PRESENT AT THE HERBIE MANN CONCERT wit 

nessed Manns new approach to jazz music which includ 
ed many untitled songs. 



THE ENERGETIC PAULA LARKE gave an outstanding 
performance Saturday night of Midwinters in the intimate 
900 Room. 





shirts, leather boots, and cowboy hats. The 
Midwinters dance, which is usually formal, 
was changed when it was decided to switch 
the formal from winter to spring. 

The weekend began on the 30th with an 
evening of jazz by Herbie Mann and his band. 
In his concert, Mann demonstrated his new 
style and concept of music, in which he feels 
the audience can participate through the feel- 
ings which the music provokes. The concert 
was followed by parties at many of the 
houses on the court, which offered a choice of 
bands and fancy drinks. 

The highlight of the weekend was the 
dance on Saturday night with "Threshold" 
and "Lightning West" providing a continuous 
flow of music throughout the evening. There 
was also a mechanical bull for the adventur- 
ous ones who wanted to demonstrate their 
bravery or skill. 

Paula Larke, a light rock and blues musi- 
cian, sang in the 900 Room both nights. With 
her lively personality and her funny songs, 
she created great audience participation, 
making it a fun alternative for everyone who 
attended. Her performance on Saturday was 
followed by the Union's Midwinters breakfast. 
ATO also sponsored a waffle house on the 
court after the dance. 

The Midwinters Urban Cowboy Weekend 
did indeed "sweep us off our feet," just as it 
was promised to do. 

— Caroline Boudreau 




A KISS ON THE CHEEK by Brenda Baker is a welcome 
surprise for Marl< Gillespy at F & Ms party on Friday 
night 

TIES ARE STILL "IN" at most parties on Patterson 
Court, such as this Midwinters party at the KA house 
attended by Stan Hynds. Margaret Evans. Joyce Robin- 
son, and Jack Hall. 



Events 141 



It Only Takes A Dash Of Energy To Frolic 



Take four fifths of rum, half a cup each of 
gin and brandy, one bottle of Falernum, 32 oz. 
of lemon juice, 16 oz. of orange juice and mix 
them together in a trash bag. Add ice and 
distribute liberally between eight people. This 
recipe for disaster goes a long way to explain 
how I spent the afternoon concert, and why 
so many of you have, in the background of 
your photographs, a group of red cheeked 
rowdies, dancing and cavorting with gay 
abandon. Our "scorpion" sure had a sting in 
its tail though; and had you visited some of 
the rooms on campus on Friday night, you 
would have encountered eight rather more 
subdued, or should I say totally subdued char- 



acters. 

"I think it would be fun to write an article 
about Spring Frolics for the Yearbook, a for- 
eigner's view of it, I mean," — that's what I 
had said, and now here I was on the first day, 
head in hands, wondering what exactly had 
happened at the Outdoor Concert. I remem- 
ber the haul up to the hill to the field, and the 
crowds of semi-clad sunbathers and frisbee- 
players; I even remember some snatches 
from the first band's set, but beyond that I 
draw a blank. It's frightening, at eighteen, 
already to be "missing" hours from your life, 
but three of mine got permanently mislaid on 
April 10th. The only possible consolation is 




that the general consensus of opinion on the 
Robbin Thompson Band is that they were not 
very memorable. 

Even a "scorpion " loses its sting eventual 
ly, and after some recuperative hours of 
barfing and Bayer's, I miraculously felt ready 
for a band party. Leaving a less-well-recov- 
ered roommate in our darkened room (phone 
unplugged, of course) I lit out, somewhat 
shakily, for Patterson Court. By virtue of a 
$10 social fee I was eligible for a cocktail or 
two at PAX. Politely declining all proferred 
"white russians " and "whisky sours", I 
nursed my shattered body with coke and pret- 
zels. Like a blood-donor eating Nipchees, I felt 
the immediate benefits of sugar and salt in a 
revived pulse and quickening heartbeat. I was 
all set for round two. At about 10:30 we made 
a move for the KA house, and the Sponge- 
tones. It is some indication of the remarkable 
healing properties of Coca-Cola, and of the 
resilience of young bodies in general, that I 
danced until 1 a.m. 

Day Two dawned — for all the World at six. 
for me at noon. In the interests of journalism I 
was determined to run the 1:00 p.m. obstacle 
race, so I showered and shortedup in prepara- 
tion. A little late in starting, and a lot longer 
than I had hoped, the race was a real chal- 
lenge . . . How is a foreigner supposed to 
know who won the National Basketball Cham- 
pionships, or a Rusk Scholar to know the 
Alma Mater, and how is anyone supposed to 
blow three bubble-gum-bubbles, run a mile 




THE VERSATILE PERFORMERS OF LOCOMOTION 
VAUDEVILLE entertained a crowd of young and ; i n 
(rent of Cfiambers on Saturday afternoon 

BALLOONS COOLD BE FOUND EVERYWHERE - r 
day afternoon of Spring Frolics weekend. Margaret Holt 
chews on tfie string of hers as she talks to some friends. 



142 STUDENT LIFE 



and a half, eat a banana, participate in a 
round of Dizzy-Lizzy, and do a crossword puz 
zle (to name but a few of thie tortures en 
dured). Minth place was nnine for my trouble, 
however, and with it came a Donald Duck cup 
of almost inestimable worth, which made it 
seem almost worth it. Sadly the 75 ft. banana 
split was little more than a soupy dribble by 
the time we jocks had returned to base, so I 
cannot vouch for its success, although from 
the number of sticky infants milling about, I 
can only assume that it was extremely palat- 
able when still fresh. Another quick change 
and I was back out, to watch Locomotion 
Vaudeville and catch come rays. It was an 
idyllic afternoon; everyone, even hardened 
cynics like myself, enjoys a good show, espe- 
cially in such balmy weather. Squeals of glee 
from the Davidson Under 7's Club failed to 
irritate even the most hungover among us. 
and the unicycling and acrobatics were of the 
highest possible quality. 

Of Spring Frolics there remained only the 
semi-formal Dance, and all the femine charms 
I could muster had failed to secure me a date 
for the evening. My only defense against pos 
sible peer scorn . . . "That girl with the globe 
in her ear failed to find a date, I see" . . was, I 
decided, to turn by back on the whole affair, 
and spend the evening in Charlotte. Pausing 
only to attend a "shrimperoo" at PAX, I set 
off with a group of like-minded fellow-wa 
flowers for the bright lights of the throbbing 
metropolis. It was an abortive evening: failing 
to get in to see "Ordinary People," we sat 
glumly in Eastland Mall's Farrell's . . . "You 



mean you've never been to Farrell's? We 
must take you there, it's just awful" We 

were home by 11:30, and suddenly felt an 
overwhelming desire to go to the dance after 
all. My roommate rustled up a date and set 
off; I followed ten minutes later, dateless 
but determined I had interpreted "semi- 

formal" rather loosely I realized when I swept 
past the people on the door, shouting "It's 
O.K. Yearbook." There I was in a room 

full of tuxed up and gowneddown couples, 
perhaps the only girl without a date, certainly 
the only girl in black satin pants. Feeling un 
comfortably conspicuous. I did my best to 
mingle, dancing nervously between couples 
and dreading the inevitable "slow"" number, 
when close dancing would begin, and I would 
be exposed for the wretc hed single that I was 



I did eventually locate a couple of other sin 
gles with whom to dance, but it was essential 
ly a voyeuristic experience. I could only really 
conclude that it would have been fun, had I 
summoned up an escort, but as it was I felt 
unsuitably non-conformist and awkward. 
Luckily you do not need a date to eat crepes, 
and the metaphorical sun went down on my 
Spring Frolics as I sat eating run-banana pan- 
cakes at ATO, early Sunday morning. No one 
feels like a wallflower when they have a 
mouthful of rum bananas 

Miranda Morrison 



IT REMAINS UNKNOWN WHETHER THE BEER. THE 
SUN. OR THE MUSIC, fdustd thp imiles on the laces o( 
Hatriel Holihuiisen and James Funilen, but rest assurer) 
tliey enjoyed the ouldoor concert on Friday alternoori 




WHO'LL TAKE THE LEAD? Carole Jolley and Andrew 
Wilson tx)th had the chance to pull their tuxedoes out of 
the closet and put them to use at the Spring Frolics 
dance Saturday night. 

FLIPPING FOR THE WAITRESS. Pete Neefus and New 
ton Allen exhibit their cooking skills, for an unidentified 
worker at the ATO Crepe Breakfast held after the dance. 



(( 



We Are Gathered Here Today 



Convocation, graduation, initiation 
■tion, ■tion,-tion.They all sound the same, they 
all involve a group of people, some speakers, 
some awards, and the sense of accomplish- 
ment presiding over the whole affair. 

So what's different about convocation? 
And what's more, why do we need two of 
them? 

Convocation is essentially just the assem- 
bly of a group of people called together for 
the purpose of meeting. At Davidson, convo- 
cation serves to gather the student body, the 
faculty, and the administration together to 
recognize particular students and faculty 
members for outstanding achievements, and 
to make the major issues of the college 
known to all. Because Davidson has many 
outstanding achievers and many major is 
sues, two convocations are needed. 

Fall convocation was held November 1, 
1980. President Samuel Spencer was the 
main speaker and delivered an appropriate 
message concerning the need to strengthen 
Davidson's curriculum. His speech was sup- 
ported by the remarks of Charles W. Bray, 
Deputy Director of the U.S. International 
Communication Agency. 

Awards presented at Fall Convocation are 
as follows: The Thomas Jefferson Faculty 
Award, the college's top faculty honor, was 
awarded to Dr. J. Nicholas Burnett for his 
personal influence, teaching, writing, and 
scholarship; the Alumni Association Fresh- 
man Award, which is presented annually to 
the sophomore with the highest academic 




OPTING FOR THE 'DISTINGUISHED GRADUATE' 
LOOK, Susan Beesley and Julia Eichelberger enter Love 
Auditorium for Spring Convocation. 



144 STUDENT LIFE 



average, was presented to three students with 
a perfect 4.0 average, Elizabeth Kiss, Sara 
Wheeler, and Edward Whitesides; Davidson's 
ROTC department presented Department of 
the Army Superior Cadet Awards to senior 
David K. Green, junior Carl Wilson Sofley, and 
sophomore Todd Cowdery; the Association of 
the U.S. Army Award for a junior military 
science cadet went to Beth Ellen Gyauch. 

In addition to these awards, Will Terry an 
nounced the 28 Davidson students to be in- 
cluded in the 1980-81 edition of Who's Who 
Among Students in American Colleges and 
Universities. They are Kathryn Adkins, Kath- 
erine Allen, Barbara Ashley, Alvin Atkinson, 
David Barkley, Bill Dascombe, John Davis, 
Sherri Gravett, Lisa Hasty, Karen Hester, Ju- 
lie Holding, Turley Howard, Hope McArn, 
Clay Macauley, Elizabeth Medlin, Tim New- 
comb, Kirby Owen, Julia Pidgeon, John Por- 
ter, Kevin Pressley, Blain Sanders, Minor Sin- 
clair, Anne Stanback, Richard Terry, David 
Waddill, Kevin Wheelock, Ben McCall, and 
Cameron Zurbruegg. 

Spring Convocation, held on April 24th, 
was addressed by author Tom Wolfe. Widely 
known as the leading "New Journalist, " 
Wolfe gained notoriety during the mid-1960's 
with books on subcultures within American 
society. Wolfe's convocation speech was enti- 
tled "The Rediscovery of America," with the 
general theme that "after eight-one years of 
the 20th century we're finally beginning to 
look at the country in a reasonable way. 
We've had a major change in the intellectual 
climate in the past five years." The change 
must have been for the better, as Wolfe highly 
praised the work that he judged for the Ver- 
een Bell Award as professional quality. The 
Vereen Bell Memorial Award for Creative 
Writing was established by family and friends 
in memory of Bell, a member of the class of 
1932, who gave his life for his country in 
World War II. It is awarded to upperclass stu- 
dents for excellence in creative writing. Wolfe 
presented the award to Eddie Harrison, with 
Martin Clark designated as first runner-up and 
Elizabeth Kiss and Nick Graham second run- 
ners-up. in addition to the Bell Award, Wolfe 
also judged and presented the R. Windley Hall 
Memorial Award which is awarded to a stu- 
dent in the freshman class for excellence in 
creative writing. The award was presented to 
Earl Wooten. 

Additional general awards presented were 
as follows: The Agnes Sentelle Brown Award, 
awarded to an upperclassman of outstanding 
character, personality, intellectual ability, and 
scholarship, was presented by Will Terry to 
junior Stuart Dorsett; the Charles Malone 
Richards Award, given to a rising senior, ordi- 
narily one preparing for the ministry, whose 
academic record, participation in campus ac- 
tivities, and contribution to the community 
religious life are outstanding, was presented 
by Terry to Jeff Wall. 

Also awarded was the George L. Gladstone 
Memorial Award, awarded to a rising senior 
exhibiting high potential for service to man- 



kind in leadership, service to community, and 
academic record, presented by C. Shaw 
Smith to Betsy Thomas. The Rebecca F. 
Stimson Award, given to the woman student 
best typifing the Davidson spirit in athletic 
competition and campus leadership, was pre- 
sented by Price Zimmermann to Cathy Inab- 
net. David Nichols received the Tommy Pe- 
ters Award for the athlete best typifying the 
Davidson spirit in athletics and campus lead- 
ership. Julia Pidgeon presented students for 
initiation into Omicron Delta Kappa, a nation- 
al leadership society founded to recognize 
eminence in five phases of campus life: schol- 
arship, athletics, social and religious activi- 
ties, publications and forensic, dramatic, 
musical, and other cultural activities. Those 
students initiated are as follows: Kathy Ad- 
kins, Steve Austin, Lisa Ballantyne, David 
Barkley, Rob Campany, Danny Klinar, Terry 
Knox, Mark Shogry, Rhett Thompson, Nancy 
Wright, Bobby Ervin, Ellen Gyauch, Chip Le- 
gerton, Ann Parker, Bill Purcell, John Siman, 
John Spangler, Betsy Thomas, Nevins Todd, 
and Jim Troutman. 

The final general award presented was the 
ODK Teaching Award, which is awarded to a 
professor chosen on behalf of the Davidson 
student body by the members of ODK for 
demonstrating outstanding teaching ability. 
Dr. Jerry Putnam was the recipient of the 
award. 

Departmental awards were also presented 
and the winners are as follows: The Sandy 
Black Memorial Award, awarded to the out- 
standing senior pre-medical student, was giv- 
en to Craig White; the David Halbert Howard, 
Jr., Chemistry Award was presented to Wai, 
ren Beck, who demonstrated promise of high 
usefulness in a field of service requiring 
knowledge of Chemistry; Joan Redding re-' 
ceived the Presser scholarship, which is given, 
to an outstanding music major in the rising' 
senior class; Mott McDonald was awarded the 
A.K. Phifer Award for his distinguished record^ 
in the study of economics. ) 

The Jefferson Davis Award, presented to a 
student who has excelled in the study of Con- 
stitutional Law, was won by Clarence Del-- 
forge. James Baskin received the Bremer Ger- 
man Language Award for excellence in the 
study of German. Alvin Atkinson received the 
Thomas D. Spanow Award in recognition of 
outstanding dedication and contribution to in- 
tercollegiate athletics, and the Susan Roberts, 
Award was awarded to Barb Ashley in recog-l 
nition of her dedication and contribution to 
intercollegiate athletics. The James Baker' 
Woods, III, Memorial Award is awarded to ci 
rising senior ROTC cadet of outstanding lead- 
ership, character, academic achievement, 
and military aptitude. Jeff Wright was thej 
recipient of this award. The George C. Mar-, 
shall ROTC Award, awarded to the outstand- 
ing M.S. IV cadet, was presented to David 
Green, and the Daniel Blain Woods Award, 
which is given to the rising senior pre-medical 
student best exhibiting the qualities of a good 
doctor, was presented to John Spangler. 




In addition to speeches and awards, the 
students selected for the honor of Phi Beta 
'^appa were formally announced. They are 
Cathy Adkins, Katherine Allen, Steve Austin, 
.isa Ballantyne, Debbie Bland, Rob Campany, 
.aurie Campbell, Katherine Christie, Martin 
Hark, Hugh Crenshaw, John Davis, Chris El- 
vood, Robin Eubanks, Bob Evans, Mike Fitz- 
gerald, William Flanagan, Eric Frey, Julie Gi- 
bert. Sherri Gravett, Joyce Hoffman, John 
olland, Peter Jordan, Harold Lloyd, Ralph 
Mosca, Tim Newcomb, John Niblock, Walter 
Pharr, Anna Phipps, John Porter, James 
Reich, David Rhodes, Blaine Sanders, Mark 
Shogry, James Tholen, Rhett Thompson, Liz 
Upchurch, David Waddiil. and David Walls. 

•Lisa Sloan 



RETURNING FOR CONVOCATION, professors emeriti 
Hopkins, Daggy. McGeachy. and Worknnan gather before 

the festivities begin 



CONGRATULATIONS WERE IN ORDER for Ellen 
Gyauch. recipient of tfie Association of the US Army 

Award, which was presenter! hv <"OI fJoqfr F Pnwpjl 




KNOWN AS THE LEADING 'NEW JOURNALIST'. Tom 
Wolfe spoke on "'The Rediscovery of America " at Spring 
Convocation. 




GRADUATION 

Pomp, Mixed Emotions, And A 

New Beginning Confront Class 

Of 1981 



Always a solemn occasion, the 1981 graduation cere- 
mony at Davidson continued the tradition. While the 
Wind Ensemble played, the academic procession formed 
and led in the 293 graduates. There could not have been a 
better day weather-wise on which to hold graduation, for 
the warm sunshine was alleviated by a cool breeze, which 
helped keep the crowd at ease. 

Thomas Hartley Hall, IV, president of Union Theologi- 
cal Seminary in Virginia, gave the opening prayer, which 
was followed by the national hymn and a scripture read- 
ing by Minor Sinclair, past president of the Y-Student 
Service Corps. 

The Algernon Sydney Sullivan Award was presented 
to Anne Stanback in recognition of her service to the 
college. Announcements for first and second honors in 

BENEATH THE TREES graduates of the class of 1981 file into the 
Davidson College Presbyterian Church for the Baccalaureate Service 
held Saturday, May 23. 




the graduation class and for the class gift, a donation for 
a piano in memory of Mr. Donald Plott, followed. Rrst 
honor in the class went to David Walls, while Walter 
Pharr received second honor. 

After an anthem sung by the Male Chorus, the confer- 
ring of degrees began. Honorary degrees were presented 
to Henry Brash Abrahams (Doctor of Laws), John Bright 
(Doctor of Divinity), Thomas Hartley Hall, IV (Doctor of 
Humane Letters). Then, the degrees in course were pre- 
sented to the entire class of '81, after which followed 
whoops and cheers of relief. 

Family and friends of the graduates were seen milling 
around campus after the graduation ceremony — and 
practically all weekend, for there were ceremonies held 
on Saturday for ROTC commissioning and Baccalaure 
ate. Commissions presented by Major General James A. 
Grimsley, Jr., president of The Citadel, went to seniors 
Tim Bethea, David Green, Dave Nichols, David Poe, 



Yates Sealander, Jorge Silveira, and Hal Wahl. 

The Baccalaureate Service was held Saturday evening 
in the College Church. John Bright, professor emeritus at 
Union Theological Seminary in Virginia, gave the sermon 
entitled "The Christian's Peace". Immediately following 
the service was a dinner for seniors and their parents on 
Richardson Plaza. The evening's festivities ended with a 
concert by the Male Chorus in Love Auditorium. The 
opportunity remained for seniors to see their fellow stu- 
dents as such for the last time, and groups congregated 
at various spots around campus sharing stories and remi- 
niscing about their good times at Davidson. For the 293 
seniors, the moment for which they had worked the past 
four years came at 12 noon when commencement exer- 
cises were finalized by the conferring of degrees. 

■Jim Reese 




Xiraduation 



What's next? Lately, those students of the senior per- 
suasion have muddled and stewed over this question, 
some with enthusiasm, others wtih trepidation. Most of 
us have been students for as long as we can remember. It 
has become a way of life. We start our year in September 
and consider the summer months drastically different, by 
nature, from the rest of the year. Two a.m. is thought to 
be a fairly reasonable hour to go to'bed or even to make a 
latenight Big Wheel run. It's hard to believe that all of 
this will change. Nevertheless, the days tumble quickly 
toward graduation, when we are catapulted into our Fu- 
ture. Some people move gracefully through this transi- 
tion period in their lives, while others of us must be 



dragged, kicking and screaming, to meet our destiny. In 
the spring, seniors develop certain distinctive characteris- 
tics that become more pronounced as graduation nears. 
Seniors tend to wince and cringe at any questions con- 
cerning the future. Whether it's about their life plans, or 
what they're doing this weekend. When asked about 
careers, seniors skirt the questions with evasive answers, 
such as, "I'm examining several alternatives," or "I'm 
keeping my options open," rather than the more direct, "I 
have no idea." One senior, when asked, "What color is 
your parachute?" replied, "Mine has yet to open." At 
times, panic seems a reasonable response to graduation 
as the future looms dark, with jaw agape that hint of 




MIXED EMOTIONS were experienced by graduates following the Cor 
lonies. House-mates Laurie Campbell and Hope 
, -fer congratulations following the ceremony. 

PRESIDING OVER THE COMMENCEMENT CEREMONY was Samuel 
R. Spencer, Jr.. President of the college. Dr. Spencer presented each 
graduate with his diploma. 




unknown anxieties such as dental bills, car payments, 
and dubious employment opportunities. 

But graduation involves more than facing the future. 
The most difficult part is what we must leave behind: Big 
Oranges at the M & M; 10 a.m. post office runs; flexible 
hours; free beer; cookouts at the lake campus; awkward 
freshman mixers where everyone shuffles their feet a lot; 
long talks around the kitchen table with close friends; the 
dogwoods and azaleas so beautiful in the spring that they 
take your breath away. We think of the truly fine people 
we have known, how we have grown because of them, 
and how much we love them. But we also think of our 
last Davidson exam and term paper, our last academic 



all-nighter and drop«dd line. Walking across campus at 
dusk, I want to drink in the serenity and hold it, ckxe. 
knowing that I am leaving. There are a few regreU — 
courses left untaken, people I admire but hardly know, 
many things left undone. Unfortunately, time and matrk:- 
ulatlon wait for no man, or woman, and we must be 
content. Yet, even with the hard times and the regrets, 
it's been a remarkable four years. With great appreciation 
and tenderness, we look back on our Davidson years, as 
graduation, that "rough beast, its hour come round at 
last" pushes and prods us, willingly or no, into the future 
that awaits. 

-Aurie Hall 




A FRIEND FROM HOME . . . Lucy Bedinger receives congratulations from 

her family pet who attended the graduation ceremonies. 

A SMIRK AND A QUIRK . . . Jacl< Hall finds an element of humor in the 
often alltoosolemn Commencement ceremony, held outside in front of the 
Dana Science building. 




# "9 


''^'<K-i 


ILJ 


A HINT OF CURIOSITY captures one rollerskate 
donned child as members of the Class of 1981 Rle 
past. 



M 1' ■-» 



Ranked nationally, the College Bowl team is 

Quick To The Buzzer 



Davidson College In a bowl game? But no, it 
is not in the Sugar Bowl or the Rose Bowl that 
Davidson shines. It is the College Bowl where 
of we speak, and one need not be a 200 lb. 
hulk to play. In the College Bowl, players 
exchange information rather than bruises; 
success is measured In trivia rather than 
yards. For the second time in three years, 
Davidson has proved its merit in the national 
arena, this year placing second to ACC power-| 
house Maryland and racking up an impressivel 
13-3 record in the process. 

Coach Hansford Epes called his team to- 
gether in September for an unusually early 
start to the season. In an impending tourna- 
ment hosted by CBS radio and scheduled for 
early October in New Jersey, three consecu- 
tive wins would qualify a team for the nation- 
als. Members of the hastily constructed team 
included Tim Newcomb, Julie Gibert, and 
Bob Evans, all of whom had served on last 



BEHIND EVERY WINNER is a solid group of coaches. 
Charlie Lloyd, Hansford Epes and Bob Manning served 
the 1981 team. 



RANKED SECOND IN THE U.S. Davidson's College 
Bowl team is comprised of Bob Evans, Hansford Epes 
(coach), Tim Newcomb, Ed Trumbull and Julie Gibert. 




CONCENTRATION registers on the faces of Julie Gibert 
and Marvin Overby during a spring practice round with 
the upcoming 1982 team. 

TRIGGER FINGER READY. Richard Page listens to the 
question in a practice round. 



150 STUDENT LIFE 



years national championship team. Ed Trum time was the (Jniversity of Tennessee. All four 



out of retirement to complete the roster. The 
team worked long hours to restore their 
quickness, the essential feature of any really 
good College Bowl team. 



the nationals with little trouble. 

A lull in the season provided an opportuni- 
ty for the members of the team to help finish 
up the intramural College Bowl tournament 



(Tempered In the Regional tourna 

- -arly February, where the team lost 

to UNC-Chapel Hill after sending them to the 
loser's bracket in an earlier match. 

March 18 saw the team off to Huntington, 
West Virginia, for the nationals. The field of 



l;:!^:™.!^,;"":™™".'..?'.? '^'1 -': •■'■""™" '".}'- -"-" "- »"« -"" ti.ii.Zr. bT.rr"m 3; Z"^ 



at Vandy 230. Davidson 235. Dr. Epes re 
quested that in the future the team refrain 

from similar rM>rfnrm;«nroc ac ha haH noarlt. 



suffered a heart attack towards the close of 
the game. In a second match the team disap- 
pointed New Jerseys Rider College, which 
had been hoping for a trip to Charlotte for 
November's games. 

In mid-November the Davidson team jour- 



year. Picking the five best players from a fine 
intramural field was perhaps the year's tough- 



team's alternate and a B-team consisting of 
John Eglin. Richard Page, Gordon Turnbull, 
and captain Brad Mullis was selected. With 

thf> tniinh n»u/ »ssim »n nr^^ti^o >...: t. i 



With the help of faculty members Bob Man- 
ning, Randy Nelson, and Charles Lloyd, as 



three CBS radio games. The opponent this razor edge for the nationals in March. That 



sudden-death question in overtime. Subse- 
quent victories over Harvard and the home 



.^— .. V*. .-.aiaiiaii uiiiveraiiy seni uaviason 
into the finals against the University of Mary- 
land. The team got off to a low start and, 
although outscoring Maryland in the second 



this heartbreaking loss, the Davidson College 
Bowl team maintained its reputation for excei- 

! year. 
-Ed Trumbull 



Five Times In Love Is Not Enough 



In an attempt to broaden the cultural 
opportunities present at Davidson, the Col- 
lege Gnion welcomes annually a series of 
nationally acclaimed fine arts performers. 

The first presentation of the 1980-81 Art- 
ist Series Committee was the classical gui- 
tarist Michael Lorimer. A student of 
Andres Segovia, Lorimer is a man of great 
talent. One of his more impressive pieces 
was a traditional Spanish Sacrament ori- 
ginally composed for the piano, which he 
had translated for the guitar. 

Following Michael Lorimer, Pat Carroll 
captivated students and faculty with her 
moving portrayal of Gertrude Stein. This 
was an individually performed biography 
of Gertrude Stein and her relationships 
with the great artists of the 20th Century, 
particularly Pablo Picasso. Not only was 
Ms. Carroll entertaining, but she also 
sought to leave her audience with a mes- 
sage, "know yourself". Her performance 



was well received, and highly praised for 
its originality and uniqueness. 

In addition to these performances, the 
Artist Series hosted Broadway's inventive 
mime group, Mummenschanz. This troupe 
from Sweden captured Davidson's heart 
with their outstanding mime, acrobatics, 
and audience participation games. They 
had obviously done their homework on 
who's who at Davidson, as they chose 
Price Zimmerman as the subject for their 
"creative taping" display. 

Following Mummenschanz came the 
North Carolina Dance Theater. Their per- 
formance began with traditional dances 
and costumes and ended with a fantastic 
series of modernistic dance interpreta- 
tions, complete with unusual costumes 
and painted faces. 

A special performance of the Charlotte 
Symphony Chamber Orchestra, conduct- 
ed by Leo Driehuys was held on December 



1st. Their repetoire ranged from obscure to 
modern, from classical to pop. Most popu- 
lar with the audience were a traditional 
Beethoven's Fifth, and a more unusual per- 
formance of the overture from the Mar- 
riage of Figaro. 

Lindsay Biddle, chairman of the Artists 
Series Committee, commented that the 
new cultural performances attract not only 
the Davidson community, but patrons of 
the arts from a large surrounding area. 
This must be true, as the tickets were 
quickly sold-out, and Love Auditorium was 
filled for each of these outstanding cultural 
events. 

■Lisa Sloan 



BROADWAY COMES TO LOVE AGDITORiaM as 

the extraordinary mime celebration Mummenschanz 
delighted and mystified the Davidson audience. 




152 STUDENT LIFE 




I 



V 






NEXT BEST THING TO THE BOSTON POPS, the 

Charlotte Symphony Chamber Orchestra, conducted 
by Leo Driehuys charmed the loyal Artists Series 
audience. 



CLASSICAL AND MODERN DANCE by the North 
Carolina Dance Theatre was highlighted by multico- 
lored costumes and a variety of prerecorded music. 




EMMY AWARD-WINNING PAT CARROLL gave a 
performance as Gertrude Stein that will long be re- 
membered as nothing less than incredible. 




154 STUDENT LIFE 



Belk Gets Presidential Treatment 



A United Stdtes President visited ttie Djvid 
son cannpus this year for the first time in over 
half a century. Former President Gerald Ford 
attended a dinner May 4 in honor of former 
Charlotte Mayor John Belk '43 and spoke 
later in the evening before an enthusiastic 
audience in Love Auditorium. The exPresi- 



T.V. STAR FOR A DAY. Davidson made the news on 
May 4th when former President Ford visited campus 
Reporters from all over the Carolinas covered the event 




dent's visit was organized by former SGA 
President David Waddill and sponsored by the 
SGA and the Stuart Scholarship foundation. 

Ford, who had just completed a world tour, 
presented his views on foreign policy prob- 
lems facing the new administration. He said 
he detected general support for President Rea- 
gan's economic policies among the foreign 
leaders he visited. "If we in the U.S. don't 
have a strong economy most of the world will 
suffer," said Ford. He also said the leaders 
generally supported Reagan's firm stance to- 
ward the G.S.S.R., though there was uniform 
"apprehension in regards to any military en- 
gagement between the superpowers." 

Ford focused on three politically unstable 
areas of the globe: Poland, the Middle East, 
and China. He said he expected the threat of a 
Soviet invasion of Poland to remain high for 
perhaps several months to come. "In this in 
stance the Soviet Union faces a serious dilem- 
ma. On one hand there is a gradual undermin- 
ing of Communist party control. If this contin- 
ues, with independent farmer and worker 
groups getting stronger, the Communist party 
will inevitably lose its grip. If so, it is also 
inevitable that similar movements will devel- 
op in Czechoslovakia, Rumania, Hungary and, 
most importantly for the Russians, in East 
Germany. Should this movement spread, the 
domination of the Soviet Union in Eastern 
Europe will come to an end. This could lead 
to an eventual end of unanimity within the 
Warsaw Pact itself." 

Ford went on to call for new American 



initiatives in the Middle East suggesting that 
the U.S. continue to build on previous step-by 
step efforts. Turning next to China, Ford 
stressed the need to maintain strong relations 
with the Peking government. He hinted that 
any attempt to strengthen U.S. -Taiwanese re- 
lations at the exp>ense of the relations with the 
communist government would be a grave 
mistake. "As we look down the road, the US. 
has good relations with both governments. 
Future policy should be tailored to maintain 
this . . . We should take no action to support 
15 million people over one billion others." 
Ford also stated that "at some time it may 
become necessary to establish military rela- 
tions with the Peoples Republic." 

John Belk, in whose honor President Ford 
appeared, graduated from Davidson in 1943. 
As a student here, he was co-captain of the 
basketball team and Vice-President of the 
SGA. Now a trustee of the college and a mem- 
ber of the Wildcat Club, Belk was the recipi- 
ent of last year"s Distinguished Alumni 
Award. Mr. Belk is more recently known as 
the president of Belk Stores Services, Inc., a 
former chairman of the National Retail Mer 
chants Association, and for his eight year 
stint as mayor of Charlotte, the largest term 
in the city's history. 

-Donald Caldwell 



AS MAN OF THE DAY. John Belk was treated to a 
special dinner in his honor on May 4th Belk '43 is a 
former chairman of the Board of Trustees. 



DRILLED BY THE PRESS in the Colleges Guest House. 
President Ford answered questions about his recent trip 
abroad, which was also the topic of his speech in Love 

Auditorium. 



AS ONE PRESIDENT TO ANOTHER. Gerald Ford con 
fers with College President Samuel Spencer a moment 
before Ford's speech to the student body. 




Power Behind The Podium 



The Union Speakers' committee is orga 
nized to bring outside speakers to the cam 
pus, for talks and seminars. A variety of 
speakers and subjects is sought, and some- 
times a conjunction is arranged with other 
campus events, such as the inviting of Dr. 
King to speak by the Black Student Coalition 
(in this case it was the BSC who arranged for 
Dr. King to visit, and the Speakers' Commit- 
tee simply helped to fund his trip). Thus, 
through arranging a visit or just funding a 
prearranged speaker, the Speakers' Commit- 
tee usually plays an integral part in providing 
the campus with outside speakers. 

The first speaker of the year, who arrived 
on November 13th, was Victor Herman. Her 
man is the only person, from a total of three 
hundred American families sent to the Soviet 
Union in 1931 by the Ford Motor Co., to re- 
turn alive. And then only after forty-five 
years, of which eighteen were spent in con 
centration camps, and in exile in Eastern Sibe- 
ria. He is the author of two books on the 
experience. On the first day he spoke on "My 
Forty-five Years in the USSR " This was fol- 
lowed, on the 14th, by a reception and an 
informal question and answer session. The 



discussion centered mainly around his exper 
iences and his books. 

During the winter term. Ken Wooden ar 
rived with a very emotional and serious mes- 
sage on child abuse. The author of Keeping in 
the Playtime of Others and The Children of 
Jonestown, Ken Wooden is an investigative 
reporter who deals with the exploitation and 
abuse of children. In 1976 he founded the 
rSational Coalition for Childrens' Justice. 
Wooden began his visit to Davidson with a 
seminar on child abuse, and followed up with 
a talk on his latest book The Children of 
Jonestown, and a question and answer peri 
od. 

An extensive visit was planned for the next 
speaker, who gave several talks, as well as 
sitting in on classes and conducting numer 
ous seminars and discussion sessions, during 
the period April 12th to 16th. Dr. Joseph T. 
English was the 1981 Woodrow Wilson Visit 
ing Fellow. He is presently the director of 
Psychiatry at St. Vincent's Hospital and the 
Medical Center in New York City, as well as 
the Associate Dean of Mew York Medical Col- 
lege, and Director of the St. Vincent's Com- 
munity Health Care Center. Dr. English spoke 




STOPPING AT DAVIDSON WHILE ON A SERIES OF 
COLLEGE LECTURES. Sen. Birch Bayh addressed the 
student body on the tactics of the "New Right." Sherman 
Allen eats alongside Sen, Bayh at a dinner before the 
speech. 

FAR FROM OPTIMISTIC ON REAGAN'S SOCIOECO- 
NOMIC POLICIES, Dr Joseph T English lectured on the 
fate of the less than affluent people in America. 




on a wide range of topics, providing food for 
thought in various fields of interest. He began 
the week with 'The Future of Health Care in 
the U.S." and "Can the President be Protected 
Against Assassination?" He continued in the 
political field with talks on Reagan's policies 
and the poverty program, and ended on more 
general topics, such as "Can You Make a 
Living in the Liberal Arts?" and "Whatever 
Happened to the Peace Corps?" In addition to 
talks, seminars and discussions. Dr. English 
met with a foreign policy class, several psy 
chology and sociology classes, and spoke at a 
pre-med colloquium. Dr. English was well re- 
ceived, and his easy-going, informal attitude 
opened the floor for a lot of interaction and 
honest questioning, especially concerning 
government policies and students' career 
goals. 

Another of the year's more thought-pro 
vokng speakers was Dr. Charles King. Dr. 
King is the President of the CIrban Crisis Cen- 
ter in Atlanta, and served as Program Analyst 
for President Johnson's Commissions on Civil 
Disorders. He spoke at Davidson at the re 
quest of the Black Student Coalition. He be- 
gan his visit on April 20th with a talk on the 
"The Atlanta Children," followed by a racism- 
sensitivity seminar. Another seminar was 
held the following day, along with an informal 
discussion. His seminars were periods of high 
emotional intensity, as both faculty and stu- 
dents wrestled with the questions of racial 
oppression. Responses to Dr. King and his 
approach to the problems of racism were var- 
ied. Negative comments reflected a concern 
that his approach was too simplistic, too dog- 
matic; something that young people might 
adopt without thinking for themselves. Oth- 
ers felt that Dr. King was very effective; that 
by placing 'whites' in the position of being 
oppressed, as he did, he brought home to 
them for the first time the consequences and 
frustrations of oppression, and encouraged 
them to do something about the racism that 
persists in America to this day. 

Two weeks after Dr. King, Senator Birch 
Bayh arrived at Davidson. Senator Bayh was 
targeted for defeat by the Moral Majority, an 
attempt which succeeded in the 1980 elec 
tions. His last term of office expired on Janu- 
ary 4th, 1981. While in office, Bayh gained 
prominence as the Senate's leading propo- 
nent of constitutional rights and the develop- 
ment af alternative energy. He authored the 
twenty-fifth amendment which provided for 
Presidential succession in the case of death or 
disability, and the twenty-sixth amendment 
giving eighteen year olds the right to vote. He 
also proposed a constitutional amendment to 
secure direct popular election of the President 
and Vice-President, by abolishish the Elector- 



156 STUDENT LIFE 




EMOTIONS FLARED DURING RACISM SENSITIVITY 
SEMINARS conducted by Dr Charles King in the 900 
Room Dt King faced several stubborn attitudes, such as 
those held by student Hal Wahl 



al College. Senator Bayh's talk on April 27th 
focused on "The Recent Prominence of the 
'Mew Right' in American Politics," after which 
a press conference was held, informal ques 
tion and answer periods lasted throughout the 
next day. Much of the discussion with the 
senator revolved around the use of religious 
authority for political ends. The open atmo- 
sphere encouraged individual questioning, as 
well as frank answers and opinions from Sen- 
ator Bayh. 

A pleasant "surprise" guest speaker, who 
spoke just once on May 8th. was Dr. Sandor 
Kiss. Dr. Kiss lived under the regimes of both 
Hitler and Stalin. He was one of the spiritual 
and inspirational leaders of the attempted 
Hungarian Revolution of 1956. He is now a 



Foreign Service Officer for the Hungarian Ser 
vice on "The Voice of America." and serves 
as an editor and broadcaster for the service. 
Dr. Kiss' talk centered around his experiences 
in Hungary, and his personal ideology; a belief 
in the value of life-time sacrifice, justified by 
Christ-inspired hopes of redemption. He was 
very well-received, and the only regret was 
that his visit was so short. 

Chairmaned by Sherman Allen, the Speak- 
ers' Committee provided a wide variety of 
speakers and topics during the year. The op- 
portunity to informally discuss critical issues 
with experts is an invaluable privilege, and 
one of which more students should take ad- 
vantage. 

-Lisa Sloan. 




THE SENSITIVE ISSUE OF CHILD ABUSE, among othe 
topics was discussed by author Ken Wooden during win 
ter term Wooden wrote the revealing book. The Children 
of Jonestown. 




A LEADER OF THE 1956 HUNGARIAN REVOLUTION. 
Dr Sandor Kiss spoke on campus May 8th Aurie Hall 
and Kiss" daughter Elizabeth talk with Dr Kiss about his 
experience. 




158 STUDENT LIFE 






Amazons Rise From 
Basement 




In intramurals, Fall means one thing — 
Flickerball This year proved to have stronger 
teams than any previous year and resulted in 
some major upsets, the most noteworthy of 
which was the drubbing the KAs received 
from the SPEs in the tournament. The end 
result of the tournament was nothing out of 
the ordinary, however, as the SAEs captured 
the crown, led by team members Wheels and 
the brothers Evans. They defeated a tough 
senior team, "Hurtin' 4 Certain" (formerly 
2nd Watts) in the title game on Richardson 
Field. A special award was given to Eddie 
Haskell for his fine commentary during the 



UNDERHAND AND SOFT is how Rick Gaines pitches 
for batting practice and pregame warm-ups. 




game. In the women's league a freshman 
team, "The Formidables." dominated the 
whole league and concluded its season with a 
60 win over reigning champs, "Twice as 
Nice." It marked an unprecedented unbeaten, 
unscoredupon season for 4th Richardson. As- 
sistant coach Danny Waddill's hat was retired 
after the game to mark the event. 

In the winter basketball becomes IMAC's 
main concern, though gym space may make 
this a "sport of the past" in future years. 
Even so, the SAEs failed in their attempt to 
win the championship two years in a row by 
falling in three games to the Gifford Piercyled 
"Cool Breeze." The SAEs Bleague team, the 
"Sex Rays," also played for the title but lost a 
heartbreaker 58-56 to Basement Belk, better 
known as "Much Later." On the female scene 
there were no surprises as "Twice as Nice," 
led by Cathy Inabnet, breezed to its third con- 
secutive championship. 

Spring marks the emergence of Softball and 
volleyball. Softball provided some upsets as 
none of the preseason favorites, "Bone," 
"Eddie's Searchers, " 'Perpetual Perpetra- 
tors," or "Phi Delts" reached the final game. 
Instead, a group of SAEs. mostly sopho- 
mores, called the "Master Batters." met the 
geriatric squad ("Old Men") in a tooth and 
claw battle for the title. Finally, the "Old 
Men," who had come from behind to beat 
"Bone" the day earlier in 10 innings, suc- 
cumbed to exhaustion, and the fledgling E- 
baggers took the crown. 

However, the "Old Men " made a comeback 
in volleyball by defeating "Legerton's Losers" 
for their only title of the year. Led by "BIG 
Lou" Ortmayer, they avenged a regular sea- 
son loss to the "Losers" in a thrilling match. 
In the co-ed league, dark horse ""Mutton 
Jeffs" walked away with the honors. 

Oh, yeah, in women's softball, a huge team 
of Amazons from Basement Richardson 
slugged their way to an undefeated season 
under the personal supervision of the reigning 
Czar. Some attributed their success to hang- 
ing around the SAEs, but others felt that they 
won because everyone else forfeited out! 

The IMAC year ended on a sad note, as the 
Czar was brutally assassinated before 500 
sleeping Philosophy students. Therefore, next 
fall will bring the coronation of a new Czar. 
See you then! 

■John Butler 



DODGING THE RUSH of Dr Allan Singerman, John 
Haskell attempts to complete a pass in a flickerball 
game. 



Flickerball: The Only Passes At Davidson? 



What makes a flickerball player? Surpris 
ingly enough, the abilities to run and to throw 
a football do not have much to do with it, 
although they help. Joe Flickerball-player is 
not a jock, although he likes to think he is. All 
Joe needs is a pair of shorts, running shoes, 
sharp eyes, and a good imagination in order to 
become the Davidson fall hero, the Flickerball 
Star. Jane Flickerball-player is much the 
same case, except that she generally doesn't 
even try to think she's a jock (with, of course, 
some notable exceptions . . . and they won 
the championship). 

The flickerball season was a good one and 
involved lots of fun for all the teams. Fresh- 
man teams made a particularly good show- 
ing, with a group of freshmen, the Formida- 
bles of 4th Richardson, winning the women's 
championship, and two men's teams, the 
Bushwhackers of 2nd East, and Coming East 
from 3rd East, making it into double elimina- 
tion in the men's tournament. In one of the 
more surprising games of the season, the 
SPEs beat the KAs for the first time since 
1932. 

In a game which surprised few people, the 
SAEs won the men's tournament 53-18 
against Hurtin' 4 Certain, a group from sever 
al different fraternities which has been play- 
ing together since their freshman year. Appar 



ently someone high up in IMAC foresaw the 
eventual SAE victory, because their games 
were played on Field #1 all season long. 
Some key players for the SAE were Kevin 
Wheelock, "Mr. Defense" Chris Daniels, the 
Evans brothers Alex and David, and Joby 
Merten. 

Wearing their ever-present bandanas, the 
Formidables defeated the defending champs, 
the Rowdies, 19-0 to win the women's tourna- 
ment. A group of seniors, the Rowdies, had 
been flickerball champions for the past three 



years. The Formidables had a truly outstand- 
ing record — no team was able to score 
against them all season. Their stars included 
Monica Gorham. Mary Legerton, and Marga- 
ret Ervin. "We felt like the whole time we had 
a good thing going." said Formidable Frances 
Palmer. "We had some outstanding players, 
but mostly we worked well together as a 
team." 

-Caroline Boudreau 







160 STUDENT LIFE 




I « 



FINDING HIMSELF IN TROUBLE. Johnny 
Old Men hustles to avoid being tagged. 



t 1 



>RMIDABLES' TAILBACK ANDREA GEYER looks for TAILBACK J.C. FAOLKNER LOOKS DOWNFIELD for a 
tjass as Mary Fant covers the backfieid. receiver while John (Eddie) Haskell prepares to block. 




162 STtlDENT LIFE 




I -(G THEIR PART DURIMG 
CHRISTMAS FESTIVITIES are 
carolers Todd Cowdery. Frank 
Myers, and Steve Gray 



SAMTA HAS A LAPFOL with 
freshmen Sally Hughes and Sharon 
Bryant. 




Christmas, A 

Respite 

From The Books. 



CHIP HORLEY DECORATES THE 
CHRISTMAS TREE that stands in 
front of the E.H. Little Library each 
year. 



THE CAMPaS/COMMONITY 
CHRISTMAS PARTY was a family 
affair with Jamie Hall and his son 
Jamie. Jr. 



The Christmas season at 
Davidson officially begins on 
the day everyone returns 
from Thanksgiving vaca- 
tion. During the first week 
back there was a party 
around campus every night, 
and the pace did not ease up 
the entire three weeks be- 
fore Christmas vacation. 
The campus took on a fes- 
tive air with decorations in 
all of the buildings. In the 
dorms — most notably in 
the freshman dorms — 
many halls were creatively 
decorated, with doors 
wrapped in various wrap- 
ping papers, and with Christ- 
mas wreathes scattered here 
and there. 

Having Christmas trees in 
the dorms was especially 
challenging, since it is dis- 
couraged by the College be- 
cause the trees are consid- 
ered a fire hazard. Students, 

MARGARET KARIS PORTRAYS 
ATH ELF while she inconspicuously 
places herself under mistletoe. 




however, were willing to 
take the risk and continue 
an age-old tradition. 

Several campus organiza- 
tions went caroling in the 
community, and the cam- 
pus and community got to- 
gether for the annual Christ- 
mas Party held in the Gnion. 
Elves (Union workers in dis- 
guise) were seen walking 
around that night of De- 
cember 11. The party of- 
fered good food, a giant tree, 
Santa Claus holding large 
and small children on his 
knees, Christmas specials 
on the Big Screen TV, and 
Dr. Rhodes narrating a not- 
so-traditional Christmas sto- 
ry- 
Christmas Vespers took 
place in the College Church 
on December 14, featuring a 
sermon by Dr. McKelway 
and music by the men's and 
women's choruses. The 
crowd, as always, filled the 
church and created a stand- 
ing-room-only situation. 

Most organizations joined 
in the Christmas celebration 
with their own parties. The 
traditional gift-exchanging 
took place all over campus, 
and Secret Santas left their 
traces in the dorms. The 
yearbook staff sponsored a 
cookie sale which allowed 
students to send Christmas 
cookies to their favorite 
friends. A fund-raising drive 
for the Davidson in Kenya 
program was held during the 
week before Christmas 
break, and students, faculty, 
and administration officials 
donated generously to the 
cause. In all, Christmas was 
a time to let books and prob- 
lems take a back seat and to 
get into the spirit of the holi- 
day. 

-Caroline Boudreau 



rDorm Life — 'A Stairway To Heaven'- 



Can you imagine how boring college would 
be without dorm life? Our lives are so 
"moved" by those loud stereos, rowdy neigh 
bors, jam sessions, drunken brawls, and foot- 
ball matches or any other unexpected behav- 
ior that can take place on any given day or 
night in Davidson's dormitories. There are 
seven dorms on campus in which students 
can life, and each has its own unique — if not 
renowned — reputation. 

Freshmen men and women live in Richard- 
son and Belk, respectively. (Jpperclassmen 
can live in Belk also, but only on the fourth 
floor; and upperclasswomen can live on base- 
ment Richardson. Both of these halls are 
noted for their low profile, which stands in 
sharp contrast with the profile of the upper- 
classmen dorm Duke. 

Everyone knows about Duke. It has a char- 
acter all to itself, one which is sometimes 
referred to as "freaky". No one can predict 
what will be thrown or released next from one 
of those infamous patio parties. And who 
could ever forget the night "Stairway to Heav- 
en" was played repeatedly 79 times, prevent- 
ing every inhabitant of the dorm from doing 
anything that slightly resembled sleep? 

Moving down "dormitory row" one then 
finds all-male Sentelle, all-female Cannon, all- 
male Watts, and coed Little dorms. These 
dorms are distinguishable from the others by 
their residents, but a common bond shared by 
them is a phenomenon called "hall parties". 
Occurrences such as these are characterized 
by a couple of dozen guys and a couple of 
girls lined up against the wall, with a keg of 
beer at the end of the hall surrounded by 
dumb jocks who eventually become very de 
structive. Although this description fits most 
hall parties, there are notable exceptions. For 
instance, fourth Sentelle had a Zombie Party 
fall term at which many once-respectable stu- 
dents lost nearly all of their inhibitions and 



were transformed overnight into genuine hell- 
raisers. 

Surprisingly, Davidson's dorms remain in 
fairly good condition; however, traces of de- 
struction and deterioration do exist. Several 
flammable wooden articles are mysteriously 
missing from many rooms in Sentelle, and 
several wooden chairs have been replaced by 
plastic patio chairs. Perhaps the greatest evi- 
dence of deterioration can be found in base 
ment Cannon, where in at least one room the 
ceiling is slowly but surely disintegrating. The 
residents of this particular room, who asked 
to remain unidentified, wake up in the middle 
of every night to the tune of dropping plaster. 
Said one of the assaulted residents: "It's won- 
derful to wake up in the morning totally cov- 
ered in plaster. The night a big chunk falls on 
my head is going to be the end of me." 

Certainly a major cause of this problem is 
the playing of rowdy music which causes one 
to think he/she is living directly over an earth- 
quake fault. This experience is lived regularly 
by a pair of sophomores (whom I will refer to 
as Pair A) who live next door to another pair 
(Pair B) who own what could possibly be 
termed as the "Speakers of the South". When 
Pair B cranks up those speakers. Pair A 
swears the furniture in their room vibrates so 
much that it has actually moved across the 
room. Just picture what such vibration does 
to plaster in ceilings and walls! 

Somehow, though, I don't think this par- 
ticular case is isolated, for on beautiful spring 
days when the dorms are abandoned for the 
sunny outdoors, one can hear some of the 
loudest, rowdiest music this side of the Appa- 
lachians. This fine music blasts out of nearly 
every other window, so 1 am led to believe 
that there is a wealth of deaf students on the 
Davidson College campus. 

One might ask if it is possible to study in 
the dorms. Yes, it is possible in the early. 




early morning, and occasionally on Sunday 
night. Otherwise, it is possible if you thrive on 
noise and interruptions. By interruptions I re 
fer to the visiting habits of hallmates and 
others. Certain rooms are perfectly conducive 
to drawing people in to visit. One of the most 
popular features a room can have is a wa- 
terbed. Nice looking lofts, too, are always a 
popular item, but their greatest advantage is 
the saving of room space, which in turn gives 
accommodation to more visitors. Obviously, 
a good stereo system and album or tape col- 
lection are essentials in making friends and 
being popular. A combination of all of the 
above room features always makes for the 
busiest room on any hall. 

With the opening of two new dorms on 
campus next year, however, a new era in 
Davidson dorm life will begin. These two 
dorms will surely build names for themselves 
and probably draw some of the most reputa- 
ble characters from existing dorms, but they 
will not be the same without the Davidson 
standards of people living in lounges, pipes 
banging in the middle of the night, and the 
lack of hot water in the showers in the dead of 
winter. No matter what transformations oc- 
cur, though, rest assured that dorm life will 
flourish as long as Davidson exists. 

■Jim Reese 




DORMS ARE NOT JOST FOR LIVING IN! Window sills, 
balconies, ledges, rooftops, and patios seem to equal to 
dorm rooms as popular places to have wild parties. 

A BASEMENT RICHARDSON CRUSH PARTY means a 
crushing experience for Terry Kurt2. Vickie Neale. Chip 
Christian. Jane Alexanian. David Carr, Kathy Kooken. 
Andy Engh. and Jean Soracco. 



164 STUDEMT LIFE 



.■s'S»i3S?SR3&**^- 



The P.O. 
Trek 



In wonder if I got anything. What's today? Thursday? Well, 
Newsweek's out . . . Time won't get here until late next week 
. . . Sports Illustrated isn't due for a while, either. Maybe my 
free pen came. 

"Hi, Jim." 

/ hear Herpetological Review comes on Thursdays. Maybe I 
could subscribe . . . 

"Hey, Mary." 

Wait. The Sears catalogue should be coming out. Maybe it's 
here today. I bet it is . . . Sure it is. Oh boy. 

"What's up, Todd?" 

Great — / love the Sears catalogue. They always stick a 
mimeographed letter up front that starts, 'Dear Customer 
. . .". Nothing like personal mail. 

"Hey, Lisa." 

CF121Why do all these people crowd up here? If this guy 
backs into me once more I'm gonna get perturbed. There's my 
box, I'll just casually struggle over, reach in, and whip out my 
extraordinary load of mail to everybody's amazement. 

"Hi, Mike." 

Maybe I'll look in the little window to see if I'm going to need 
both hands free to carry it all back. I'll just lean down here — 
oh no. 

"Arrrrrrgh!" 

Airmail. Why do I do this? I should just sub-lease this post- 
box and forget it. Look, even he got mail; first time in months, 
and what do I get? FRUSTRATION! 

But tomorrow's Friday, and that means, at this very instant. 
Better Homes and Gardens is on the way. I'll have something 
tomorrow for sure. «,™«. 



SOME THINGS NEVER CHANGE. Since no classes are held during the 10 
o'clock hour at Davidson, multitudes of students flock to the post office in 
anticipation of getting some mail and of s 

ings at 10 o'clock, one can find such scenes as students reading their mail 
while walking, campus dogs waiting at the crosswalk, Cambria Melton execut- 
ing her combination, Grier Harris peeking through his box, and students 
stopping to socialize in the P.O. 



mfff'^"-^t[T>^i 



\ ■in'^l^;rJ'Ji 





166 STUDENT LIFE 



THE MEDIA PLAYED AN IMPORTAMT ROLE in this ANDERSON SUPPORTERS, Rob lies. Dave Hessler. and 
year's election. Freshman Lentz ivey watches President Bob Hopkins show their enthusiasm at a preelection 
Carter on a crucial night before election day. party at the Kappa Alpha house. 



'80 Election 
... Ho Hum 

"Moderate" seems to be the most adequate 
word to describe the atmosphere and atti- 
tudes at Davidson this election year. There 
was a moderate amount of interest in the 
November 4 election; neither the apathy of 
past years nor the rampant political aware- 
ness of the sixties prevailed. Dinner conversa- 
tions were just as apt to revolve around the 
elections as exam schedules and Thanl<sgiv- 
ing plans. Students seemed to be aware of the 
issues but few cared to verbalize their views. 

A Forum on the election held in the Gallery 
and a poll taken by Dr. Mary Thornberry's fall 
term political science classes reflected the 
lukewarm attitude of Davidson students. Less 
than one hundred and fifty people attended 
the forum which was designed to inform peo- 
ple of the presidential candidates' views. Re- 
presented at the forum were supporters of 
Independent John Anderson, Democrat Jim- 
my Carter, Libertarian Ed Clark, and Republi- 
can Ronald Reagan. 

The poll taken by Dr. Thornberry's class 
revealed that most students were aware of 
the issues and had opinions on them, but that 
they were not actively involved in the elec- 
tion. Forty-three percent of students polled 
were moderately interested in the '80 presi- 
dential campaign, forty percent very interest- 
ed, sixteen percent slightly interested, and 
two percent not interested. Most students 
were registered and did plan to vote. 

In the local race for U.S. Congress, the two 
major political rivals were affiliated with Da- 
vidson College. Randy Kincaid, an economics 
professor, and incumbent Jim Martin, a for- 
mer chemistry professor, battled for a N.C. 
seat to which Martin was elected. 

Ronald Reagan was elected president, the 
Republicans, prevailed nationwide, but the 
"Politicing" is not over. Speculation for 1982 
and 1984 has already begun as well as active 
campaign preparations. The conservative tide 
that swept the nation in 1980 was reflected at 
Davidson, and it will be interesting to note 
how this popularized way of thinking will af- 
fect the nation. 

-Katie Tully 




FHIS RANDY KINCAID SUPPORTER cunpaigni in Ij 
vidson for the on leave economics professor. 




a 



Rain, Rain, Go Away 



J9 



And It Did!!! 




We tried. We tried so hard. 

When the yearbook was in 
its planning stages, a few bright 
and talented staff members 
came up with an outstanding 
idea for a feature spread that 
would truly represent Davidson 
College: A Rainy Winter. Every- 
one knows that all it does is 
rain during winter term at Da- 
vidson. What do you think is 
the major contributing factor in 
the annual "Winter Blues"? 
The smart yearbookers smiled 
contentedly at one another. If 
10 o'clock meant mail, then 
winter meant rain. 

Wrong. In the seven weeks 
between Christmas and Spring 
Breaks it rained only twice. 
That's right, two lousy times. 
Who would have guessed that 
Davidson was going to choose 
this winter to do its dust bowl 
imitation. And the lack of rain 
wasn't limited to D.C.; drought 
hit many parts of the country, 
even causing water rationing in 
New York. Naturally, the year- 
book staff was in a state of 
shock. Even the DCF staff 
members couldn't get the de 
sired results. 



Reluctantly, the Q & C pho- 
tographers removed their slick- 
ers and duck shoes. "Why, why 
me?" cried the editor unto the 
clear skies above her. Another 
brilliant idea bit the dust. "Ah, 
but wait!" exclaimed a small 
voice. "Why not do a spread on 
the . . . the . . . sunshine?!" 
The staff fell to their knees and 
thanked their lucky stars for 
small voices. (Well, what do 
you want from a group that 
only gets it once a year?) 

So here it is. Other than the 
two euphoric inches of snow 
which fell on the last Friday in 
January, the winter term 
weather was heavenly. Sweat- 
ers and light jackets were the 
usual attire, with several glori- 
ous days requiring T-shirts and 
shorts. Students took full ad- 
vantage of the wild winter 
weather by studying outdoors, 
sunbathing, playing frisbee, 
and generally pretending to be 
at ole Miami (J. As for the year- 
bookers, they were elated to fi- 
nally be on top of a breaking 
story. 

-Chris Gunn 



WARMTH. SUN. AND BRICKS ARE 
BEST. Robin Kidd finds an ideal place 
to study on the outside of E.H. Little 
Library. 



NOT HAVING ANY FOOD doesn't 
stop freshman Jeb Benedict from using 
the patio lounge adjacent to the Snack 
Bar to read his mall. 



SNOW HIT DAVIDSON MORE THAN 
ONCE, but actually this insulation 
"snow" was a popular prank prop even 
on the warmest winter days 




ON FEBRUARY 7th, ONLY ONE 
WEEK AFTER DAVIDSONS SNOW- 
FALL, sunbathers camped out on 
lawns, walkways, and even dorm balco- 
nies. 








FROM ALL OVER THE WORLD, it would appear, par 
ents come to visit their children. In this case. Deepak 
Sawhneys parents had to come only from Belmont. 
North Carolina, for Parent's Weekend. 

A BREAK IN THE WEATHER and the shade of a large 
tree give Mr and Mrs James Rozzelle. Rick Graves, and 
his parents a chance to talk after the football game 




Visitors Of A Kindred Spirit 



Vacuum cleaners roared and the debris of 
the past two months was deposited in "demp 
sey dumpsters" as 450 parents descended on 
campus for Parent's Weekend, October 31- 
November 2. The weekend, coordinated by 
Will Terry and a committee of students, was 
packed with events: enough to make even the 
most homesick freshman forget how much he 
missed dear old Mom and Dad and the most 
grade conscious parents overlook some 
grades that weren't up to par. Parents regis 
tered on Friday and were invited to attend 
sessions on special programs at Davidson, 
such as the experlental program, the Center 



for Special Studies, and the preprofessional 
counseling program. That night, students and 
parents were invited to open houses held by 
members of the various departments. There 
was also a dinner and a production of "Look 
Homeward Angel" to keep visiting parents 
busy. 

Saturday, parents had options open to 
them: convocation in the morning, a barbecue 
given by the cheerleaders on the football prac- 
tice field, football and soccer games that 
afternoon, and a campus wide reception after 
the games. At the reception, each eating 
house had its own booth which served food 



and drink to parents. That night there was a 
Greek dinner, a repeat of the Talent Show. 
"Top Hats and Cat Tails." and the Jazz En- 
semble played in the 900 Room. 

Many parents attended Sunday morning 
worship services and left as mutual sighs of 
exhaustion and relief rose over campus. 

Katie Tully 



REMAINING IN HIS UNIFORM, freshman soccer player 
Stephen Giles greets his parents alter the Saturday morn- 
ing soccer game 




FACOLTY MEMBERS AS WELL AS PARENTS enjoyed 
the events of Parent s Weekend. French professor Gather 
ine Sutton and sophomore Sissy McCamy relax and chat 

at Safjrday s reception. 

THE INCREDIBLE EXCITEMENT OF PARENTS 
WEEKEND doesn t seem to phase junior Alec Driskell as 
he has lunch with his parents. 






i*»>«'!'S^°'''' 







: Do You Plan Jo Remain As President Of Davidson College Indefinitely? 

Sam Spencer: No. 



Q S C: When you were at Davidson 
during your undergraduate years, you 
were the President of the Student Body. 
Dr. Spencer: Yes . . . 
Q & C: It is my impression that often 
today, the Student Senate and the Stu- 
dent Body President get frustrated be- 
cause of all the red tape they have to go 
through in the process of instigating 
change, and they feel bound because, at 
times, they suspect that the administra- 
tion is not giving them the full story on 
issues. 

Dr. Spencer: I haven't been aware of 
that kind of tension with the Presidents 
of the Student Body with whom I've 
worked. 

Q & C: You've never felt this tension? 
. Well, I'm sure this observation 
stems from my personal involvement in 
the Senate. What I'm leading up to is 
this: Did you ever feel that as Student 
Body President your hands were tied 
and that the administration was keeping 
you from achieving goals that you want- 
ed to achieve?. 

Dr. Spencer: Well, we were dealing with 
questions that would probably seem 
odd to students today, and also, we 
were dealing more with internal prob- 
lems that were of interest to students 
... for instance, one of the big issues in 
my day was the issue of a cut system. 
In the days when students had to go, not 
only to class, but to chapel and church, 
there was an elaborate system of ab- 
sences: students got a certain number 
of absences from class, and a certain 
number of absences from chapel, and a 
certain number of absences from ves- 
pers. One of the key internal issues was 
pushing to get more absences from 
these programs; an issue like this, for 
instance, would seem very odd to stu- 
dents today. Sure, we always felt that 
the administration was being, well, I'm 
not quite sure how to characterize it . . . 
that they weren't seeing the students' 
point of view, and so on. 



Q & C: How does it feel to be on the 
other side of the fence now that you are 
the administration? Do you keep all 
your past experiences in mind as you 
deal with students today? 
Dr. Spencer: Sure, I think anybody 
who's been through it and watched the 
development of the College over a long 
period of time would have that feeling 
and understanding of the students' feel- 
ings. For one thing, there is always an 
impatience on the part of the student 
and particularly student leaders be- 
cause they are here only four years and 
probably influential only about two 
years. Consequently, there's a great 
feeling of: "If we don't get this done 
before we get out of here, it'll never get 
done." That kind of impatience is easy 
to understand, and I think anybody 
who's dealt with it a long time would 
also have a perspective in realizing that 
the college moves on and that it isn't 
really true that unless something hap- 
pens in the next year, things won't get 
done. 

a & C: Do you feel that the Trustees 
use the fact that students are only here 
for four years as a means to curb stu- 
dent rebellion and attempt at change? 
Dr. Spencer: No, I don't thing there's 
any conscious attitude on the part of 
the Trustees, or the Administration ei- 
ther. There's an understanding of it but 
certainly not a feeling of "we can put 
them off because they'll be gone." All 
you have to do is go back and look at 
the record and see that many changes 
have taken place over the years and 
realize that the changes do come in 
many cases. 

One other thing — you have to recog- 
nize that both the Trustees and the Ad- 
ministration are dealing with multiple 
constituencies at a college. In other 
words, you're not dealing with just stu- 
dents, but you're dealing with faculty, 

WITH CUSTOMARY ANIMATION. Dr. Spencer 
emphasizes a point to interviewer Diane Odom. 




with administrative staff, with alumni, 
with the Church, and with parents — all 
of whom are legitimate elements in the 
overall constituency. So you have to be 
conscious of these other constituencies, 
it's very easy for students to think of 
themselves as the only constituency; 
it's easy for the faculty to think of itself 
as the only constituency. And thats un- 
derstandable: we're all made that way; 
we all see things from our own perspec- 
tive. 

Q & C: How is it that you are able to pull 
all these separate groups together and 
form one policy? 

Dr. Spencer: Well, first of all by keeping 
in mind that you do have all these peo- 
ple to deal with . . . they'll let you know 
that! 

Q & C: Is there any one group that has 
more pull than another? 
Dr. Spencer: Not that I can name. No. 
The Trustees themselves, of course, as 
the decision-making body of the Col- 
lege, have the responsibility of setting 
the policies. One of the ways — you 
were asking how one keeps something 
of a balance — one of the ways the 
Trustees do this is by functioning com- 
mittees which deal with various aspects 
of college life. These committees do 
. function — they are not the letter-head 
or rubber-stamp type. 
Q & C: Cinder your presidency, the fra- 
ternity system was changed from the 
bid system to a "self-selection" system. 
How can you justify this change when 
you, yourself, participated in the bid fra- 
ternity system? 

Dr. Spencen Well, I think you could 
answer that by saying that I was prob- 
ably in a better position to justify it than 
if I hadn't been in a fraternity system. 
Q & C: Did you have problems with this 
system when you were a student? 
Dr. Spencer: Yes, even as a student I 
saw the hurt that some students under- 
went because they didn't get into frater- 
nities. And then later as Dean of Stu- 
dents, it was quite apparent to me also. 
We had a situation where 85% of a 
freshman class would be pledging fra- 
ternities. The other 15% who had been 
selected to come to college here ar>d 
had been told when they were admitted 
that they were "First Class," suddenly 
found themselves branded as "Second 
Class," socially, because they didn't get 
in. Now some of them genuinely didn't 
want to be members, but certainly some 
of them were really scarred by the rejec- 
tion they got at first — and they got it 
early in the game too! They were told 
that they were not acceptable to the 
fraternities. One of the real problems 
was that, to the extent that that was 
true, if it were true at all, these students 
would have been the ones who most 




AT HOME OR AT WORK? The President handles 
the intrusion into his home by Quipi & Cranks 
staff members with his customary affability. 

needed the kind of social acceptance 
and social training that the fraternities 
proported to give. And so it was a sys- 
tem which gave a lot of pleasure and 
had a lot of virtures for the people in it, 
and gave a lot of hurt to those who 
weren't in it. 

There was another factor by the time 
the change was made and that is that 
the fraternities, themselves, were not in 
very good shape. There seemed to be a 
great erosion during the senior year, and 
the fraternities became more or less 
freshman and sophomore groups. Also, 
four student body presidents up until 
the time the change was made had cam- 
paigned and been elected on the 
strength of doing something about the 
fraternity system. So, while it was cer- 
tainly something I supported, and I 
guess you could say instigated, it was 
not without substantial support on the 
campus. 

Incidently, to the argument of the 
hurt of other people, you get a counter- 
argument that: "OK, but that's how life 
is ..." The only thing is, I never heard 
anybody who was not in a fraternity use 
that argument; it was always the people 
who had been accepted into a fraternity 
that used that argument. It doesn't 
seem to stand up. 

Q & C: In all your years Davidson Col- 
lege, as a student, as a faculty member, 
and now as President, what do you feel 
has been your most significant contribu- 
tion to the school? 

Dr. Spencer: I think the most significant 
change, by far, has been co-education, 
and it's the best thing that Davidson 
could have done during my time here. 
Q & C: Think of the private Sam Spen- 
cer. What are your ambitions and 
dreams? 

Dr. Spencer: Do you mean "What am I 
going to be when I grow up?" 




SERVICE WITH A SMILE: Sam Spencer enjoys a 
rare moment away from the immediate responsi- 
bilities of the College. 

Q & C: Yes. Do you plan to remain as 
President of Davidson College indermlte- 
ly? 

Dr. Spencer: No. 

Q & C: Then what are you planning to 
do after you have accomplished all you 
want to accomplish at Davidson Col- 
lege? 

Dr. Spencer: That's something that Is 
very definately on my mind, and frank- 
ly, I have not made up my mind as to 
what I would like to do. I will not retire 
and watch TV. Whatever I do, I want It 
to be productive. I've thought of a num- 
ber of things, some of which are prob- 
ably not very practical — like going to 
law school, for example. I don't think 
that at this point, this would be possible, 
but I've envied people in professions 
like law and medicine who can continue 
to be productive and scale down as they 
go along. Whatever I do, I would like to 
be in a job that, first of all, I think Is 
constructive, and secondly which has 
nothing to do with decisions affecting 
other people's lives. That's the weakest 
part of my job today, so I'd rather be In 
something that does not Include making 
decisions that will affect the lives of 
others. 




"DO YOU MEAN 'WHAT AM I GOING TO BE 
WHEN I GROW UP*? Dr. Spencer laughingly con- 

' ' rs his "life after Davidson". 

The substance of this article was taken 
from a series of interviews between Dr. 
Spencer and Quips and Cranks editor 
Diane Odom. in January. The tape in- 
terviews were transcribed by Dale 
Withrow. 



Deans Set Superb 
Examples 




DEAN ZIMMERMAN keeps the academic affairs running 
smoothly. 



Davidson boasts of four academic deans: 
Price Zimnnerman, Dean of Faculty; Nick Bur- 
nett, Associate Dean of Faculty; Will Terry, 
Dean of Students; and Sue Ross, Associate 
Dean of Students. Although their positions 
interrelate some, each is very important and 
necessary to both the student body and the 
faculty. In this light, let us take a closer look 
at our academic deans. 

Price Zimmerman, Dean of Faculty and 
Academic Vice President of the college, has a 
particularly obscure job to students. General- 
ly his job is to hire creative leadership for the 
educational enterprise, to maintain its quality 
at all times, and to seek its continuing im- 
provement. Specifically, this entails review- 
ing the faculty for new appointments, promo- 
tion, and tenure, participating on the Curricu- 
lum Requirement Committee and conferring 
with faculty as chairman of its Committee on 
Educational Policy about the general direc- 
tion of the college's academic program. All of 
the academic department chairmen, the Di- 
rector of the Library, the Dean of the Center 
for Special Studies, the Director of the Com- 
puter Center, and the Registrar report to Dr. 
Zimmerman, who in turn reports to President 
Spencer. Audiovisual services, international 
studies, and extended studies are also over- 
seen by Dean Zimmerman. Though his inter- 
action with students is brief. Dean Zimmer- 
man is intricately involved in all the academic 
and administrative areas that affect students. 

Because the combined responsibilities of 
being Academic Vice President and Dean of 
Faculty are very demanding, an additional 
position was added to the Faculty this year 
resulting in the appointment of Dr. Nick Bur- 
nett as Associate Dean of Faculty. One of the 
areas in which Dr. Burnett has already been 
active is "instrumentation in the sciences"; 
he has developed inventories of resources, 
planned for present and future needs, and 
developed grant proposals to meet these 
needs. A new responsibility for Dr. Burnett is 
in the area of faculty searches. He acts as a 
Mason for department chairmen in faculty 
searches. He worked with the Biology Depart- 
ment in particular this year as a new depart- 
ment chairman was needed. Other responsi- 
bilities include assisting Dean Zimmerman in 
budget processing, academic planning, grant 
applications and funding proposals for the 
new Computer Center. Thus these two deans 
work essentially hand in hand to take care of 
faculty and academic needs. 

The remaining two deans also work hand in 
hand to deal with the students' needs. Will 
Terry, as Dean of Students, deals with stu 




DEAN BaRNETT enjoys handing out well-earned student 
honors 

dents both on an individual and corporate 
level. A large part of his job consists of coordi- 
nating the judicial and guidance departments 
of the college. He is the head advisor to the 
Student Judicial System, and thus very in- 
volved with the processes of our Honor Sys- 
tem. As Chairman of the Campus and Reli- 
gious Life Advisory Council, he is responsible 
for various religious programs on campus and 
is now particularly involved in the search 



178 PEOPLE 




DAVIDSONS DEANS OFFICE is by far the most for 
mal place on campus 




DEAN ROSS always manages to keep the students 
rale up and up and up 



committee for a new Chaplain. He is also 
Chairman of the Counseling and Guidance 
Committee, and he works closely with the 
psychologists at Davidson as well as making 
himself available for individual counseling for 
students. In addition to dealing with students' 
mental and spiritual needs, Dean Terry looks 
after our physical needs, too. He is ultimately 
responsible for the Infirmary and the Housing 
Office and is frequently consulted on large 
matters that come into these offices. [Seed- 
less to say. Will Terry's list of responsibilities 
is quite extensive. This is why Davidson stu- 
dents need Sue Ross, Associate Dean of Stu- 
dents. 

Sue's position focuses on working with stu- 
dents individually, dealing with questions and 
problems, assisting in career choices, and 
starting new organizations. "Because Will is 
tied up administratively, my job tends to give 
me more time to work with students," Sue 
says. But in addition to working with students 
on a day-to-day basis. Sue Ross also takes a 
lot of Will's committee work to enable him to 
also spend more time with students. She is a 
member of the Union Board, the Policy Com- 
mittee, Chairman of the Council on Women's 
Concerns, and is very active in the Women's 
Center. Although the two Deans don't divide 
men and women for counseling. Sue often 
tends to see the majority of the women who 




WHAT IS IT about Dean Terry that makes him such a good influence? 



come in with special problems. Both Sue and 
Will are especially excited about the im- 
proved freshman program and about working 
closer with the hall counselors. 

Thus, every aspect of a student's life at 
Davidson can be linked in one way or another 
to these four professionals. Our immediate 
mental, physical, and spiritual needs are met 
through Deans Terry and Ross. Provisions for 



our academic needs are met through Deans 
Zimmerman and Burnett. Dean Zimmerman 
and Dean Burnett are also responsible for the 
career needs of the individual faculty mem- 
bers. The position of Dean is truly one of great 
responsibility and is very demanding. An aw- 
ful lot of love and dedication to Davidson 
students and Davidson College is necessary 
to be a Davidson Dean. .^53 gloan 



Administration 179 




JOHN V. GRIFFITH. 



Admissions Team Looks Ahead 





Davidson's Special Angels 



Chambermaids? Oh, yeah; those are the 
women that sweep the halls in Chambers, 
right? Wrong. 

Written when the organization was formed 
seven years ago, their statement of purpose 
reads: "The purpose of the Chambermaids 
shall be to support students, faculty, and ad- 
ministration of Davidson College, to encour- 
age in a considerate and professional manner 
the full potential development of its mem- 
bers, to foster fellowship, and to establish an 

CHAMBERMAID ELEANOR NORTHCOTT (Registrar s 
office) establisfies a line of communication between tfie 
students and tfie College witfi hier genuine warmth. 



official line of communication between its 
members and the College in order to promote 
greater understanding and cooperation." The 
organization was started so that ail the secre- 
taries could get together as a group because, 
according to vice-president Debbie Hoover, it 
is difficult to see and to get to know other 
secretaries that are on other floors or in other 
buildings. 

After collecting annual membership dues in 
January, the new officers took control and 
began a new year. The secretaries meet one 
Tuesday night each month for fellowship and 
a program. The programs are helpful, practi- 



180 PEOPLE 



You know the story — you send in your 
application and twenty dollars; and you will 
receive forms, forms, and more forms: a Sec 
ondary Scfiool Report form, a Personal State 
ment form, and no less tfian four Recommen 
dation forms, not to mention scholarship 
forms and financial aid forms. And then if 
you're lucky, the Admissions Office will send 
you (some long awaited) good news on April 
15. But, alas, this too is a form letter. Don't let 
this impersonal image fool you, however. Be- 
hind that facade of standardized forms, non 
refundable fees, and final deadlines, Davidson 
has some real "down home" folks: the Admis 
sions Staff. 

The Admissions Counseling and Financial 
Aid staff is headed by Director John Griffith 
and Associate Directors Gardner Roller and 
Kathleen Stevenson. Working with these 
counselors are two recent Davidson gradu 
ates. Counselors John Stroud and Sandy Mar- 
tin. Since Davidson places great emphasis on 
personal interviews, these jobs are of the ut- 
most importance, it takes people with diverse 
tastes and interests, and a genuine concern 
for the student to execute a successful inter- 
view. Their approach, as John Stroud points 
out, is to "challenge the prospective students 
and to make them feel good about themselves 
by focusing on areas with which they feel 
most comfortable." Stroud says that the Ad- 
missions Staff has no set of prescribed ques 
tions with which to bombard and trick the 
prospective student. Instead, counselors just 
"wing it " in the interview, letting the student 
set the format and tone. 

Interviews keep the staff busy, especially 
during the fall months. In fact, this year the 
Admissions Office interviewed two hundred 
and ninety-eight individuals and two groups in 
October alone. When they are out of the of- 
fice on recruiting trips, scheduling can get 
very hectic and the "reserve troops" must be 

THE ADVANTAGES OF BEING AN ADMISSIONS 
COUNCELOR: Johnnie Stroud takes a group of cute high 
school seniors on a tour 



called in. Two such '"emergency" counselors 
are Ginger Evans and Dr. Richard Burts who 
enable Davidson to handle efficiently almost 
any load. 

Director John Griffith is new to his job as 
overseer of the Admissions Office, but his 
varied interests and impressive background, 
coupled with his contagious energy and en 
thusiasm, guarantee positive growth for Da 
vidson. 

Already he has revitalized Student Admis 
sions Teams and has pioneered an experien 
tial Davidson Alumni Program geared toward 
more active and direct involvement by alumni 
in the recruitment of prospective students. 
This program, referred to as DAP, is running 
smoothly in Columbia, South Carolina and is 
expected to extend to other cities by this 
summer. Another idea, instituted since Mr. 
Griffiths arrival, is the inclusion of a "peer 
recommendation" with a student's applica- 
tion. According to Mr. Griffith, "it is really 
paying off." A letter from a prospectives peer 
is refreshing and insightful and "makes the 
application come alive." Mr. Griffith hopes to 
continue these programs and "to direct more 
attention in the future to issues concerning 
minorities and women on campus." He is also 
preparing for changes that are inevitable due 
to a decrease in the number of collegeaged 
students coupled with an increase in the costs 
of transportation, publishing, and postage. 

In addition to the Admissions Counselors, 
the Admissions Office employs two reception- 
ists, two staff secretaries, and a stenographer. 
Secretaries Flora Ramsey and Martha Giles 
along with stenographer Lynda Suther are 
kept busy with never-ending correspon- 
dences, and the processing of more than fif- 
teen hundred applications a year, not to men- 
tion the thousands of other jobs characteristic 
of "right hand men." 

Receptionists Jean Jackson and Robin Old- 
ham act as Davidsons official "welcome 
mats. '" As receptionists, they are not directly 
involved in the selection process and have no 



say as to which students are ultimately select- 
ed by Davidson for admission, but they have 
an immense and direct influence on which 
students ultimately pick Davidson as their 
college choice. For many prospectives and 
their families, Mrs. Jackson and Mrs, Oldham 
are the first and sometimes only personal con 
tact they have with the college prior to their 
interview. First impressions are usually the 
most lasting; and with these two upfront, Da- 
vidson can t>e confident that the school is 
being represented well. 

Officially their jobs as receptionists include 
answering the phone, setting up appoint- 
ments, scheduling tours and class visitations, 
and finding accommodations for prospec- 
tives. Unofficially but equally important, their 
job includes providing for the various needs 
and requests of prospectives, their families, 
faculty, and students alike. It is not unusual 
for them to find themselves searching for sta- 
plers, scissors, or paperclips for students dri- 
ven mad by five o'clock deadlines. Any re- 
quest, if possible, they provide willingly; 
therefore, it is sometimes easy for students 
and parents to forget that even receptionists 
such as these can't do or know everything. 

They are constantly asked for answers they 
can't possibly know and miracles they can't 
possibly perform. Some of their most interest- 
ing questions come from telephone callers. 
One apparently lost soul wanted to know how 
long it takes to get from Montana to Davidson 
— as if Mrs. Jackson drove the route to work 
each day. Another caller, undoubtedly a 
parental figure, wanted to know what percent- 
age of Davidson students drink beer. With 
characteristic charm. Mrs. Oldham pleaded 
ignorance. Many calls come from persons in- 
terested in Davidsons night school classes or 
vocational training program. Mrs. Oldham pa- 
tiently suggests that they try Davidson Com- 
munity College. Oh well, it's all in a days work 
in the Davidson Admissions Office. 

•Tracy Thompson 



cal ones on topics such as office etiquette, 
the appearance of a secretary, and quick 
cooking for working women. 

As a service organization for the college, 
the Chambermaids provide cookies and 
sweets in the Union lobby during exams and 
entertain the international students one night 
each year. They donate cookies to the Union 
for various functions, and at one time helped 
the drama department in small ways with 
costumes and the like. 

Annually the ladies have a Christmas din- 
ner, a boss-appreciation dinner, and a spring 
outing at the lake campus. 

The clubs officers are: Debbie Young (bas- 
ketball secretary), president: Debbie Hoover 
(Dean of Students office), vice-president; Jo 
Archie (secretary for Sterling Martin), secre- 



tary; and Ruth Pittard (audio-visuals), treasur- 
er. The group is also divided into various com- 
mittees such as social, grievances, hospital- 
ity, and new-members. 

Mancy Blackwell, a secretary in the alumni 
office, has been a Chambermaid since the 
group first organized. She said she enjoys the 
"common bond" of the group because 
""sometimes we don't see the others. " "It 
draws all of the secretaries together outside 
the work realm,"' she added. 

•Frances Palmer 

BEING A CHAMBERMAID requires more than just 
friendly smiles Vice-president of the Chambermaids Deb- 
bie Hoover (Dean of Students office) supports Gordon 
Turnbull with a grin while he waits to see the Dean. The 
Chambermaids also contribute chamber made snacks to 
students during exams. 




Administration 181 



The Athletic Side Of Life 




'^. 



i 



f 



TWO FOR THE TEAM. Senior Todd Haynes provided a 
solid shot in the arm for the cats in the '80'81 season. 



EOGENE B. BINGHAM. 

Look who's back! From football player to 
track member to Kappa Sigma brother to di- 
rector of the athletic department, Eugene 
Bingham has seen Davidson from many dif- 
ferent angles. 

The athletic department supervises seven- 
teen intercollegiate teams, five women's 
teams and twelve men's teams. The captains 
from these teams along with the head cheer- 
leader compose the Captain's Council, a com- 
mittee set up this year by Bingham. 

The council serves as advisors to the athle- 
tic director by getting feedback from athletes 
or students, it promotes good sportsmanship 
by the student body, team members and fans, 
the members stress the importance of sports 
and are responsible for meeting, greeting and 
entertaining visiting teams. 

Fund raising for new equipment is in its 
second stage of planning. With a new director 
and a new council, Davidson's athletic depart- 
ment has a new look into the future. 

■Claudia Boykin 

A MANAGER IS ESSENTIAL. Carol Hoopes lends a 
helping hand to the soccer team. 





182 PEOPLE 



Davidson 

Bob Building, uh, I mean Bill Bolding. A 
familiar name to those of us who practice 
acupuncture on the doors, who build unap- 
proved lofts or who dabble in abstract (yet 
unappreciated) modern art on dorm walls, 
not to mention those life-time members of 
the Humane Society who choose to set up 
foster homes for campus strays. Bill Bold- 
ing: "Dorm Despot," Commanding Officer 
of the Davidson College Housing Office 
Rules and Fines Division, "Oppressor of 
the Masses." Obviously a misunderstood 
man. 

Bill Bolding is holding up remarkably 
well considering his dubious campus im- 
age, which is the inevitable result of his 
title, Director of Housing. In fact, he is even 
prospering in spite of his harried working 
conditions. One might say he has learned 
to "smile in the face of adversity." 

The truth is, he has a tough job and he 
does it well. Not only does Bolding take 
care of the upkeep of the dorms, but with 
the help of one part-time assistant, Gracia 
Slater, he coordinates a housekeeping staff 
of fourteen, pairs freshmen roommates, 
keeps track of off-campus students, lo- 
cates housing for transfers, makes reports 
to the physical plant, counsels discipline 
problems, arranges housing for parents 
during commencement, finds host families 
for International students, runs the housing 
lottery . . . and the iist goes on. 

One of the most important and time con- 
suming of his jobs is pairing freshmen 
roommates. Despite what a few ill-fated 
pairs might think, this is not done by 
"eenie, meenie, minie, moe." Bolding care- 





THE SPIDER ON THE CEILING: an aerial view of dorm 
life, and Malcolm Campbell. 



FLESH PILE; being a resident advisor isn't easy, some- 
times the responsibility can be crustiing. 1980-81 resident 
advisors: John Chung. Peter Hairston. Annie Guerard. Bill 
Dascomt)e. David Rhodes. Keith Hearle. Julie Weber, and 
Bruce Wallace 



College Housing: Random Rooming 



fully reads all applications and roommate 
preference sheets in order to become famil- 
iar with each student before he begins the 
pairing process. Care is taken to pair peo- 
ple with similar living habits, but Bolding 
also realizes the importance of diversity. 
From experience he finds that, "perfect 
likes don't usually make good roommate 
pairs." Bolding reports that "by and large 
most are happy" with their roommate(s) 
and that this year he has had fewer re- 
quests for changes. Although freshmen 
must for the most part "stick it out 
through the first term," the Housing Office 
will work with anyone who has a problem, 
and Bolding will suggest alternatives or so- 
lutions to anyone who seeks his advice. 
So, if you are half of an obviously mis- 
matched pair, there is hope of relief. Bold- 
ing points out that requests for roommate 
switches are "more prevalent in upper 
class dorms where people pick their own 
roommates." This seems ironic but as he 
points out, "people think they know some- 
body, they have high hopes and expecta- 
tions, and then they are disappointed when 
things aren't perfect." 

Helping with the selection, training and 
counseling of Hall Counselors is a vital part 
of Bill Bolding's job. This year, however, 
Davidson has expanded this office and ini- 
tiated a Resident Advisor's program in Lit- 
tle, Watts, Cannon and Sentelle. Bolding is 
quick to point out that a Resident Advisor 
is not a Hall Counselor in semi-retirement. 
This program is meant to be an aid to the 
dorm residents as well as to the RA's them- 
selves. It is a para-professional office for 



students interested in careers requiring 
leadership, counseling and communication 
skills. As the housing office bulletin Wild- 
cat Dens explains, "For people in those 
dorms who are not totally awake this year, 
the RAs were the people who issued keys, 
took your complaints, organized study 
breaks, mediated quarrelling roommates, 
offered cold drinks on moving-in-day, 
helped pass (out) aspirin and juice during 
the great flu-in, tried to keep track of vacu- 
um cleaners, master keys, room assign- 
ments, damages, and tried to hold a lid on 
the dorm during the less-sane weekends." 
Bolding is "excited" about the possibilities 
for expanding and utilizing this program 
and hopes that it receives much student 
support in the future. Now that you know 
they exist, take advantage of your RAs! 
(withing all moral and legal boundaries, of 
course). 

Bolding's biggest headache is not coordi- 
nating programs, facilities, requests and 
needs, but, instead, stems from the "reluc- 
tance of students to take responsibility for 
their own actions." For the most part 
drunkenness and selfishness seem to be 
the "root of all problems." Be it known, 
however, that Bill Bolding is definitely not 
against letting loose, practical jokes, or 
drinking per se. All he asks is that we "be 
ingenious" and "not messy"; have fun but 
realize that someone (and usually not the 
students responsible) must clean up the 
"fall out" from shaving cream, baby pow- 
der and baby oil fights, and be aware that 
someone must replace and pay for (often 
times with bloody feet or hands) broken 




BILL BOLDING. 

windows. Bolding is a connoiseur of "ere 
ative revenge" and appreciates ingenious 
efforts. He especially likes last year's at- 
tack with needle and thread on the flies of 
the underwear of many Belk gentlemen (by 
1st Rich) and first Belk's revenge — the 
sabotage of a Richardson fuse box, result- 
ing in a lack of electricity for "eight o'clock 
class " alarm clocks. (The poor girls had no 
time to blowdry and curl their hair!) Bold- 
ing confesses, "We'll even give lessons." 
And from what he's seen (and cleaned up) 
he's sure to have a lot of suggestions. 

Bolding office is in the lounge area of 
Belk, and he is always pleased to have 
people drop in for advice, just to talk and, 
yes, even to complain. In fact, he goes as 
far a to encourage complaints because he 
realizes that "sometimes people need 
someone to scream at!" "Tell us," he goes 
on, "and perhaps we can help." 

•Tracy Thompson 

Administration 183 



Serious Security Business 



Small? They may not have the largest 
building on campus but their job is in no way 
a small one. The average student probably 
thinks that the Public Safety Department's 
sole duty is to distribute parking tickets, but 
they fail to realize how this department af- 
fects many of the aspects of campus life. 

Under the leadership of director Chief Jack- 
ie Hughes and the aid of patrolmen Henry 
Cook, Charles Burton, Wayne King and John- 
ny Griffin, such necessities as identification 
cards, parking decals, fire extinguishers, 
emergency telephone stickers and provisions 
for the handicapped are provided. 

Each man in the department is certified by 
the state after completing 240 hours of train- 
ing. Their diligence continues twenty four 
hours a day every day of the week. They 
emphasize their responsibility for overall safe- 
ty not just security. 

This year the campus is relatively quiet 
according to Sgt. Hughes. Parking is a tempo- 




CAPTAIN JACKIE G. 
HGGHES 

rary problem because of construction on the 
campus. Sgt. Hughes does not understand 
why people will not park across the street 
from the fine arts building where parking is 
plentiful. 

Truly, the size of this department does not 
reflect the extent of their job. 

-Claudia Boykin 




A PLAN OF ACTION confronts Captain Hughes as 
briefs the men on the duties of the day. 




NEW MEETS OLD as DCPC stands gracefully in 
the background Mew efforts are being made to 
keep Davidson vital and gracious. 

NEW BEAUTY BEGINS as the grounds team puts 
in an extra effort to keep Davidson "Southern 
Living" beautiful. 



184 PEOPLE 





«J^ir»\^i «./i.*^.tjA f^-iS'.-fKrrv 



Maintenance Runs Campus Like Clock-Work 




GROVER C. MEETZE. JR. 

Maintenance as always a big job at David- 
son, but in addition to maintenance, this year 
there was a considerable amount of construc- 
tion going on. And through what department 
is all this channeled? It all comes under the 
heading of the Physical Plant. 

Technically, the physical plant includes all 
maintenance work, campus security, con- 
struction work, and planning for future 
growth. Mr. Grover Meetze, Director of the 
Physical Plant, is most specifically involved 
In the last two areas of this department. The 



planning of future building is particularly diffi- 
cult as the buildings are many years in plan- 
ning and one must have a keen perception for 
the future to determine needs many years in 
advance. Mr. Grover Meetze apparently "eno- 
bles" this quality as he has been planning and 
constructing new buildings and facilities for 
Davidson for twenty-five years. 

One problem in particular that Mr. Meetze 
mentioned when planning a building is match- 
ing the "classical architecture" of Davidson. 
While modern buildings are a very practical 
need, they must be properly modified to "fit" 
into the campus. The Library is one such 
example of a contempory building with a clas- 
sical element. The new commons building, 
six years in planning, is another example of 
this meshing of styles to preserve the look of 
the campus. 

After a facility's plans are finalized and 
enough money has been raised to not only 
begin but complete the project, Mr. Meetze 
interviews various architects and the work is 
begun. He continues to work closely with the 
architect and department heads for which the 
facility is designed until completion. 

Mr. Meetze's enthusiasm in Davidson and 



his job can be summed up in two of his clos- 
ing thoughts during an interview. The first is 
the importance of the appearance of the cam 
pus. If the campus is neat, facilities are well 
planned and there is a unified and organized 
feel to it, then people will naturally approach 
Davidson with a good first impression and an 
open frame of mind. This applies to prospec- 
tives, parents, recruiting employers, graduate 
school representatives, . . anyone. The sec- 
ond point he mentioned, and this he empha- 
sized as the main purpose of his work, is that 
Davidson is an institution where students 
come to study and learn. The campus, then, 
is primarily to meet the students' needs, to be 
a place conducive to studying, to be a pleas- 
ant atmosphere to live in, to provide recrea- 
tion and relaxation facilities, and, in general, 
be a place in which students are content and 
happy to reside during their Davidson educa- 
tion. 

Thus, though the Physical Plant has little 
direct contact with most of the student body, 
other than to fix a leaky sink, etc ... it is a 
very important part of Davidson and our edu- 
cation. 

-Lisa Sloan 



Administration 185 



The Union's Many Personalities 



As long as there has been a Davidson Col- 
lege Student Union, its director has been C. 
Shaw Smith. He graduated from Davidson in 
(gasp!) 1939, taught school for a year, and 
returned at the College's request in the fall of 
1940 to run what was then the student YMCA 
program. "In those days, the YMCA did it all," 
the director recalled. "Whatever wasn't under 
the fraternities, was under the Y. " He re- 
mained head of the campus YMCA until 1943, 
when, as he said, "I went off to save the world 
— because of the war." 

Shaw Smith returned, again, in 1952, an 
advent that some have ominously termed 
"the third coming." The College had just cre- 
ated the Student Union and, remembering 
Smith's success with the YMCA in past years, 
they asked him to direct the fledgling organi 
zation. "The first job paved the way," ob- 
served Mr. Smith. "After that, I snuck into 
this one." 

"They thought it was a sneak attack to do 
away with the fraternities," the Union's resi- 
dent eccentric continued, remembering the 
reaction of a large segment of the student 
body in that first year, 1952. Originally the 
Union was established to provide social alter- 
natives to a campus dominated by fraterni- 
ties, but its role has grown in past decades to 
encompass a multiplicity of school functions. 

Shaw Smith relates with relish the tale of 
the student referendum that led to the Union's 
increased budget and power in 1962; he often 
stresses that the student body itself brought 
about the Union's increased influence. Appar- 
ently fraternities were going out of style in the 
liberal sixties, and students wanted campus- 
wide social activities instead of the more ex- 
clusive Greek affairs. Approval of the referen- 
dum meant that each student paid thirty dol- 
lars a year to the Union, which would use the 
money to develop student programs. The ref- 
erendum was passed, and the next year the 
fee was raised to forty dollars. It has remained 
there since, giving the Union an annual oper- 
ating budget of about $52,000. 

The money has been used wisely over the 
years. Under the auspices of its energetic di- 
rector, the Union quickly broadened its scope 




C. SHAW SMITH. 



THOMAS L. BESSELLIEU. LYMAN A. COLLINS II. 



and now funds activities ranging from poetry 
reading to backpacking. With a discerning 
eye for talent, the Union has showcased such 
greats as Dionne Warwick, the Guess Who, 
the Nitty Gritty Dirt Band, and a myriad of 
others just before their names came to be 
household words. Bette Midler came to David- 
son for about $500; in two years she was 
getting $20,000 for every concert. (Her piano 
player, incidentally, was Barry Manilow.) 

Part of the Union formula, though, is bal 
ance. While the organization does sponsor en 
tertainment for Davidson students, it also ar 
ranges cultural opportunities for the campus 
Speakers in past years have discussed here a 
global spectrum of topics and experiences 
Russian dissidence, consumer awareness, ur 
ban renewal, and an endless array of others 
Committees such as Fine Films and Poetry 
have propagated awareness of cultural issues 
through still other media. 

And the master architect of this complex 
achievement worries still. "We do more than 
any other school with the money we have," 
Mr. Smith said, "but it has to cover so 
much." Financial worries aside, though, the 
future looks good for the Union, and as David- 
son's Union thrives, so does the student body. 

-Mike Mason 

A STUDY IN INTENSE CONCENTRATION Is demon 
strated Andy Rock as he gives his all In a demanding 
game of pool. 







BARBARA R. BALLARD. 



AMELIA DOCKERY. 



JOHN T. WEELER. 





ROCK LOBSTER!!! DC students Philip Alter and Syd 
ney Foreman cut loose at the Thursday night discos. 

PHILOSOPHY THRIVES IN THE 900 ROOM: Ed 

Gaynor and Sherri Gravett discuss current affairs and the 
existence of God. 



Counselors Show Warmth And Wisdom 



Often, Davidson students need a hassle-free 
neutral place to go to get advice, to settle 
conflicts, or just to talk. The Counseling Cen- 
ter, located in the Gnion basement, is the 
perfect place for this. The center is staffed 
with three clinical psychologists, Barbara Bal- 
lard, Amelia Dockery, and John Wheeler, who 
are very open and confident about their inde- 
pendent, helping role. They strongly empha- 
size that as consultants they are completely 
free as they are not associated with any other 
part of the college. The consultations in the 



center are completely confidential, and stu- 
dents' permanent records are in no way in- 
volved. Any topic can be broached in the 
counseling center, with conflicts and depres- 
sions involving parents, friends, romance, 
studies, weight, alcohol, sex, and death being 
among the issues frequently dealt with. Aside 
from counseling duties at Davidson, Dr. Bal- 
lard and Mr. Wheeler have private practices in 
Charlotte where they specialize in individual 
psychotherapy as well as marriage and sex 
therapy. They are both avid golfers, and enjoy 



anthropology and architecture. Dr. Dockery 
has spent a great deal of time abroad accom 
panying the Davidson JYA students in Mont 
pellier and she has private practice in David 
son where she specializes in Parent's counse 
ing. She is tremendously active as a role mo 
del for Davidson students interested in psy 
chology, and she enjoys sharing her prowess 
and enthusiasm for the fields of counseling 
and psychology. 

-Bryna Watson 



Administration 187 



AN ARMY OF D.C. T-SHIRTS awaits the onslaught of 
students at the college bookstore. 




Students Stay Well Supplied 




PETER NICHOLLS 

In the basement of the Union is found the 
student's connection to books, supplies, "Da- 
vidson College" t-shirts, cookies, and other 
necessities — the Student Store. Mr. Peter 
Nicholls manages the store and is responsible 
for its operation, purchasing, sales, and super- 
vision of personnel. Working under him are 
Mrs. Chloe Myers, who is in charge of text- 
books and ordering, although her official title 
is "secretary," and Mrs. Rachel Warsham, 
who is in charge of supplies. Working part- 
time now because she is "semi-retired", Mrs. 
Warsham, or Aunt Rachel as she has often 
been called by the students, has been with the 
Student Store since the store began as a 
counter under the stairs of the old (Jnion 
twenty-four years ago. 

The Student Store is stocked with a wide 
variety of items. The staff also makes an 
effort to stock items which students request. 
Although he says he is prejudiced, Mr. Ni- 
cholls feels that the Student Store adequately 
meets most of the Students' needs. 'We try 
to order things which we think people need 
and which you can't get in town." 

■Caroline Boudreau 





EXASPERATION AND FRUSTRATION awaits 
all who encounter drop-aid; with no nnercy being 
shown to senior Gifford Piercy. 



FLIPPIN' DISCS: Bill Dascombe and Andy Umhau 
thumb through the record selection during a student 
store visit 



i 



\ 



Burts Battles Computer Confusion 




RICHARD C. BURTS JR. 

Sinner in dire need of Religion (102) — 
See Dan — Belk 358 A sign of the times: 
Registration. Three times a year, Davidson 
students engage in a scramble for courses, in 
search of that elusive "perfect schedule." 
From the moment registration numbers are 
issued until the last day of Add/ Drop, some 
students plead and cajole for courses while 



WJ 



/ 



others give advice (from experience) about 
such professors as "Smiling F," and "Max 
the Axe." After consulting course selection 
sheets, and their peers, students prepare for 
another round of Registration Roulette. 

As students battle computer odds, course 
ceilings, and minimum graduation require- 
ments. Registrar Richard C. Burts, Jr., and his 
two assistants, Mrs. Eleanor Morthcott and 
Mrs. Frances McCorkie, fight to maintain or 
der and, if possible, their sanity. A quick sur- 
vey of the forms available in the Registrar's 
office gives a good indication of what the job 
entails. There are forms for taking courses 
Pass/Fail, for taking an irregular (more or less 
than 3) course load, for declaring a major, for 
receiving transfer credit and for obtaining a 
transcript. 

In addition to these administrative tasks, 
they must handle frequent complaints lodged 
against a seemingly biased computer. Stu 
dents often blame the computer for not giving 



them a course when, in reality, the student 
simply failed to give the computer the correct 
information. Burts explains, "It is important 
to remember that the computer uses a code 
of three letters and three numbers for each 
course. In the language of the computer, then, 
Chemistry 21 is CHE 021 and not CHEM21." 
Burts adds, "I certainly don't want to admon- 
ish them, but students and faculty could be 
more careful when filling out registration 
forms — not for our sake but for theirs. They 
would be much more satisfied if they were 
more careful." In other words, next time you 
play Registration Roulette, play by the rules 
and perhaps you can beat the computer at its 
own game. 

■Tracy Thompson 



HOW MANY COURSES DID THE COMPUTER GIVE 
YOCJ? a despondent Pat Donley compares a computet 
printout with the course selection sheet 



Infirmary Buzzes With Activity 




Dr. William Williams 



Working in the college infirmary is an occu- 
pation of few exciting moments, yet Nurses 
Christian and Sherrill claim that they find 
their jobs extermely rewarding. "I love to 
work with young people," said Mrs. Sherrill, 
with a distinctly maternal expression. "And 
besides, we get the same holidays they get 
over Christmas and summer-it's really nice!" 

The pace of life at the Infirmary is slow; the 
atmosphere there is something like a cross 
between Grandma's cottage and the recovery 
rooms of Charlotte Memorial. Things are not 
always so unhurried, though. This winter's flu 
epidemic sent the Infirmary staff scrambling 
for help and supplies. "It was awful there for a 
while," declared Mrs. Christian. "Before we 
could get some neighborhood nurses, we did a 
couple of twelve or fourteen hour shifts." The 
epidemic peaked on Saturday, January 10, a 
day on which the doctor does not visit the 
Infirmary." We had nineteen beds full-as soon 
as we'd get one open, somebody else would 
come in sick," Mrs. Sherrill reported. "All we 
could do for most of them was instruct them 
in some self-care, and make sure they had 



someone to get them things." 

Fortunately, the Infirmary usually is neither 
crowded nor unbearably busy. According to 
the nurses, a life and death case only occurs 
once in five or ten years, and it is usually 
placed in the hands of one of the Charlotte 
hospitals as soon as possible. 

What is the most common ailment among 
students? Believe it or not, Davidson's most 
contagious disease may be homesickness. 
"We get lots of freshmen who are away from 
home for the first time," Mrs. Sherrill said, 
adding also that it is necessary to care of 
someone's mental needs in such a situation 
as much as their physical ones. 

Between twenty-five and thirty students 
visit the Infirmary every month because of 
problems ranging from sprained ankles to 
head colds. Work there requires an ability to 
care and to be sensitive to the wants of others 
constantly. This work is demanding. So have 
the nurses ever thought about switching oc- 
cupations? "Why no," blinked one. "Why 
should I?" 

-Mike Mason 




190 PEOPLE 




HOW ABOUT SOME DIMETAP? Dr Hunt prescribes the 
DC cureall to a student desiring medical attention 



Guest House Beauty 



"We're friendly here, and we do everything 
we can to make people feel welcome. That's 
important because the Guest House is often 
the first impression people get of Davidson 
College." 

Mrs. Janie French's job as manager of the 
Guest House is to welcome and provide acco- 
modations for the College's guests. She and 
the hostess, Mattie Fletcher, together with 
three work-study students, run the eight-room 
House and provide a continental breakfast 
every morning, fifty-two weeks a year. A vari 
ety of people stay at the Guest House during 
the year, including prospective faculty and 
students, speakers, visiting professors, alum- 
ni, parents, dates, and trustees. Students 
have even been known to take a room for a 
night or two to get away from the dorm. 

The building was originally a library given 
to the College by Andrew Carnegie and com- 
pleted in 1910. When Grey Library was built, 
the Carnegie building served as a YMCA cen- 
ter for several years before being remodeled 
as a Guest House in 1941. Five years ago, 
after having served a short term as a college 
union when the E.H. Little Library was under 
construction, the building was completely re- 
modeled with funds Inherited from the Horton 
estate. 

The Guest House provides a comfortable, 
convenient place for the College to house its 
visitors and guests. 

-Caroline Boudreau 




Janle French 




THANKS TO ANDY C. the once Andrew Carnegie 
brary now serves the college as a guest house. 



Administration 191 



The Library Is A Center Of Attention 




LELAND M. PARKS 



"What do ya'll do in the summer?" Plen- 
ty. Somebody has to check in the 11,575 
books, magazines, and newspapers that ar 
rive at the library every year. Mrs. Thorn 
as, with the help of Mrs. Wilson, Mrs. Cald 
well and Mr. Children, orders the materials. 
Mrs. Fogleman, business manager, keeps 
track of all the Incoming and outgoing ma 
terials so that they can be sorted by Mrs. 
Pendergraft, Mrs. Dalton, Miss Helvez, 
Mrs. Byrd and Mrs. Goodman. 

After all materials are In the collection, 
Mrs. Beatty, the assistant director, super- 
vises reference. If you ever need eight 
sources on the original of the unknown, the 
library staff is there to help. Miss Wiesnir is 
there to aid people who need specific 
sources from other libraries. 

When you check out books you are like- 
ly to see Mrs. Meeks busy at the circula- 



tion office. The only person you do not 
usually meet is Dr. Park. However, as over- 
seer of the staff, budget and public rela- 
tions, he Is kept extremely busy behind the 
scenes. 

In addition to the permanent library 
staff, there is a student staff available for 
help in finding material, checking out 
books and issuing reserved readings. Dr. 
Park feels that the students who work In 
the library serve as a vital connection be- 
tween the staff and the people who use the 
library facilities. 

All in all, there are many people involved 
in providing library upkeep, service and 
assistance for the college and community. 

Claudia Boykin 

A BEACON IN THE NIGHT: Davidsons EH Little Li- 
brary after dark 



w 

H5O000O 



-4' 




E. LEE WILLINGHAM III 




n' 



1 



P.S. CARNEGIE 





RAISE JOYS AND TRIUMPHS HIGH: Mr Willingham ADD MORE TO THE ABUNDANCE; Cam Zurbruegg 

gleefully announcing the attainment of another target chalks up a revised total on the blackboard. 




Davidson's Top Businessmen 



Believe it or not, the $6000-plus that a 
student pays to Davidson each year does 
not cover the actual cost of running the 
school. In fact, only 60 percent of the bud- 
get comes from tuition fees; the remaining 
forty percent comes from endowment in- 
come and annual gifts from alumni, par- 
ents, and other friends of the college. The 
bulk of the process of solicitation and col- 
lection of gifts to the College is taken care 
of by two offices — the Living Endowment 
Office and the Wildcat Club. 

The Living Endowment Office is run by 
director Lee Willingham. The money raised 
in that office comes from five main 
sources — alumni, parents, corporations, 
friends, and the Presbyterian Synod of 
North Carolina — and has accounted for 
between five and ten percent of the total 
budget in past years. The Living Endow- 
ment fund is very important to the College 
in that these funds are unrestricted; money 
can be appropriated to any area in the 
College which is in need of funds. This year 
was a very important one for the Living 
Endowment because of a challenge made 
by the Charles A. Dana Foundation. The 
Foundation offered a $100,000 gift as a 
stimulus to increase alumni support of the 
College in 1980; if alumni gave $70,000 
more than last year or $438,000, then Da- 
vidson would receive $100,000 from the 
Dana Foundation. Dana also offered to 
match gifts from any new donors $2 for $ 1 . 
As a bonus, Dana promised to give $2,000 
for each percentage point improvement in 
alumni participation in the Living Endow- 
ment over last year's twenty-three percent- 
up to a maximum of $10,000. Through the 
efforts of Mr. Willingham and his staff as 
well as through the help of student volun- 
teers in the "telephonathon, " the Living 



Endowment made its goal of $713,000 this 
year. The fiscal year for the Living Endow- 
ment ended in December so the staff is 
planning to take a much needed rest after 
Christmas and then begin "gearing up for 
next year." 

The Wildcat Club raises funds for the 
entire Intercollegiate Athletic program at 
Davidson. It is run by Executive Director 
Sandy Carnegie and his staff. The Wildcat 
Club provides aid to intercollegiate team 
budgets, facility improvement, equipment, 
automobiles, recruiting, and a wide range 
of other contributions. The Club also oper- 
ates the Athletic Ticket Office, sells adver- 
tising for football and basketball programs, 
sells programs at games, and works with 
the Athletic Department in developing 
sales promotion for Intercollegiate Athlet- 
ics. In 1979 the Club raised $187,849.08. 
They gave financial aid to student athletes 
participating in football, baseball, track, 
and wrestling. They also helped out the 
soccer, swimming, basketball, and field 
hockey programs. In addition they sup- 
plied funds to hire additional coaches for 
football, basketball and women's field 
hockey and basketball teams. 

The minimum donation for a Wildcat 
Club membership is $35. Presently there 
are over seventeen hundred members. 
Each receives "The Track of The Cat" 
which keeps members up on the sports 
scene. The Wildcat Hospitality Room and 
the Coliseum Club Room are open to all 
members and their families and friends 
during basketball and football seasons. 
This year the Wildcat Club raised 
$206,000, the largest amount in their histo- 
ry, to support Davidson athletics. 

-Katie Tully 




SHE THAT BRINGETH GOOD TIDINGS: Nancy Cloyd 
manning the phonathon. 



Administration 193 



DINNER ON THE LAWN was sponsored by the Alumni 
Office in late April. Members of tfie class of 1931. 1936. 
1961. 1971, and 1976 besieged the campus to renew old 

friendships 




OLD PHOTOGRAPHS provided much entertainment for 
alumni during Homecoming weekend. Many of the alum 
ni were shocked at the changes the campus has gone 
through, including the addition of women such as Bunny 
Horrine 80 

CLASS OF 'SI REONION: L Corbett. A Parmele, and A 
Baldwin exchange stories at Alumni Weekend during 
Spring term 




Plenty Of Money Business 



J<*?:iW 



«/ 



S. 



I. 



\M 



With the title "Business Manager. Davidson 
College", go many different duties and re 
sponsibilities. Mr. Bob Currie has been the 
business manager of Davidson College since 
1957. The duty for which Mr. Currie is most 
noted by the students is his work with the 
managers of the college's endowment. Three 
investment firms manage the endowment in 
accordance with the guidelines set by the 

BOB CGRRIE 



trustees of the college. Mr. Currie meets with 
the three managers to ensure their compli- 
ance with these guidelines. At the Trustees' 
biannual meetings, Mr. Currie reports the pro- 
gress of the managers to them. 

Another facet of the business managers 
job is working with various student organiza- 
tions supported by the college. These organi- 
zations include college publications such as 
Quips & Cranks and the Davidsonian as well 
as other student-run organizations such as the 



Chambers Houses Information Sources 






PAT BURGESS 



BILL GIDUZ 



ZACH LOMG 



JOHrS SLATER 



Information about Davidson connes from 
two primary offices — the Communications 
Office and the Alumni Office. The Communi- 
cations Office has three primary functions, 
the first of which is to promote the college, its 
students, and staff through the media. When 
ever there is a "fast-breaking" story about 
Davidson, the Communications Office con- 
tacts either the local newspapers, radio or 
television stations to inform them of the event 
in order for them to present it to the commu- 
nity. John Slater, the Director of Communica- 
tions, says that one of the best ways to keep 
the good name of the college in the forefront 
is by promoting the newsworthy activities of 
the students. Whenever a student receives an 
honor or award, his or her hometown newspa- 
per is informed. 

The second function is publication. The 
Communications Office publishes the David- 
son Update seven times each year, the 
monthly WDAV program guide, the Davidson 
Fortnight, a biweekly, as well as the Davidson 
College Catalogue and several news let- 
ters. Whenever a department needs a publi- 
cation, the Communications Office handles 
the job for them. They do anything from de- 
signing JYA pamphlets to writing copy and 



taking pictures for pamphlets on sports. The 
most visible member of the Communications 
Office is Bill Giduz who is often seen lurking 
in the corners of Chambers ready to snap the 
picture an an unsuspecting professor or stu 
dent. These photographs are often used in 
other publications unrelated to the Communi- 
cations Office such as the Wildcat Handbook 
and Quips & Cranks. 

The third function of the Communications 
Office is to oversee WDAV and ensure its 
smooth operation during the year. 

The second source of information at David- 
son is the Alumni Office. (Jnder the direction 
of Zach Long, alumni meetings, dinners and 
parties are held from Boston to San Fran 
Cisco, Chicago to New Orleans, or anywhere a 
group of one or more alumni can be gathered 
to hear news concerning the school. Although 
these gatherings may not be as derelict as the 
typical Patterson Court party, they are enter 
taining and provide an opportunity for alumni 
to congregate for a good time and hear about 
Davidson. Long usually plans short programs 
where he and others such as Chalmers David- 
son, Frontis Johnson, Will Terry. Charlie Rat- 
liff, John Griffith, Nick Burnette, and Sam 
Spencer inform the alumni of the recent hap- 



penings at Davidson as well as the prospects 
for the future. Long believes that the best 
alumni are informed alumni. 

Aside from stimulating alumni through 
these meetings, the Alumni Office entertains 
them during Homecoming and Alumni Week- 
ends. Here the alumni have the opportunity to 
visit the campus and renew acquaintances 
with contemporaries and former professors. 
They can even purchase pieces of Davidson- 
iana which include such items as Neckties 
with the Davidson seal, Davidson chairs, and 
even Wedgwood plates with the Chambers 
Building pictured in the center. Each year for 
the major reunions such as the tenth, twenty- 
fifty, fortieth, and fiftieth, the office secretar- 
ial staff, headed by Mrs. Nancy Blackwell, 
complies reunion b>ooks describing what each 
member of the class is doing at that point in 
time. Current news of classmates is also writ- 
ten up two to three times each year in the 
class section of the Davidson Update. The 
office continually updates alumni records for 
these purposes as well as to keep alumni 
continually in contact with and informed 
about each other. 

-Russell Snipes 



Black Student Coalition. Mr. Currie along with 
the Activities Tax Council meets with the 
business managers of these organizations to 
outline budgets and allot funds for their opera- 
tion during the school year. He also works 
with the eating houses and fraternities of Pat- 
terson Court to ensure their financial solven- 
cy. 

College real estate separate from the cam- 
pus is managed through the business office. 
The college owns approximately 50 housing 
units including faculty apartments adjacent 
to Richardson Dorm, Jackson Court apart- 
ments, and several houses in the town. Mr. 
Currie explains that housing college person 



nel is difficult due to a shortage of housing in 
Davidson. To offset this shortage, the college 
subsidizes homes built by faculty and admin- 
istration officials who have worked with the 
college for two or more years. Aside from 
residential properties, the college owns prime 
commercial properties in downtown Char- 
lotte and on Independence Boulevard. In Da- 
vidson the college owns the post office and 
local doctors' office. Elsewhere in the state, 
there are farms and a mountain resort owned 
by the school. Mr. Currie is responsible for 
collecting the revenues from these properties 
and overseeing their upkeep. 

Working with the managers of the endow- 



ment, working with student organizations, 
and overseeing college real estate are only 
three facets of the position of business man- 
ager. Mr. Currie also manages the daily finan- 
cial matters of the school. He also oversees 
the operation of the auxiliary enterprises of 
the college such as the laundry and student 
store. The newest auxiliary enterprise is the 
college's new food service which will operate 
in the new Commons and the union snack 
bar. Mr. Currie feels that by the college run- 
ning its own food service, a higher quality of 
food can be attained. He will work with the 
college food service manager to ensure this 

^" Russell Snipes 



Administration 195 



RUPERT T. BARBER. JR., Associate Professor of The- 
atre and Speech, B.S.. Ph.D. (Louisiana State), MA. (Co- 
lumbia) 

GEORGE LAWRENCE ABERNETHY. Charles A. Dana 
Professor Emeritus of Philosophy, A B (Bucknell), MA 
(Oberlin), Ph.D. (Michigan) 



*>• -•■I 




JOSEPH RON BRANCH. Assistant Professor of 
Military Science, B.S. (Appalachian) 




^ 



mt 



^ ■ J 




ANTHONY S. ABBOTT. Professor of English, A.B. (Prin 
ceton), MA.. Ph.D. (Harvard) 



196 PEOPLE 



RICHARD RYERSON BERNARD. Vail Professor of 
Mdlhematics, BS. MS. PhD (Virginia) 




Ault Plants 
Roots At 
Davidson 



Dr. Ruth Ault circled the U.S. before put 
ting down roots in Davidson a year and a half 
ago. Born in Chicago, Dr. Ault went to school 
at Pomona College in California and at GCLA, 
and she taught in Utah for several years. She 
likes the atmosphere at Davidson because it 
reminds her of Pomona, also a small liberal 
arts college. 

Dr. Ault is married, and as a child psycholo- 
gist, has chosen not to have children. She is 
on the Board of Directors at the Family Sup- 
port Center located in Charlotte which offers 
help to child abusers. Presently she is helping 
to train a group of Davidson students to an 
swer the Center's "stress lines " which will be 
installed at the College this spring. She hopes 
that the opportunity to participate in this pro- 
gram by answering the Center's telephones 
will soon be an extracurricular activity open 
to all students. 

Dr. Ault and her husband travel together 
frequently on business and family trips. They 
are both interested in horseback riding and 
ride several times a week. Dr. Ault reveals her 
creative talents in macrame and in latch 
hooked wall hangings. 

■Katie Tully 



ROTH L. AULT. Assistant Professor of Psychology. 
B.A. (Pomona), M.A., Ph.D. (CJCLA) 



FRANK WALKER BLISS. JR.. Dean of the Center for 
Special Studies and Professor of English, A.B. 
(Emory), M.A., Ph.D. (Minnesota) 



FACULTY 197 



FELIX ALVIN CARROLL. JR.. Assistant Professor of 
Chemistry. B.S-. M.S.. Ph.D (Penn State Qniv.) 




Needs A Breather 



Burnett Too Busy For O 



How has it happened that Dr. J.fS. Bur 
nett, a Chemistry professor at Davidson for 
almost 13 years, has never been on sab- 
batical? One fairly "concrete" reason can 
be found directly across from the Student 
Union. That's right — Martin Science 
Building. 

"Mr. Meetze and I planned the renova 
tion together." That was way back in 1969. 
The first blueprints for the new building 
were drawn up in 1970. But between that 
time and the actual construction in 1978, 
there was plenty to do in the area of fund 
raising. The Chemistry building had to wait 
its turn on the college's list of "priority 
projects." One of the greatest strengths of 
Davidson, Dr. Burnett feels, is the fact that 
Davidson does not embark on a new pro- 
ject without sufficient funds to complete it. 

The necessary funds were available for 
the reconstruction in 1978, so the con- 
struction began. Mr. Grover Meetze and Dr. 
Burnett supervised the actual building, and 
the outcome was a great success. "Every 
one seems pleased with the building, the 
labs, and especially the Thurman room. 
Other groups outside the chemistry depart- 
ment have used the room . . . I'm glad they 
can enjoy it too," comments Dr. Burnett. 

Mow that the Chemistry building is ren- 
ovated . . perhaps Dr. Burnett can take a 
breather? Don't count on it! On August 1, 
1980, he assumed the position of Associ- 
ate Dean of Faculty to work part time with 
Dean Zimmerman. The rest of Dr. Bur- 



nett's time is spent serving as the Chair- 
man of the Chemistry department and a 
professor of Chemistry. His duties as Dean 
of Faculty include assistance in fund rais- 
ing, development of grant proposals in the 
science departments, and special assis- 
tance with the projected computer center 
for the college. 

With such a demand on his time, abili 
ties, and resources. Dr. Burnett really 
needs to relax at the end of the day. Home, 
however, may not provide peaceful relax- 
ation. Awaiting his return each day is Katu, 
a 2-year-old Siberian Husky, full of love and 
affection and ready for a good romp. In 
addition to evening walks, Katu likes to 
wrestle in the living room. Of course Dr. 
Burnett complies . how do you argue 
with a Husky? 

Many students recognize and appreciate 
Dr. Burnett's talent and dedication as a 
professor, especially through the trials of 
Chem. 41. Many administrators and facui 
ty personnel recognize and appreciate Dr. 
Burnett's talent in the fields of fund-raising, 
future planning and his conviction to get 
these jobs done. Davidson is a special insti- 
tution and it takes the dedication of people 
like Dr. Burnett to keep it growing and 
expanding ... to keep it special. Thank 
you. Dr. Burnett. 

-Lisa Sloan 

JOHN NICHOLAS BURNETT. Asociate Professor 
Chemistry, B A . M S . Ph D.. (Emory) 




VERNA CASE, Assistant Professor of Biology. B S.. 
MS. Pfi D (Penn State (Jniv ) 

J. P. BROCKWAY. Assistant Professor of Psycfiolo 
gy. A B ll <itdvettf). M S . Pfi D (Penn State (Jniv ) 




R.L. BRCIBAKER. Visiting Professor of Religion. 
B A (Wooster). M Div. (Union. MY). MA. Pfi D. 
(Chicago) 

LAURENCE S. CAIN. Assistant Professor of Pfiys- 
ics. B.S (Wake Forest), M.S.. Pti.D. (Virginia) 




ALBERT G. BRAOER. II. Assistant Professor of 
Military Science, B.A. (Tfie Citadel) 

HORACE ALDEN BRYAN, Professor of Chemis- 
try. A.B (King). Ph.D. (Tennessee) 



Faculty 199 



CHARLES L. CORNWELL. Associate Professor of 
Englisfi, A B. (Davidson). M.A.. Ph.D. (Virginia) 




Daggy Heads To The Rio 



CHARLES D. DOCKERY. Assistant Professor of 
Frencfi, B.A. (Earlham). M.A., Ph.D. (Iowa) 



After 33 years as a professor and Biology 
department cfiairman, Dr. Tom Daggy is 
ready to retire, and he is ready to travel. His 
first plans are to fiead for the Texas Rio 
Grande area and then into Mexico where his 
daughter is now living. When asked why the 
Rio Grande, he replied immediately, "Because 
I've never collected there." What kind of rea- 
son is that to travel hundreds of miles? Well, 
for a man who has spent a great deal of his 
life studying and collecting various plants and 
insects, it's a very exciting and rewarding 
reason to travel. 

Dr. Daggy did his undergraduate work at 
Earlham College in Richmond, Indiana. He 
went on to Northwestern University for his 
graduate studies, and before coming to David 
son in 1948 he taught at Olivet College in 
Olivet, Michigan. 

Since coming to Davidson, Dr. Daggy has 
done extensive research on insects, beetles in 
particular. Rumor has it that there is a beetle 
named after him. This true; however. Dr. Dag- 
gy didn't actually discover the "Daqai " beetle 
but sent it to one of his associates who then 
named it after him. 



In all of his years of research he has pub- 
lished very little. There are several groups of 
beetles, however, on which he has extensive 
data that "really should be published. " He's 
hoping to get around to this in his retirement. 
Technically, "people are supposed to have 
more time on their hands when they retire," 
he said. 

However, any time Dr. Daggy may gain In 
retirement is all too likely to be used up by his 
research and travel. But that's fine with him, 
and he recounts a favorite story about a re- 
tired professor who wanted only to sit in his 
rocker and get up only to let the cat out. 
"Well, he may have done that, but he didn't 
live very long." 

So Dr. Daggy keeps making his plans. He 
expects to be making plans and taking trips 
for a long, long time yet. 

-Lisa Sloan 

TOM DAGGY. Professor of Biology, A.B (Earlham). 
M.S., Ph.D. (Northwestern) 




RICHARD CARGILL COLE. Professor of English. A B 
(Hamilton). MA.. Ph D. (Yale) 

j C. EARL EDMONDSON. Associate Professor of History. 
' B A (Mississippi College). M.S., Ph.D. (Duke) 




MILTON P. DAILEY, IV, Visiting Professor of Sociology. 
B.A. (Louisiana State) 




JEAN S. CORNELL. Assistant Professor of Speech. B.A. 
(Ohio Wesleyan). M.S.J. (Northwestern). MA. (Arizona) 

THOMAS FETZER CLARK. Associate Professor of Reli- 
gion. A B. (Davidson). B D. (Union Seminary, Richmond). 
Ph.D. (Aberdeen) 



FACULTY 201 



C.P. FROST. Visiting Professor of Classics, B A (Wake 
Forest). MA, (Trinity). Ph.D. (Cincinnattl) 




French Unveils Talents 



Who would expect an associate professor 
of classics to be an accomplished musician? 
Well, Dirk French has talents in both areas. 

French started his college career at the 
Lawrence Conservatory. The conservatory 
was separate from the rest of the college, but 
he received permission to take Greek from 
the regular academic school. He became Inter- 
ested in other courses, and by the time he 
graduated, he had a double major in piano and 
classics. 

French also enjoys playing the organ. Dur- 
ing his first three years at Davidson, he took 
lessons from Professor Wilmer Welsh. Last 
year French joined a composition seminar un- 
der the instruction of Welsh which currently 
meets each Friday. Welsh, French, and two 
students. Buzz Foster and Robin Dinda, got 
together to share their latest progress, to cri- 
tique each others work, and to offer construc- 
tive advice. In the seminar, French is study- 
ing orchestration, a new area for him, and he 
is experimenting with string compositions. 

On December sixth the Davidson Renais- 
sance Ensemble, of which French and his 
wife are members, presented the 'Canon for 
the Second Sunday of Advent." a piece which 
French wrote in 1978. A week later at the 



Christmas Vespers he gave the first perfor- 
mance of his Chorale Fantasy for Organ and 
Chorus entitled "O Savior, Rend the Heavens 
Wide." 

French is also interested in art and anthro- 
pology. During the 1979 July Experience, he 
combined some of his interests and talents to 
form a unique course entitled Mythology in 
Music, Literature, and Art. 

In the course, which explored various over- 
lapping world myths, French emphasized a 
"unity of the arts." According to French, "All 
the arts must compose." The artist must se- 
lect what to include and what not to include, 
and he must decide how to arrange his materi- 
al. 

Through discipline and self-criticism, 
French plans to continue to study and prac- 
tice various kinds of music. 

-Frances Palmer 



DIRK FRENCH. Associate Professor of Classics 
(Lawrence). MA,, Pfi.D. (Princeton) 






JOSEPH TATt GARDNER. JR.. Assistant Pro 
fessor o( Thedtte and Speech. B A (Davidson). 
MA. PhD (Florida Stale) 



WILLIAM FRANCIS FREY. Associate Professoi 
ot Physics. A B (King). MS. Ph D (Vanderbllt) 



RALPH WILLIAM GABLE. Associate Professor of Chem 
istry. BS (Texas). MA. PhD. (Duke) 



PATRICIA B. FDMONDSON. Lecturer in Human 
ities. B A (Midwestern). MA. Ph D (Duke) 




HANSFORD M. EPES, JR.. Associate Professor 
of German. A.B. (Davidson). Ph.D. (U.N C Chapel 
Hill) 

JAMES MONROE FREDERICKSEN. Professor of 
Chemistry. B.S. (Richmond). PhD. (Virginia) 



Faculty 203 



Survival Of 
The Fittest 

Gil Holland evidently believes in "the sur- 
vival of the fittest," as one must struggle 
mentally through drafts upon drafts of papers 
for his classes and struggle physically 
through his office door. His favorite hobbies 
are "doing the heavy bear dance" the first 
day of class each term and "baiting stu- 
dents," both of which he does very effective- 
ly, as any English major, advisee, or survivor 
of one of his classes can tell you. Amazingly 
enough, he can do both v^ith a smile and a 
gleeful chuckle. He is interested in languages 
(he is fluent in Chinese and Swedish), photog 
raphy, art, poetry, and current events. He 
writes poetry and is currently working on 
some Chinese translations. He states emphati 
cally that he is not interested in watching 
football on TV, gardening, jogging, playing 
the guitar, or cleaning out his office! 

Katie Tully 



JOHN GIL HOLLAND, Associate Professor of Englisfi 
A.B, (Wasfiington and Lee). Pfi.D. (O.N.C. Chapel Hill) 




J. ALBERTO HERNANDEZCHIROLDES, Assistant Pro 
fessor of Spanish, B.A. (University of Puerto Rico), M.A. 
(Middlebury), Ph.D. (Texas) 




MORELAND A. HOGAN. Visiting Lectu 
B.A, (Rice), M.A. (Harvard) 



WILLIAM BLANNIE MIGHT. JR.. Professor of Educa 
tion, A.B., M.Ed., Ph.D. (a.N.C.-Chapel Hill) 




PETER NEAL HESS. Visiting Professor of Eco- 
nomics. B.A. (Bowdoin) 




s^v 


i^ jmm 


W^^' ' 


Kh^^^^KL 



DAVID CARROLL GRANT. Associate Professor of Biol 
ogy, A.B. (Wooster), Pfi.D. (Yale) 



CYNTHIA THOMAS GRANT. Assistant Professor of Bi 
ology. A.B. (Wellesley). Pfi.D. (Yale) 



Faculty 205 



DONALD L. KIMMEL. JR.. Professor of Biology, A B 
(Swarthmore). M.D , M.Sc. (Temple). Pfi.D, (Yale) 

ROBERT KENNEDY. Assistant Professor of Psycfiology 
A.B (Holy Cross). MS., Pfi.D. (Penn State Univ.) 



Jackson And The Art 
Of Making Art 

"Art is a way of living. When you're an artist, 
you're an artist all the time." 

■Herb Jackson 

This statement aptly describes the head of 
Davidson's Art department. He has been 
teaching art for twelve years, and when he is 
not teaching he is a professional painter. His 
work consists of large, heavily-textured ab- 
stract paintings which he exhibits nationwide. 
His wife, Laura Grosch, is a painter also. Al- 
though he has always been an abstract artist, 
he has very liberal tastes. "If it's good," he 
says, "then it's timeless." 

While art is his main interest, it is not his 
only one. His family, which consists of his 
wife and his four-year-old son Leif, is very 
important to him. He also enjoys yoga, wine, 
and travel, and he usually spends his sum- 
mers traveling and "making art. " 

He loves teaching and is excited about the 
future of the art department at Davidson 
(which, by the way, is his alma mater). He 
feels a sort of "missionary zeal " to create 
visual information for his students. He says 
that art is the only completely non-verbal ex- 
perience at Davidson, and it adds dimensions 
to people's attitudes, teaching them a differ- 
ent way of perceiving the world. Most of the 
students that he teaches do not go on with art 
but go into professions that are unrelated to 
it; however, he says, "It doesn't hurt to open 
their eyes." 

-Caroline Boudreau 



WALTER HERBERT JACKSON. Associate Professor 
of Art. A.B. (Davidson), M.F.A. (O.N.C. -Chapel Hill) 



206 PEOPLE 




LUNSFORD RICHARDSON KING. Associate Pro 
tcssor ol Mathematics. BS (Davidson). PhD 

(DnKrl 



BENJAMIN G. KLEIN. Associate Professor of 

Mathematics. A B (Rochester). M.A.. Ph.D. (Yale) 




LO,S ANNE KEMP. Associate Professor of Spanish. A B JOHN ^OBBir^SK ELTON. ^^^^I^essor^o'^fycho,. 



ROBERT DAVID KAYLOR. Associate Professor of Reli 
gion. A B (Southwestern). B.D. (Louisville Seminary). 
Ph D (Duke) 



FACtlLTY 207 



She Travels Not For Travel's Sake 



A sad and degrading misconception has 
affixed itself these days to the act of travel- 
ling abroad to European countries. Travelling 
seems to be merely thought of as, quite literal 
ly, sightseeing — the romantic view that one 
will experience shopping in Paris, strolling 
among the ruins in Rome, having one's pic- 
ture made with the guards at Buckingham 
Palace in London, and generally, only seeing 
the sights. These events are usually associat- 
ed with equally romantic people. The high 
school kid out for summer vacation, the col- 
lege student equipped with backpack and 
Eurorail Pass, and the retired couple accom 
panied by a busload of fellow senior citizens 
are all envied by friends who are unable to 
join in such international adventures. Dr. Me- 
linda Lesher, associate professor of Art Histo- 
ry, is not this type of traveler, however. One 
thing, and one thing alone, drives Dr. Lesher 
to Europe each year, and that is the pursuit of 
dedicated study, for Dr. Lesher is an Art Histo 
rian in every sense of the word. 

For the past ten years, Melinda Lesher has 
travelled to Europe for the sole purpose of 



researching and re-researching her doctoral 
dissertation topic, "The 'Vision of St. Ber- 
nard' and the Chapel of the Priors . . .". 
Though Dr. Lesher received her doctorate in 
1979, she has continued work on this subject 
in hopes that she will eventually be able to 
publish her findings. 

Art History Is a subject that, as the name 
suggests, pertains not only to the apprecia- 
tion of art, but also to the history of art. The 
"Vision of St. Bernard " is located in the Chap 
el of Priors in Florence. Dr. Lesher is deter- 
mined to find out why and how this particular 
image was chosen for the chapel; the act of 
acquiring this information has taken her into 
museums and archives in Florence, Rome, 
and London. 

A great majority of Dr. Lesher's research 
has been conducted in the Italian National 
Archives, located in the basement of the Clf- 
fizzi Gallery in Florence. She estimates that 
she has spent six full months of her life pour- 
ing over ink-faded, original 15th century Ital- 
ian manuscripts and translating the legisla- 
tive documents from Italian into English. The 



Chapel of Priors, itself, contains a series of 
thirty-three Latin inscriptions, all of which 
had to be translated through Dr. Lesher's 
working knowledge of paleography. Although 
she admits that the inscriptions appear dull, 
she mused with affection, "I've grown rather 
fond of them." 

Dr. Lesher has encountered many forms o 
art in the course of her research on "The 
Vision of St. Bernard". One manuscripi 
proved to be particularly interesting in its ref 
erence to the Priors' private toilets, which 
were frescoed by Ridolfo Ghirlandaio. This 
inspired the idea of a documentary-based I 
book on art in the bathroom throughout hist 
ry — dating from the painted bathrooms o. , 
Pompeii to the graffitied walls of today — s 
project Dr. Lesher has considered undertak 
ing only after the completion of her work on 
St. Bernard. 

-Diane Odor 

MELINDA LESHER. Assistant Professor of Art, A.B. 
(Vassar), MA.. M Pfiil,, Ph.D (Columbia). 




CYNTHIA LEWIS. Assistant Professor of English. B A 
(Oliio State). M.A.. Ph.D. (Harvard) 



PETER M. KRENTZ. Assistant Professor of History, B.A,, 
M A., Ph.D. (Yale). 



m;^wj^ jijinip 




^^0f/^tf^^i^. 



208 PEOPLE 



WILLIAM DAVID LAWING. Assistani Professor 
of Music. B.A. (Davidson). MM.. DMA. (Cleve- 
land Institute of Music). 




GEORGE LABBAN. Jr.. W R Grey Professor of Classics, 

A.B., MA.. Ph.D. (Texas). 



LARRY L. LIGO, Assistant Professor of Art. A B. 
(Muskingum). B D. (Princeton Seminary). Pfi.D. 
((J M.C.Chapel Hill). 



Faculty 209 



A Fuzzy Set? 

Ever heard of a fuzzy set? Don't worry — 
not many have. But if it is a subject of para- 
mount concern to you, then you will be happy 
to know that Davidson has a resident author 
ity on the topic in the person of Dr. Earl 
MacCormac. 

If your tastes run more to the linguistic 
significance of metaphor, or perhaps an ex- 
amination of the concept of ambiguity, Dr. 
MacCormac can enlighten you somewhat 
there as well. In fact. Dr. MacCormac's inter- 
ests are so varied that it is difficult to find a 
topic on which he is not conversant, if not 
downright authoritative. One wonders how he 
finds time to be chairman of the Philosophy 
Department. 

Dr. MacCormac has taught at Davidson 
some twenty years, and he claims that this is 
his primary interest. "I want to produce stu- 
dents who are satisfied," he said. "Mot satis- 
fied in money, but doing what they want." In 
spite of the research he carries on so con- 
stantly, he often stresses that his first duty is 
to his students. "I came here to be a teacher, 
not a scholar," he remarked, although how he 
has managed to do both so well remains 
something of a mystery, given the large 
amounts of time both require. 

Not all of Dr. MacCormac's goalsare so 
altruistic, however. "Someday I'd like to have 
enough money to buy the books I want, and 
to travel where I want," mused the depart- 
ment head. Suddenly his expression changed, 
and he leaned eagerly forward. "But I'd really 
like to write a good paper on metaphor," he 
exclaimed. "It's really fascinating ..." 

-Mike Mason 



EARL RONALD MACCORMAC. Professor of Pfiilos 
ophy, B.E.. MA.. B,D . Ph D. (Yale) 



ALEXANDER JEFFREY MCKELWAY. Associate 
Professor of Religion, A.B (Davidson), B.D. (Princeton 
Seminary). Th.D. (Basel) 




ROBERT JOHN MANNING. Associate Professor of 
Phiysics, A.B, (Gettysburg). M.S., Phi.D. (Virginia) 



210 FACULTY 



ANN MCMILLAN. AssisUnl Professor of English. ROBERT E. MAYDOLE. Assistant Professor of Pfii 

BA (Agnes Scott). MA . Pli D (Induin.il losophy. BS (St Josephs). PfiD (Boston University) 




JOHN ALEXANDER MCGEACHY. Mary Reynolds GLENN CARLOS LINDSEY. Assistant Professor of 

Babcock Professor Ermitus of History. A B. (Dav Economics. B.B.A.. M.A.. B.D., Ph.D. (Vale) 

dison). MA (UNC Chapel Hill). Ph D (Chicago) 



SAMUEL DOW MALONEY. Professor of Religion, 
A.B (Davidson). B.D.. Th.M.. Th.D. (Union Seminary, 
Richmond) 



FACULTY 211 



? f« J" 



ROBERT A MYERS. Assistant Professor of Anthropolo 
gy. B A (Davidson). M.A., Ph.D. (a.N.C.Chapel Hill). 
WINFRED PLEASANTS WINTER. Professor of Politi 

cal Science. B.S., M.S. (Virginia Poiytecfi), Ph D (Chi WILLIAM RODGER NOTT. Associate Professor of Chem- 
cago). istry. A.B. (Ohio Wesleyan), M.A.. Ph.D. (Duke). 





The 'Cartoon Board' Man 



There is not a student at Davidson who has 
not stopped to examine the mass of political 
pictures and quotes haphazardly stapled to 
the wall outside Dr. Louis Ortmayer's third 
floor office. "If I'm known for anything." he 
smiled and said. "I guess it's that cartoon 
board." 

A great number of students, however, 
know Dr. Ortmayer for other reasons. Sports- 
minded girls recognize him as one of the two 
volleyball coaches. Students of a more aca- 
demic bent are acquainted with him in his role 
as the sponsor of the current events discus- 
sion group. Still others probably have ob 
served him swinging away on neighborhood 
turfs in hopes of improving his golf game. 

Politics remains Dr. Ortmayer's paramount 



interest, though. "My field is international 
politics — European politics in particular." 
he explained, revealing further that he has 
traveled extensively in both Eastern and 
Western Europe, particularly Germany. At 
present. Dr. Ortmayer is putting the finishing 
touches on a book he has written about West 
German economic politics. 

-Mike Mason 



LOUIS L. ORTMAYER, Assistant Professor of Political 
Science, B A. (Yale). M.A., Ph.D. (University of Denver). 




212 PEOPLE 



RANDY F. NELSON, Assistant Professor of Englisti. 
BA. MA (NC Slate). MA. Pfi D (Princeton) 



CORA LOUISE NELSON. Professor of Economics. 

B S , Ph D (CJ N C Chappl Hill) 




DAVID MtlTCHLER, Visiting Professor of Malfiemat- 

Ics. B A , MA. (CIniv. of Virginia). 



ALFRED R. MELE. Visiting Assistant Professor of JOHN S. MORRISON. Mellon Visiting Professor of Hu 
Philosopfiy. B.A. (Wayne State). Phi.D. (Michigan) manltles. MA (Trinity College. Cambridge). 



Faculty 213 



The Activist 
On Campus 

Dr. Ernest Patterson lives and teaches by 
the words "peace, freedonn, and justice." He 
considers himself an "activist"; whether in 
the classroom, in speeches, in newspaper edi- 
toral columns across the country, or through 
the wearing of his famous peace tie. Dr. Pat- 
terson has sought to communicate this mes- 
sage. He believes strongly that people should 
be aware of ail sides of an issue and has 
strived "to present the other side" both in and 
outside the classroom. Although nicknamed 
"Red Ernie" by students, Dr. Patterson con- 
siders himself to be a socialist. Dr. Patterson's 
most famous stage appearance to date was in 
last year's spring play, A FUNNY THING 
HAPPENED ON THE WAY TO KENYA, 
where he dressed in a red, white, and blue suit 
with a pistol on his tie. He is now retired and is 
a Professor Emeritus of Economics. He teach- 
es classes occasionally as several professors 
in that department are on leave this year. 



-Katie Tully 



ERNEST FINNEY PATTERSON. Professor Emeritus 
of Economics. B.S. (Southwest Texas Teachers), 
M.A., Ph.D. (Texas). 




MAJOR WILLIAM PITTMAN. Assistant Professor of 
Military Science, B.S. ((Jniv. of Nebraska). 



PHILIP PENNANCE. Assistant Professor of Math 
ematics. B S ((Jniv of Hull), M.S. (Leeds). 



MAX EUGENE POLLEY. Professor of Religion. 
A.B. (Albion), B.D., Ph.D. (Duke). 



214 PEOPLE 



THOMAS OWEN PINKERTON. Professor of Ger 
man. BS (Davidson). LL B (Vanderbilt). PhD 
(CJNC. Chapel Hill). 



EDWARD L. PALMER, Associate Professor of Psycholo- 

<iy. A B (Gellysburg). B D (Gettysburg Seminary), M.S., 
Ph.D. (Ohio). 




ROGER E. POWELL. Professor of Military Sci 
ence. B.A. (Davidson). M.S. (George Washington 
Univ.). 

MALCOLM OVERSTREET PARTIN. Associate 
Professor of History. A.B. (a.N.C.-Chapei Hill). 
M.A . Ph.D. (Duke) 



Faculty 215 



Ratliff Works Overtime 



Before entering a business career, he 
taught at Davidson just as temporary employ 
ment and "good experience" on the record. 
"But during my second year here the teach- 
ing bug bit me" and he's been here ever since 
. . . Who's that? . . . why, Dr. Charles Ratliff, 
one of Davidson's most active faculty mem- 
bers in the past 34 years. 

Active is certainly the word to describe Dr. 
Ratliff as he leads his classes through compli- 
cated economic theories by illumination with 
his personal opinions, anecdotes, and specific 
questions to individual students. And what 
keeps this man in the business of economic 
illumination year after year? Dr. Ratliff sums 
it up nicely as he comments, "My greatest 
satisfaction comes from seeing someone light 
up as the meaning of something I'm explain- 
ing becomes clear." 

Obviously he takes the responsibility of 
working with the students very seriously. But 
he has managed to indulge in other intellectu- 
al affairs also. He has published two books, 
one a public finance text and the other a 
research book dealing with business income 
and state taxes. He is also author of several 
journal articles. His academic achievements 
have been recognized by Davidson with an 
appreciation award from the alumni in 1970, 
and a Thomas Jefferson award in 1972. He 
was also selected as an Outstanding Ameri- 
can Educator in 1972 is listed in American 
Men of Science, Contemporary Authors, and 
the Who's Who of this country and the world. 

The accomplishments sound exhausting, 
but catch your breath for there's more. For 
with a twinkle in his eye. Dr. Ratliff goes on to 
explain that while he has been "employed" 
by Davidson for the last 34 years, he has not 
always been in Davidson. Aside from his 



years working on a Ph.D. at Duke University 
and later working on a Ford Foundation re- 
search, he worked as an economics professor 
at Forman Christian College in Lahore, Paki- 
stan, This position was received upon ap- 
pointment by the Methodist Board of Global 
Ministries. 

Dr. Ratliff recalls his Pakistan experience 
eagerly. He considers his four years there an 
extremely enlightening experience, especially 
in the area of world hunger. His subsequent 
gratitude and loyalty to the Pakistanian peo- 
ple is evident by his three return trips to Paki- 
stan during summer breaks and his involve- 
ment as a speaker for the Pakistan mission 
and world hunger at various churches. 

His concern and dedication to the under- 
privileged does not end with world hunger 
though. As Chairman of the Davidson com 
munity relations committee, he has worked 
for providing adequate housing for Davidson 
citizens through subsidized rent apartment 
complexes and renovation of older homes in 
the area. Community activities also include 
involvement in the Davidson United Method- 
ist Church. 

Dr. Ratliff's genuine love and concern for 
people is the secret to keeping up with his 
active lifestyle. This concern overflows into 
his classrooms as he is aware of each individ- 
ual student and willingly caters to particular 
needs. Dr. Ratliff is truly a "people person" 
and if you ever find a few minutes to spare on 
second floor Chambers sometime, stop in 
C222 and see for yourself. -Lisa Sloan 



CHARLES EDWARD RATLIFF, JR.. William R Kenan. 
Jr . Professor of Economics. B.S. (Davidson), MA. Pfi D 
(Duke) 




/ 




DANIEL DURHAM RHODES. Cfiarles A. Dana Professor 
of Religion. A B. (Davidson), B.D. (Louisville Seminary), 
Ph.D. (Duke) 



MERLYN D. SCHOH. Assistant Professor of Cfiemistry, 
B.A. (South Dakota). Ph.D. (Indiana) 



DAVID EMORY SHI. Assistant Professor of History. B A 
(Furman), M.A., Ph.D. (Virginia) 



THOMAS A. ROGERSON. Assistant Professor of Span 
Ish. A B (Queens. NY). MA. (Wisconsin) 



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CLARK G. ROSS, Assistant Professor of Economics. 
B.A (Pennsylvania), Pfi.D. (Boston College) 

J. HARRIS PROCTOR. Charles A Dana Professor of 
Political Science. AS (Duke). MA (Fletcher School of 
Law and Diplomacy). Ph D (H<irv<iid| 




JEREMIAH LEE POTNAM. Associate Professor of Biol 
ogy. B.S.. MS. Ph.D. (Texas A & M) 



ROBERT D. ROTH. Assistant Professor of Sociology, 
A.B. (State University of New York), M.A., Ph.D. (Duke) 



Faculty 217 



ALAN SINGERMAN. Visiting Professor of Frencfi, B A JAMES G. SWISHER, Assistant Professor of Music. 
(Ofiio Univ ). M.S., (Indiana Univ.) B.A.. M.Mus. (Yale) 








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iSsaA 



NEIL H. TOUCHET. Assistant Professor of Military Sci MARY THORNBERRY. Assistant Professor of Political 
ence. B.A. (Florida Soutfiern College). M.S. (Florida Insti Science, B.A . MA. (Duke), Ph.D. (Micfiigan). 
tute of Technology). 

JUNIUS BRUTUS STROUD. Professor of Mathematics. 

B.S. (Davidson). M.A.. Ph.D. (Virginia). 





Photos Bring Thomas Fame 



riippinij through the glossy pages of the 
Smithsonian magazine, the readers' eyes are 
instantly drawn to an article with photo 
graphs by Job Thomas. 

Thomas, Assistant Professor of History and 
Director of South Asian Studies, has been 
making slides since 1971 and has approxi 
mately 6500 in his collection While making 
slides, he has travelled to India four times and 
has one of the largest and best individual 
collections in the United States. Several of 
these appeared in the August 1976 issue of 
the Smithsonian. 

Thomas is proud of the magazine and 
keeps a copy in his office. He said the maga- 
zine approached him for slides and paid over 
SI 000 for one of them. Thomas' slide of that 
particular artwork is the clearest there is He 
attributes this to a technique in which he held 
a handkerchief for the flash to avoid glare. 

In addition to his work in the Smithsonian, 
several of Thomas' slides have also been pub 
lished in Gardner's History of Art and in other 
publications as well. 

Using a Pentax camera and a tripod when 
ever possible, Thomas' slides are almost all of 



1. JOB THOMAS. Assistant Professor of History and 
Director of Soutfi Asian Studies. B.A . MA. (University of 
Madras). Pti D (Michigan). 



Indian artworks and monuments. (Although 
Thomas does not photograph people well "be 
cause they constantly move. " he does take 
pictures and slides of his family.) He said that 
each slide "makes the fullest " of what he is 
photographing. "When I compose a picture, I 
know exactly what I want in it, he explained 
Sometimes Thomas' slides are the only exist 
ing records of paintings that have been lost 

Thomas became interested in making 
slides while he was the curator of art at the 
Madras Museum. For two years he changed 
the exhibitions so that there was always 
something new. 

For each slide Thomas knows the "date, 
number, and everything because I made 
them," he said. He continually uses these 
slides in his art history courses. According to 
Thomas, each lecture and each year are 
unique because he strengthens his lectures 
each time with new slides. 

Thomas is presently involved with helping 
to start a "unit of visual resources" at New 
Delhi. Before, he said, photographs, slides, 
films and maps of India were all scattered 
However, the resource center should improve 
this. 

Although Thomas' collection is tremen 
dous already, he said he plans to continue to 
take slides. It's something "1 never get tired 
of," he added. 

Frances Palmer 




CATHERINE SLAWYSaTTON. Professor of French, 
B.A.. MA. (University of Nice). M.A., Ph.D. (Indiana). 



HOMER SUTTON. Assistant Professor of French, B.A. 
(Davidson), PhD (Indiana Univ.) 



LANCE KEITH STELL. Assistant Professor of Philos 
ophy, B.A (Hope). M.A., Ph.D. (Michigan). 



Faculty 219 



RUSS C. WARREN. Instructor in Art. B.F.A, (New Mexi- 
co), M.FA. (Texas-San Antonio). 



LOCKE WHITE. JR.. Professor of Physics, B.S. (David 
son). Pfi.D, (U.N.C. Chapel Hill). 



WILMER HAYDEN WELSH. Professor of Music. B.S. 
(Johns Hopl<ins). B.Mus., M.Mus., Artist's Diploma (Pea- 
body Conservatory). 





ALBERT ALLEN WOLF. Associate Professor of Physics. 
A.B.. M.A. (Vanderbilt). Ph.D. (Georgia Institute of Tech 
nology). 

JULiaS SHERMAN WINKLER. Associate Professor of 
German, A.B (Ohio Wesleyan), M.A., Ph.D. (Princeton). 



220 PEOPLE 



PETER J. VENTORELLI. Ass 

gy. A B (Illinois State Univ ) 



itant Professor of Sociolo 




^W /^ 




W. TATE WHITMAN. Distinguished Visiting Professor of HALLAM WALKER. Professor of Frencfi. AB. MA, 
Economics, A B,. MA Pfi.D. (Duke) Ph.D. (Princeton) 




Old Soldiers Never Die — 
They Go On To Teach German 



German professor Erich Wruck is a colorful 
character with a variety of interests and 
skills. A popular misconception has attached 
itself to him somehow, however, which can 
now be cleared up: He did not really fight on 
both sides of the war. He fought in the Ger- 
man navy in World War II, but, although he 
was drafted here in 1952, he has never fought 
for the United States. When asked about this, 
he laughed, "I would say I'm normal." To- 
day, he is very much involved with the U.S. 
Army, in which he holds the rank of Colonel. 
In the summers he works for the Pentagon in 
Plans and Operations doing what he calls 
"top secret stuff." 

When asked what he does outside of his 
job, he replied, "What don't I do?" He is an 
architect and a builder. He built his house and 
has been working on a utility house in his 



ERICH-OSKAR JOACHIM SIEGFRIED WROCK. Assoc! 
ate Professor of German, A.B., MA., Pfi.D. (Rutgers). 



back yard for the past five years. He has 
many interests. "Whenever anybody chal 
lenges me, I'm a typical Prussian; I take the 
challenge." One thing that he is interested in 
is flying. He started flying in Germany at age 
fourteen and had his international pilots li- 
cense at sixteen. Most of his flying was done 
in soaring planes, which are like gliders. 
"Soaring is unbelievable," he says. "That's 
one of my sins — flying. " As much exper- 
ience as he has had with planes, there is still 
one aspect of flying with which he has no 
experience, and that is parachuting. However, 
he says, there's still time for that yet. 

As for the future? Dr. Wruck says. "I should 
be painting. When I'm done with everything, 
I'm going to start painting again." 

-Caroline Boudreau 



Faculty 221 



The New Kids In Town 



"Pack up your tears and go. 
Driving off, waving slow. 
Bye-bye, Mommy." 

This first line of a song performed by the 
girls of Fourth Richardson in the Freshman 
Talent Show expressed the feelings of many 
freshman as they watched their parents leave 
for home, This sentiment, however, did not 
last long. 

September 6 marl<ed the beginning of a 
busy, hectic week of meetings mixers, games, 
and lack of sleep that made up Freshman 
Orientation. 

On arriving at Davidson, nervous and anx- 
ious freshman were checked in at the (Jnion. 
Greetings from several upperclassmen such 
as "I'm going to give you your first Davidson 
kiss," eased nerves and got a few chuckles as 
upperclassmen handed freshman a Hershey's 
kiss. Freshman picked up room-keys, sheets, 
meal cards, and bike or car registrations. 
Then they had pictures made for their I.D.'s. 
Many freshman were then faced with an early 
taste of academics as they took placement 
tests in Chemistry or foreign languages. 

Excitement began to build as the new stu- 
dents met their roommates and got to know 
the person they would be living with for the 
next year. The moving of trunk after trunk, 
suitcase after suitcase, and box after box, 
began to get tiresome as the long job of un 
packing and moving in progressed. 

Students quickly learned their way around 
to the dorms, the Gnion, the library, and 
Chambers. Tours were given for those stu- 



dents and parents who were visiting the Col- 
lege for the first time. 

Soon after parents left for home, the fresh 
man were barraged with numerous lectures 
and meetings on the Honor Code, ROTC, 
freshman advisors, ect. Even though these 
posed possible disillusionment, students soon 
learned what college life entailed. 

Outside of the meetings, the new students 
learned about college social life. They began 
trying to make some sense of matching 
names and faces. There were toga mixers, 
daquiri mixers, "my tie" mixers and even a 
few plain old mixers. But at the "mixer of all 
mixers," the People Hunt, confusion reigned. 
Older students yelling "Whose mother wears 
army boots?" and "Whose father is a lumber 
jack?" were soon distinguished from "real" 
freshman. Third Center Belk won the compe- 
tition. 

Afterwards, the freshman formed a hugh 
circle on Chambers' front lawn for a square 
dance. Will Terry called for swinging of part- 
ners, birdies in the cages, do-si-do's and four 
leaf clovers until everyone was hot and tired. 

Halls competed for the first time during the 
Freshman Talent Show when students from 
each class filled Love Auditorium. There were 
chants and cheers from various groups trying 
to demonstrate utmost spirit. The acts ranged 
from serious to funny with singers, instrumen- 
talists, and dances, as well as skits by several 
halls. 

On Saturday, September 13, freshman and 
some upperclassmen flocked to the lake cam- 
Continued on Page 224 








BASEMENT RICH: Front row; Kathy Kooken, Jean Sor Long, Shannon Walters. Back row; Jennifer Spencer, SECOND CENTER BELK HALL COUNSELOR John 
acco. Beth Mack, Betsy Brice, Kim Weiss, Janet Linds Anne Rollins, Nancy Bondurant. Vicky Neale, Karis Spangler keeps his freshman in line 
ley. Caioline Boudreau, Jane Alexania, Meg McArn. Patti Herrnstein. 




AT A PARTY ON FIRST CENTER EAST. Cambria Mel 
Ion and Phred Huber had a very bright time 

TUGOF WAR AT THE FRESHMAN REGATTA proved 
to be a grueling experience for Clark Carter and Jay 
Sleineker 



FIRST RICH: Kneeling: Kathryn Brown, Sharon Bryant. Scragg. Katie Dagenhart. Alison Hall. Sherri Lind. In Tree; 

Rdthel Brown. Lindsey Rader. Dawna Coulant. Lynne Jorgia Rice. Mandy Barber, Sara Ross, Susan Prellyman, 

Folcher. Betsy Blake. Barb Boyce Standing; Wendy Holly Spannuth. Kathleen Huff. Beth Bryant. Laura Hills. 

Noakes. Beth Gerken. Sally Hughes. Suzanne Dickey. Boo Hogan 
Emily Davis. Debbie Hayes. Elizabeth Flanders, Caroline 






V 



Freshmen 223 



DRINKING FROM A URINAL. Hunter Monroe finds Hat 
tie's Night a unique experience. 

SECOND RICH: First Row. Lisa Boardman. Sindy Ay 
cock. Ellen Field. Aubrey Humphries. Tamara Foreman. 
Donna Thompson. Karen Baldwin. Alicia Dewey. Second 
Row: Gabriella Robinson, Cheryl Brooks. Tracy Askew. 
Lauren Van Metre. Peggy Blount. Adelyn Lutz. Sue 
Graves. Julie Cheek. Ester Kim Third Row: Lee Ann 
Stackhouse. Chris Seel. Becky King. Sue Jenney. Cheryl 
Soderstrom. Jane Thompson, Becky Waters. Elizabeth 
Smiley. Sydney Foreman. Margaret Holt. Kathy McCarty. 
Melissa McMannis. Lynn Marie Posey, 





THIRD RICH: First Row Bev Hart, Katherine Finnegan, 
Suzanne Smith. Ann Mitchell. Julie Powell. Susan Stutz. 
Second Row: Julie Abrahms. Cambria Melton, Elizabeth 
Kelley, Gina Overcash. Lynn Powell, Susan Kann, June 
Greer. Third Row Debbie Metzgar. Mary Womble Bar 



inger, Beth Findley. Amy Ashworth. Mary Tabb. Mavin 
Martin. Anne Eliotte. Harriet Gaston Fourth Row: Andrea 
Miller. Debbie Williams. Jennie Barnhart. Sarah Galiley. 
Deborah Schretter. Donna Isles. Fifth Row Vinita Potts- 
darner. Phred Huber. Julie Siton. Jane Harper. 



The New Kids In Town 

pus for the annual Freshman Regatta. On- 
lookers watched freshman on rafts, rubber 
tubes, and kiddie life-preservers try to stay 
afloat. Third Belk East paddled their way to a 
regatta victory. After the regatta, halls com- 
peted in tug-of-war and dizzy lizzie games, that 
resulted in many tired and sandy people. Fi- 
nally, everyone gathered on the grass for ? 
picnic supper. 

Some of the first faculty members that 
freshmen encountered were their faculty advi- 
sors for the year. The advisors met with fresh- 
men during the students' first few days at 
Davidson to distribute schedules and to, 
somewhat, "map out" the direction each stu- 
dent wanted to go while at Davidson, 
Throughout the year, the advisors were avail- 
able for counseling and help with schedulir 
and academic questions. The faculty advisors 
also invited their advisees to their homes sev 
eral times throughout the year for much we 
corned "home cooking." 

In addition to faculty advisors, new stu 
dents were introduced to the freshman advi 
sors, seniors Barb Ashley and Clay MacCau 
lay. The Freshman advisors worked with se 
lecting this year's hall counselors as well a; 
helping to train them. They assisted with or 
entation and tried to initiate good ties betweei 
freshmen and upperclassmen. The advisors 
were also responsible for evaluating hall coun- 
selors. 

One of the biggest adjustments for fresh- 
men was learning to live with someone else 
away from home. Freshmen learned to take 
more responsibility and to budget time. To 
help with roommate relations, freshmen re- 
ceived "Roommate Starter Kits," full of que? 
tions to help roommates get acquainted an 
tips to make the year run more smoothly. 

Eventually, freshmen learned to get them- 
selves up in the morning, to take their clothes 
to the laundry, and to "voluntarily" study. 
Many freshmen had to learn to study all over 
again after a slack senior year, and others just 
learned to study a lot more. The new students 
quickly learned that a review means a test 
and not a preparatory study session. 

But not everyone became so readily adjust 
ed to institutionalized food as they became 
adjusted to studying. For the last year before 
the opening of the new Commons, freshman 
ate at either Bailey House, Richards House, or 
the Union Snack Bar. The new students grew 
accustomed to carrying meal cards at all 
times and standing in line until they could be 
served. Some students doted on the soft ice 
cream down at the houses while others be- 
came "Wildcat Special addicts. 

Continued on Page 226 
I 



224 PEOPLE 






» 



CJP AGAINST FIERCE COMPETITION. Flir^ih^.th Cole 

cn..n h,-l|,s push her hdll s v ■ ! • , , > . , 






^ 4' \ n » 



"'■*'/ .>^-v<^^^^ 




TWO MEMBERS OF THE BLUE RIBBON BOYS 
FRESHMAN REGATTA ENTRY. George Ibrahim and 
Brad McCall, show their interesting apparel 



Freshmen 225 



The New Kids In Town . . . 

During the month of February, freshmen 
had the opportunity to select into a fraternity 
or eating house for next year. This rame after 
hall visitations of the court and individual 
signups for their three top choices. Students 
interested in a particular house were expected 
to meet at least one house officer, to attend 
five house social functions, and to eat three 
meals at the house. 

When self-selection time came, the choices 
indicated that more freshmen than ever 
"shot-gunned" particular houses. There were 
one-hundred-twenty-four freshmen on the 
waiting lists of seven houses and only four 
freshmen on the general waiting list. Emanon 
seemed to be the most popular house with 38 
people on the waiting list followed by Rusk 
with 28 and ETC with 22. PAX was the only 
house that did not meet its quota. 

During this time of the year, the two off- 
campus fraternities, Sig Ep and Fiji, and the 
four court fraternities, PiKA, KA, SAE, and 
Phi Delt began giving oral encourage- 
ments, and began pledging. Many freshmen 
males then began to carry pledge books, to 
display fraternity pledge pins, and to perform 
crazy initiation feats. 

Although freshmen were active in many 
phases of campus life with upperclessmen, 
there wre several all-freshmen activities. 
Many freshmen attended a Halloween cos- 
tume party at Emanon during October and, at 
the end of fall term, a pre-exam party-study 
break in the front of Belk. In March, the ROTC 
department invited the freshman class to 



FINDING A GOOD PLACE TO STUDY and staying 
awake proved to be difficult for Jenny O'Briant, 



make their own sundaes and banana splits. 

Two upperclassmen that were special to 
each hall were the freshmen hall counselors. 
Selected from the rising Junior class, the 
counselors began making preparations early 
for the new freshman class. Hall counselors 
served many purposes: offerers of advice, 
givers of directions, planners of parties, shoul- 
ders for crying, and ears to complain or sirr- 
ply to talk to. 

But one of the best aspects of being a fresh- 
man was being part of the Freshman Hall. 
Although each new student met seemingly 
millions of people, there were around 25 

Fourth Rich: (First Row) Courtney Hall. Leslie Bryan. Lisa 
Harbottle, Lucy Phillips. (Sitting) Kathy Bray, Carole Jol- 
ly. Frances Palmer, Rives Balcom, Mary Fant. (Standing) 
Beth Clore. Carter Vest. Elizabeth Coleman. Keila Sant 
anna, Laura Johnson, Stephanie Moffett. Lisa Smith. Cur 



names that would stick in the minds of hall 
members for many years to come. Students 
learned to interact with hall-mates in social, 
academic, and maturing aspects of life at Da- 
vidson. Halls learned to get along with other 
halls through parties, mixers, and intramural 
competition. 

Basement Richardson-The Bottom Line 

The smallest freshmen girls hall was under 
the direction of Jean Soracco and Patto Long. 
The "Bottom Liners" had intramural teams in 
flickerball, basketball, Softball, and volleyball. 

The hall is proud of the fact that at the 

lin Reed, Jane Redd, Stephanie Bruck. Cathy Rich. Anne 
Goodwin. (2nd row) Margaret Ervin, Mary Legerton. 
Monica Gorham. Andrea Geyer, Lisa Klahn, Eileen Ben- 
ner. Beth Geiger 




^" ^f Til .w 1 




Freshman Regatta, they beat Basement Belk 
in the tugof war competition. They had an 
invite your roommate a date Halloween party 
at Erwin Lodge They decorated a Christmas 
tree in the lounge, and they had a Love Boat 
party on Valentines Day, complete with pink 
champagne. 

The girls converted a hall storage room into 
a lounge area and finished it with an extra 
bed. bean bag chairs and boxes. 

On Thursdays at 5:00. the hall sponsored 
their own Thursday Afternoon Club. The get- 
together was usually some variation on a 
wine and cheese party. A different room host 
ed the party each week, and for several weeks 



AFTER A GRUELING GAME OF BASKETBALL 

Rjtt hford dfitl tfiends t onsume mdbsive qudntitics of 
beet and spdghelli at the infamous Fi)i spaghetti dinner 



they would invite a few professors 

The hall is known for their dance routine to 
"Temptation Eyes," for ice fights, and for 
making popcorn almost every night. 

First Richardson-Filthy Rich 

These girls get a lot of traffic because of 
their location But this made it possible to 
have a lot of "impromptu fun." 

Their flickerball highlight came when they 
made their only first down. Yet the team still 
made it to the semifinals. They said they 
would have been "awesome" in basketball, 
but they forgot to turn in their roster. Their 
motto was "We Play Dirty." Girls on the hal 



were also members of the field hockey, bas- 
ketball, track, sailing, and soccer teams First 
Richardson was proud that they were the 
girls' winners of the Freshman Regatta 

The girls are "sisters" to the guys on 1st 
East and 1st Center East. Their hall counsel 
ors are Barbara "Bootsie" Boyce and Kathryn 
"KB." Brown. 

Continued on page 228 




uud 4I;m4l:i 



BASEMENT BELK: (upnghtl I heo Wright Cuvler ^at tis Northrup, bcolt Redding. John Bieidensline. Don 

ton. Bill Hay. Greg Sloop. Rene Herlong. Bob Miller. Ri ScotI Andy Rock. John Grahann. Brad Uline. Dave Fry- 

chie Willis. Dan Voorhis. Bobby Winston. Phil Harry, Dan man. Randy Sellers 
Blood, (upsidedown) Willie Shelby. John Ferguson. Cur 



Freshmen 227 



The New Kids In Town 




They were known for daiquiri parties and 
being able to consume "massive quantities" 
of food, thus keeping the Peregrine delivery 
service in business. They also watched soap 
operas in the lounge each afternoon, and had 
a 5;30 M'A'S'H club. Strains of Jimmy Buffet 
and James Taylor were often emitted from 
this hall. 

Second Richardson-The Aphrodites 

This hall was proud of the fact that they 
had several girls who played on varsity teams 
such as cross-country and tennis. At the 
Freshman Cake race, the most girl winners 
were from 2nd. 

STUDY BREAKS, such as watching television, offer a 
welcome relief from academia, Sloan Warner finds his 
escape in the lounge of Belk dorm. 



They had several parties and mixers 
throughout the year. A favorite mixer was 
held Mafia style at Rusk and later in the year 
they had a Valentine's party at Rusk. The girls 
felt they had a successful crush party, and in 
March they held an Open House for the facul 

ty. 

Although their flickerball team did not win 
any games, the highlight was when they 
scored. However, they never got more than 
14 points in one game. 

The hall went as a group to Laura's and 
LaStrada's during the year, and as a service 
project, helped to clean up the Child Abuse 
Center in Charlotte. 

Margaret Holt and Lee Ann Stackhouse 
were the hall counselors. 

Continued on page 230 




^.A 



^ / ¥ 



FIRST BELK EAST: (Front group) Peter Burr. Keith Ellis. 
Jim Cheek, (Middle group) Ron Schumer. Rob Spaugh. 
Gary Schenk, John league. Bob Hopkins. (Back Row) 
Dave Earnhardt. Bill Shreve. Frank Ivey. Doug Ammar. 
Bill Satlerwhite. Wes Haynes. David West. Dwayne Lett. 
Jim Trotter John Collinsworth 

THREE-CHEESE BAGELS are a Davidson delicacy from 
the Snack Bar Freshman Leslie Bryan has purchased 
one of the estimated 350 bagels sold at the Snack Bar 
weekly 



228 PEOPLE 



V 





hLICKtRBALL FOLLIES Hdllmdli-s Monica Gor 

lum. Cdlhy Rich, jnd Marqafel Ervin team up for the fall 
sport 

BOSOM BUDDIES Rives Balcom and Cathy Bray enjoy 
spirits and sonq at the Spring Pika Dream Girl party. 



' 'try* .- '• ^f'.J 




S!!SS£fBSS5R5SSSSSSS52BRSSklmiMli>i'f'i'f'r«#^SP*S!SES*" 




FIRST BELK CENTER-EAST: (Front row) Chuck Elyea. Howie Wilkins. Steve King. Steve Reardon. Mark Tully. MONSTEROUS MOUTHFUL^ vrf^'j^'nana^tol" at 
Jeff Currier. Jeff Wall. Jeff Mann. James Moore. John Richard Tapp. Chris Roberts. Scot Myers metz paaakes ,n a portion of the 75 foot banana split at 

Niepold. Jeff Bauschlicher. (Back row) Hugh Floyd. 



Spring Frolics 



Freshmen 229 



The New Kids In Town 

Third Richardson-3 For All 

The girls on 3rd Richardson considered 
themselves a friendly hall. As a very service- 
oriented hall, these girls had the greatest num- 
ber of people on a hall to help with the Y- 
cleanup, and they won the blood drive. 

The hall hosted a Fondu Crush Party, a 
champagne party, and a Valentine's Day mix- 
er during the year. 

Led by hall counselors Donna lies and Deb- 
bie Metzger, the hall was well-known for its 
elaborate decorations during the Christmas 



DEFIANT STANCE; Tamara Foreman socializes with the 
other girls on her second Richardson hall. 




.4!?^t 



season. The girls also won the cheering con- 
test at the first home football game. 

Fourth Richardson-The Fourmidables 

Dubbed by the Brickbrothers and Dough- 
boys as the Amazons, the fourth floor demon- 
strated their athletic ability by winning the 
girls flickerball championship. The team was 
famous for its bandanas and warm-up exer- 
cises. 

They never lost a game, and retained a 
"virgin defense" (never scored on). The high- 
light came on beating the senior team, the 
Rowdies, in the championship. The hall also 
had teams in basketball, softball, and volley- 
ball. 

Primarily considered the party hall by the 
rest of the campus, fourth was the location 
for many impromptu parties and raids. The 
prospect of a keg hastened the return of hall 
members from Spring Break. Fourth was also 
the location for the SAE mudslides, gagged 
and bound males with birthdays, and even a 
visiting mummy. 

The hall had a very successful Late Mew 
Year's Eve party in January at Rusk with 
dancing and refreshments. Later in the year, 
the hall had another spur-of-the-moment party 
at Rusk. 

The girls made several trips to Peregrine as 
well as trips to King of Pizza in Mooresville, 
and Laura's Rozelle House. The hall spent one 
weekend at a mountain cabin in Virginia. 

Cinder the watchful eye of hall counselors 
Lisa Harbottle and Lucy Phillips, the girls 
were famous for their Charlie Brown Theme 
song, popcorn late at night, and delivery or- 
ders from Peregrine. 

Continued on page 232 
ALTERNATIVE HOUSING: Freshman Frances Palmer 
sets up a tent in protest to the shortage of housing that 
forced many freshmen to find rooms off-campus for next 
year. 




CHEEK-A-PEEK: Julie Cheek enjoys the amusement 
that the Freshman Hall experience provides. 



f 



1 X 







FIRST BELK CENTER WEST: (Seated) Malcolm Camp (Back row) Mark Adams. Dennis Swearengin. Rick 
bell, Phillip Crowder. Pat Donley. Greg Sloop, Brian Brost; Gaines. Dick Richards, George Booth, Stuart Dorsett, 
(Second row) Warner Sloan, Neil Sondov. David Gaston; Jason Ratterree 



i0 




GO FOR FOUR Elizabeth Kelly issues instiuclions to 
her roommate at the Freshman housing lottery during 
Spring term 




FIRST BELK WEST: (Front row) Eric Crum. Burt Taylor, 
David Lee. John Thomas. Stewart Deck. (Back row) Dun 
bar Ivy. Nelson Westerhout. Warren Overbey, Bill Hall, 



Tate Nichols. Chip Fishback. Brad Perkins. Carl Rist. 
Terry Kurts, Bill Crone. Hap Royster. Joe Calvin. 



/ 




SECOND BELK EAST: (Front row) Tom Hermon, Clarke Carter. Sam Hay. (Third row) Dave Hessler. 

Pete Astapchick. Carl Anderson. Jay Steineker, Philip Gerdes. Jay Toslosky. Scott Otto. Richard 

Todd Beck, (Second row) George Thompson. Marc DuBose. John Bradham. Fred Ehrman. (Fourth row) 

Fields. Nevins Todd, Keng Soon Lim. Lentz Ivey. Bill Cobb. Clay Johnson. Dick Lee. Dick Lee. Jim 

Santa, Rick Peek, Mark Whalen. Sanders Dallas, Walcott, Bobby Silver 





SHARING HIS TALENTS. Earl Wooten performs for a program 
sponsored by the Black Student Coalition for Black History Week. 



Phihp Alter 
Carl Anderson 
Shannon Anderson 
Tracy Askew 
Sindy Aycock 
Brooks Babcock 
Karen Baldwin 



Mary Womble Eiarringer 



S'^iSl 



Michael Blake 
Peggy Blount 



Greg Bounds 

Kay Boyd 

Tim Boyer 

Ka(hy Bray 

John Breidenstine 



Betsy Brice 

Cheryl Brooks 

Rachel Brown 

Anthony Broyles 

Bob Bruce 



Stephanie Bruck 

Leslie Bryan 

Sharon Bryant 

Peter Burr 

Malcolm Cambell 



Clark Carter 

Julie Che«k 

Elizabeth Clore 

John Collingsworth 

Lanny Conley 




MONCH THE DAY AWAY. Lisa Smith enjoys a potato chip break 
on the Union patio 



The New Kids In Town . . . 

Basement Belk — Much Later 

Randy Sellers and Steve Shelby were the 
hall counselors for the basement. They 
were known for their rowdy athletes. The 
hall made a project of painting their 
lounge. They also built a bar for it. 

Their parties included an Ice Cream So- 
cial, a lake party, and a Mew Years Eve 
Party in December. 

Although the hall did not have a sue 
cessful flickerball team, they excelled in 
basketball. The hall became the IMAC 
champions for the B League teams. 

First East Belk — The First East Beasts 

Known for "Power Pooing" and Beer 
hunter. First East was led by hall counsel 
ors Jim Cheek and John Teague. 

This hall mixed mostly with first Rich 
and kept a constant battle going with the 
girls in Basement Cannon. 

The First East Beasts suffered a memo- 
rable defeat at the hands of the KA's. The 
hall also had both A and B League basket 
ball teams. 



The hall boasted the only submarine in 
the freshman regatta, of "doing Hat," and 
of getting psyched by listening at "Blow 
Fly." 

First Center East Belk — Get Rich Quick 
This hall showed early spirit by winning 

the banner at the first home football game. 

Their motto was "We party a lot." 

Throughout the year they had a daiquiri 

party, a get-your roomate-a-date party, and 

a hall Christmas party. Led by Terry Wade 



and Jeff Wall, the hall took a tubing trip at 
Nantahala 

First Center West Belk — FQII 

"We're very mellow and laid back," one 
member of 1st Center West ventured. A 
truer description might t>e "apathetic." 
Led by hall counselors Rick "The Greek 
Ideal" Gaines and "Statuatory" Stuart Dor- 
sett, the hall is 

Continued on page 234 




Sandefs Dallas 
Willw Oavid 
Emily Davis 
Stewan Deck 
Alicia DF»ey 
Suiann« Dickey 



Richard DuBo«e 
Lindsey Durway 
John Efllin 
Fred Ehrman 




SECOND BELK CENTER: (Front row) John Spangler, Sawhney, Mark Nottingham. Will Donovan, Eric Fink, 

Mills Antley. Chris Woods. Willie David. Mac Whitesides. Jim Hoskins. Philip Alter, David Barnes. Ralph Taylor, 

Stephen Skelton. Kevin Esposito. (Back row) Lanny Kon Ken Howarth. David Lincoln, 
ley. Steve Dick, David Tiers. David Hutchinson. Deepak 



AT BILL BOLDING'S MERCY. Rives Balcom. Suzanne Dickey, 
and Elizabeth Coleman await their fate in the Housing Lottery. 



Freshmen 233 



The New Kids In Town 




famous for the "Damnit, Janet" signs each 
morning in Donley and Malcolm Campbell's 
room, and Dennis "Flash" Swearengin's 
clothes ("Colors not found in nature"). 

Although the hall did not have an outstand 
ing flickerball team — winning only two 
games, they are very big on Dungeons and 
Dragons. A basketball highlight for them was 
when they won a game by only one point. 

A M'A'S'H mixer was cohosted by 1st 
Center West and held at PAX The house was 
decorated with a parachute from the ROTC 
department, and guests come dressed in fa 
tigues, surgical suits, and other appropriate 
apparel. 
First Belk WestSkippy's All-Stars 

SECOND BELK WEST: (Seated) Jim Troutman. Tom 
Leonard. Charlie Lovett. Roy Martin. Charles Wiley. Jim 
Mashburn, Bob Tate. Jeff Holland. Dan Metzel. (Standing) 
Jeff Trawick. Paul Fry, Jeff Knudson, Tony Broyles. Tom 
Walker. Tom Ratchford. Clark Hantzmon, Bryan Zie- 
linski. Chip McMichael. Leon Mason. Hunter Monroe. 
Keith Martin. Bill Allibone, Bob Finch. Mike Blake. Rob 
Gillison 



Jeff Holland 


Pau 


Hopgood 


Robe 


1 Hopkins 


Ji 


Ti Hoskins 


Ke 


n Howarth 


Ka 


hieen Huff 


Sally Hughes 


Aubrey 


fumpfifies 


David 


lulchinson 




Robert lies 







FRISBEE FANATIC Jeff Holland participates in the rapidly-growing 
sport of Frisbee on the front lawn of Chambers. 



234 PEOPLE 



Eric Crum and Warren Overbey were the 
hall counselors for 1st West The hall had 
intramural teams in softball. B League basket 
ball, and flickerball team "had a lot of talent" 
but lost early in the tournament. They did, 
however, score three times on the champion 
team. 

Of the various parties throughout tht- yeiir 
the hall particularly remembers their Toi)ii 
Party and the M'A'S'H mixer 

The hall is known for coming in 2nd plat e 
in the Phi Delt air guitar contest, streaking 
bodies, and "the new boy on the hall" and the 
bird seed attack by Basement Rich, 

Yvette, Vicki, and Beth are the hall's grou 
pies. 

Second East Belk-Bushwhackers 

According to the Bushwhackers, their hall 
was known for writing on the walls. This is 
where we found their history. 

The hall participated in several mixers 
throughout the year. One was a daiquiri party 
with 4th Richardson and another mixer with 
some Queenies which was held at the Fiji 
house. This hall reported that favorite activi- 
ties were waking up each other in the middle 
of the night, playing basketball with a small 
foam basketball, and throwing each other into 
the shower (not necessarily on special occa 
sions either). The hall counselors were Marc 
Fields and Nevins Todd. 

Second Center Belk-The Ambassadors 

This hall considered themselves a diverse, 
conglomerate, non stereotypical hall. "Were 
just great guys," one member said. According 
to the hall members, there was a problem 
with getting the hall to participate. The guys 
preferred to do things independently. 

Although they did not consider themselves 

a partying hall, they did have several mixers. 

Continute on page 236 



THIRD BELK EAST: (Front row) Jim Pollard. Eric 
Hill, Mahmoud Sayani. Mark Stanback. Rob lies. Dan 
Turk, Jim Morgan, (Second row) Gary Sladcik. Dave 
Klett, Scott Beaver. Steve Soud, Fred the dog. Randy 
Stroud. Mott McDonald, John Vassos. Alan Rosier, 




,•• Johnton 
',lr Jolly 



tbelh Kelly 



Maiy LF«r>Ion 
Tom Leonard 
Keng Soon Lim 
Shetri Lind 
Janet Lindtley 



Dhn Lyday 
MKy McCatty 



Jeff l>\ann 
Roy Martin 



Greg Kash, Mike Smith, (Back row) John Van Dell. 
Mark Goodwin. Tom Franz, John Malone, Thomas 
Tankersley, Bryan Sloan, Jimmy Kinsey, Tom His 
sam, Barry Mack 



Freshmen 235 



The New Kids In Town 



Their favorites were those held at the lake 
campus. This group was led by hall counsel- 
ors Ralph Raylor and John Spangler. 

Second West Belk — The All-Meat Boys 

This hall, led by Rob Gillison and Jim Trout- 
man, was known for their spontaneous show 
ers and their filthy poets. One highlight in the 
hall's flickerball career occurred when they 
almost beat Hurtin' For Certain, the number 
one ranked team. The hall consisted of a vari- 
ety of golfers, swimmers, and football play- 
ers. 



Kelly Moofe 

Vickie Neale 

Tale Nichols 

John Njepold 

Wendy hoakes 



Third East Belk — Coming East 

This hall considered themselves to be van 
dais. According to the hall members, Richard 
son hated them because of their reputation as 
the "Phone Callers. " 

"Coming East " was proud of winning the 
Freshman Regatta and for being the second 
place flickerball team. The hall also had a B 
League basketball team. Barry Mack and 
Mott McDonald were the hall counselors. 

Third Center Belk — The Blue Ribbon Boys 

The Blue Ribbon Boys considered their Peo- 




ple Hunt victory their big claim to fame. The 
hall counselors were Bill Purcell and Steve 
Carter. 

Although there is no official record, their 
flickerball team felt they must have set a 
school IMAC record for the worst scores; this 
came after the SAEs defeated them 94-0. 
They also had basketball and softball teams. 

The hall was remembered for their entrant 
in the Freshman Regatta. Hall members wore 
kiddie bibs, shower caps, and kiddie inter- 
tubes. They then tied themselves together 
with rope. 

Funny incidents occurred when the halls 
stole toilet seats, shower heads, and shower 
curtains from every bathroom in Richardson. 
Chip Lyerly will be rememberd for "8-ironing" 
to death the mouse that had been living under 
their hall counselor's refrigerator. 

Third West Belk — The Knight of the Red 
Room 

Led by Ed Goode and Mick Viest, this hall 
was known for "Conversations with Junior," 
The Red Room, and stall wars. 

The hall had IMAC teams including a B- 
League basketball team. Despite their partici- 
pation in the sports program, they said that 
they were last in everything — everything 
except partying, that is. During the Christmas 
season, the hall had an open mixer. Refresh- 
ments included a trash can full of Christmas 
spirits. 

-Frances Palmer 

BLOWING THE WHISTLE Or^ VICTORY: Clay Macau 
lay signals the win for 3rd Rich in the Tug of War. 



THIRD BELK CENTER: (Seated) Jeb Benedict. Ed 
Daugherty. Lindsey Durway, George Ibrahim, Matt Mer- 
rell, Steve Carter, Chip Lyerly. Rob Johnson, Brooks 
Babcock. Scott Powers, Russ Summerell (Standing) Bill 
Purcell. Jim Cox. William Bynum. Chris Roberts. Brad 



236 PEOPLE 



McCal, Will Abberger. Jeff Tyler. Andy Scott. Steve 
Giles, Phallus, George Strickland, Drew Wells. Mike Mar 
bert. Dave Hall. John Ruppenthal, Chris Gunn. William 
Stroud. 





fi 




AM 1 » 






Eiilliii 



PSE2E"^H 



(') 









Jant Redd 
S<oll Redding 

P . ridrd Richdrd^ 

.-.rl R.U 

N 1^ Rotw'is 
,oti<iHla Robinion 
L,nf^ RoQKh 
Annr Rotlmt 
Alan Rmirr 
S«ia Ro» 
Hap Royklpi 
Bill Sailrrwhttr 
O«p>0k Sawhney 
Gary Schenk 
Deborah Schretler 
Ronald Schumer 
Cfl»oJine ScraM 

William ShrevF 

tiobb^ Silver 
Stephen Shell on 
ijfegofy Skx>p 
Lliiabeth Smtley 
Eliiabelh Smith 

Suiann Smith 
Cheryl Sonderstrofr 
Rob Spauqh 
Jennifer SperKet 
Mark Stanback 
George SlncklarvJ 
Randall Sloud 
William Stroud Jr 



frell 



Dennis Swearengtn 
Mary Tabb 
Thomas Tankersley 
Richard Tapp 
Donna Thompson 
George Thompson 
Jane Thompson 
Jeff Tilbury 
Carl Tolberi 
Jay Toslosky 
Mafk Tulty 



;t Turn. 
' Tyler 



John Vandell 



Stephen 

Ben W.I 
Debby ' 



THIRD BELK WEST: (Front Row) Ed Goode. Robbie 
Pool. John Eglin. Mick Viest. (Second Row) Jay Nor 
man, Paul Turner, Grier Harris. Stuart Cauley. Tim 
Law. Pat Woodward, A Ground Crew member. John 



Hendrix (Third Row) Tom Okel. James Jones. Jerry 
Cook, Jerry Grubba. Grant Grantham. Grand Archan. 
John Hartman. Peter Jannetla, Tommy Kirk. Freddy 
Butler. Jeff Tilbury. Minor Hinson. 




Freshmen 237 




SOPHOMORES Suffer Slumping Symptoms 



It's winter term, it's raining outside, I've 
just consumed a bag of potato chips, two "big 
wheels" and a roll of cookie dough (by my- 
self), I have three tests and two papers due 
tomorrow, I don't have a major, a date for 
Friday night or a place to sleep tonight. And 
all my friends hate me. I think I'm going in 
sane!!! 

"What's the matter with me?" I cried to my 
good friend, Caroline. "You have Sophomore 
Slump," she said," Go ask Chris and Liz 
about it, they're experts." 

So I tropped down to the basement of Can- 
non in search of a diagnosis. When I walked 
in, I found Chris writing a suicide note on the 
pipes on their ceiling and Liz was climbing out 
through the window (they use it as a door). In 
desperation I cried, "Help me, I have Sopho- 
more Slump!" Then I collapsed on their floor. 

As I came to, I heard Liz saying, "Poor girl, 
she's caught it too. We should have spotted it 
sooner; she has all the symptoms. " 

238 PEOPLE 



"Lack of motivation. " 

"Transferitis." 
"Constant complaining." 

"Boredom." 
"Weirdness." 

"Tears." 
"Yeah, kind of like a second puberty. " 
concluded Chris. 

"Don't worry," said Liz. "You're normal. 
Just go play racquetbail, or go shopping or go 
tear up your Humes books. Do something to 
cheer yourself up." 

"Yeah," continued Chris, "just do some 
thing to get your mind off of it. And don't 
worry, everybody has it. You'd be surprised, 
just ask." 

As I climbed the stairs back to my room, 1 
passed neighbor (sophomore philosophy ma 
jor) Karrie. "Karrie, " I said. "Do you have 
Sophomore Slump?" I eagerly awaited an em- 
pathetic horror story. 

"Sophomore Slump? There's no such 



thing. You can call it what you want, but it 
sounds like an excuse for someone who 
caught laziness as a virus. Why? Is someone 
complaining of it?" 

"No one I know, " I quipped. Tve just 
heard rumors. " 

"Well, see ya," Karrie said as she walked 
out the door. 

"Yeah, see ya," I returned (with false gai- 
ety). Then I walked back to Liz and Chris' 
room to join the shaving cream fight I hedrd 
brewing. After all, misery loves company. 
Join us, won't you? 

-Tracy Thompson 

AN OVERDOSE of the Library is one of tfie major causes 
for tfie dreaded Sophiomore Slump If thie number of book 
volumes is any indication of the severity of the strain. 
True Davis and Kim Scott n-iay be headed for a bad case 
of the disease. 



SOPHOMORES 




SNOOZING IS the ageold method of dealing with the 
Sophomore doldrums, as Chris Gauch demonstrates 




■a yi^i 



Craig Adams 
Trig Adams 
Mike Allan 




Sherman Allen 
Wade Anderson 
Geoff Andrews 



Kevin Altar 
Mebane Atwood 
Doug Austin 




Eddie Aziz 
Brenda Baker 
Brent Baker 



W^ 



A! Baldwin 
Bill Bankhead 
Bill Barber 




All^^ tt^fe 




Paul Baynard 
Beth Been 
Lindsay Biddle 






James Biggers 
John Blackman 
Lyn Bolen 



Sophomores 239 



David Boone 

Cathey Best 

Wendy Boulware 

Dick Bourne 

Robbie Brannen 

Elizabeth Brazell 



Frank Bright 

Fred Broadwell 

Tim Brotherton 

Jim Brown 

Jimmy Brown 

Linda Brown 



Dave Bruns 
Bob Buchanan 
Sue Buchanan 
Karrie Buckner 
James Bullock 

Mark Burris 



Laura Bush 
Scott Campbell 
Kathy Canlwell 
David Carpenter 
Mary Carpenter 
David Carr 




SiSg-W* ■ " ■* . ' ^- '--ji fe^,V-<--'J_^ 









Club Sports Take Root 



Although they enjoy little support from the 
campus as a whole, club sports are popular 
and rewarding for those involved. Club Sports 
Council President Alec Driskill reports eleven 
teams chartered by the Council, from football 
to water polo. Club sports must be organized 
and run totally on their own for the first year, 
then they may submit a budget to the Activi 
ties Tax Council for approval for the next 
year. 

The Riding Club is an example of one club 
which is newly organized and has just joined 
the Council. Co-organizers Ann Williams and 
Lyn Bolen say they are still in the "formative 
stages," but they have high hopes for the 
riding program. This year they entered two 
InterCollegiate shows as a team, and they 
plan on hosting shows in the future. 

Men's Club Tennis was a year around sport 
this year as the seven member team played 
tournaments in the fall and matches spring 
term against area college teams. Their record 
was 2-9, with victories over Catawba and 
(J. S.C. -Lancaster. According to Coach-player 
"Flex" Davis, the highlight of the year is the 
"annual overnight match against Chapel Hill 
and Duke (with much partying)." Davis 
praised all the players for their "hard work" 
but singled out player Dave Hessler for the 
distinction of "Least V'aluable Player." 

Another popular fall sport is Women's Vol 



leyball. Co-Captains Sandra Davis and Cathy 
Hodges report that the team played Queens 
College and area high schools and won the 
Intramural Championship for the second 
straight year. Davis is looking forward to a 
successful fall of '81, she says, "about six- 
teen girls are very interested." They hope to 
be coached next fall by Professor Louis Ort- 
mayer. 

Club Council President Driskill described 
La Crosse as the "strongest" club this year. 
Coach-player Alex Evans explains, "Were 
really trying to make it big here. " The Club is 
succeeding in that goal if this past season is 
any indication. They finished 5-3 against Var 
sity teams from such schools as Clemson, 
Guilford and Georgia Tech. Although not rec- 
ognized at Davidson as such, the La Crosse 
team is a member of the G.S. Inter-Collegiate 
La Crosse Association and thus a Varsity 
sport. Evans believes that the team has the 
"talent and interest " to go Varsity at David- 
son. What they, and the other club sports, 
need is wider campus support. 

In addition to Riding, Men's Tennis, Wom- 
an's Volleyball, and La Crosse, there are club 
teams for Football, Rugby, Men's Soccer, 
Women's Soccer, Water Skiing, Water Polo 
and Ice Hockey. 

— Tracy Thompson 

EYEING THE GOAL, Nick Tsantes controls the ball. 




"% 



240 PEOPLE 



SOPHOMORES 



E^JmSi 









iii^Jiltltf& 



yj^sM 














Daie Carln 
Lauid Champlain 
John Chid&ey 
Ellen Churchill 
Cindy Clark 
Nancy Cloyed 



Mark Conner 
Brad Cors 
Jean Covell 
Todd Cowdery 
Ronnie Cox 
Amy Crillenberger 



Marni Crosby 
Chris Culp 
Laura Curry 
Beth Davidson 
Drew Davis 
Richard Davis 



True Davis 
Wall Dean 
Jeff Dempsey 
Brown Dennis 
David Donahower 
Lisa Draine 



Cathy Dumas 
David Dusseault 
Harry Easterling 



Lund Easterling 
Scott Eblin 
Betty Eborn 



John Edwards 
John Eley 
Margaret Evans 



Eric Faires 
Martha Farrar 
J.C- Faulkner 



Sophomores 241 



Denise Ferguson 

Vic Ferrari 

Eric Fichtner 

Alan Fields 

Joanna Fleming 

David Fleming 



Sandy Fssett 

Mike Frankhouser 

Wes French 

Mary Frye 

Roy Fuller 

Jemes Funsten 



Chris Gauch 
Devon Geisz 



Mary Ann Gelly 
Felix Gerdes 



Jonathan Glance 
Mike Goode 



Andre Goodlett 
Ivy Goodman 



Michael Graham 

Flint Gray 

Jama Greene 

Paul Griffith 

Gene Griggs 

Peter Gulyn 



Scott Haight 

Tom Haller 

Kay Ham 

Brian Hamilton 

annon Hamilton 

Derek Harbin 





Library Lunacy 
1:00 A.M. — 8 A.M. 

So what do Davidson students do when the work is piling 
up, there just aren't enough hours in the day, and there isn't 
anywhere that is quiet enough to study? Spend the night in 
the library, that's what! 

Rather than studying in the all-night study room or dorm 
lounge, some students have begun the mini-craze of sleep- 
ing in the library after closing hours. 

The obnoxious buzzer is a warning for some to hide in 
bathrooms or between the aisles rather than a reminder to 
leave before the doors are locked. These hardcore studiers 
(a title to be questioned at times, though) bring in blankets, 
pillows, alarm clocks, munchies, and books and papers. 

Then they begin the long night of studying, writing, or 
dozing. They must, however, be careful not to let the college 
night-watchman see any lights! Some manage to sneak out 
unnoticed in the morning, but others must face the question 
ing of a morning librarian. But, if they got a lot of work done 
or even a good nights' sleep, it's still all worthwhile! 

-France Palmer 



A HARD DAYS NIGHT. Andy Wilson dozes in the library during the after 
hours. Many other students have joined Andy in this late night craze. 



242 PEOPLE 




SOPHOMORES 



tci Hdflan 
Bfdd Hairold 
Florence Haft 
Mdfk Harwirk 
Chuck Hasly 
George Hal field 





Anne Hockett 
Merris Hollingsworth 
Carol Hoopes 
Jim Hooten 
Caryn Hoskins 
Brad Houck 



Kenneth Hovel 
James Hughes 
Linda Hulburl 
Chip Hurley 
Anne Hurl 
Suzanne Mulchings 



Sophomores 243 



Stan Hynds 

Dewayne Jimison 

Leif Johnston 



Tinn Johnston 
Mike Jones 
Peter Jones 



Jeff Jordan 

Jeff Kane 

Eric Kaufmann 



Greg Kaufmann 

Anne Keith 

Michael Kelly 



Will Kendrick 
Natalie Kerr 
Robin Kidd 



Diane King 

Hope King 

William King 

Elizabeth Kiss 

Ken Kneg 

John Krotchko 



Connie Kyle 

Lynn Lackey 

Warren Lackey 

Todd Lambert 

Margaret Lamotte 

Janie Larus 



Sherburne Laughlin 

Steve Lawrence 

Allen Lazenby 

Derek Lee 

Ken Lewis 

Steve Lewis 



244 PEOPLE 




SOPHOMORES 




The 

Expanding 

Facilities 



Students returning in the fall will find them 
selves with three new buildings the Commons 
and two more dorms. Mary Irwin Belk (Irwin) 
and Peter Knox (Knox) dorms will each house 
54 students. Knox will house only men. and 
Irwin will house men on the first floor and 
women on the second. 

CIpperclassmen had the chance to draw for 
one of the new dorms during the lottery held 
in April. All of the rooms are doubles. The 
dorms both have central heat and central air 
conditioning, kitchen facilities, and carpeted 
lounges. The furniture is a wooden loft sys 
tem. 

Another addition to the campus is that of 
the new Commons. Incoming Freshmen and 
various upperclassmen will eat at the Com 
mons which will replace Richards and Bailey 
These two present eating houses will be 
moved. 

The Commons will not only be used for 
regular meals. It will also be used for ban 
quets, large meetings and dances. The college 
will run its own dining service. 

-Frances Palmer 

LOOMING LARGE IN THE MIDST OF PATTERSON 
COURT, the new Commons overshadows the now obse 
lete buildings of Richards and Bailev 




Chuck Lifford 
Mike Lockwood 
Bret Logan 
Eric Long 
Mike Lord 
Bryan Lowe 



John Lusk 
Kim McAlister 
John McCormick 
Lucy McCullough 
Kevin McDaris 
Gary McDonald 



Kirsten McDonald 
John McDowell 
William McFadyen 
Greg McFayden 
Melissa McKeithen 
Rusty McLelland 



Sophomores 245 



Catherine McMillan 

Elizabeth McMillan 

Leesa McPhail 



Paul Mainella 

Arabella Malone 

John Mann 



John Marshall 

Lucy Marshall 

Chris Marshburn 



Hal Martin 

Mike Mason 

Caroline Massey 



Blair Maxwell 

Ridgely Medlin 

Bill Michel 



Stephen Miller 

William Miller 

Leslie Mills 



Yvette Mingo 

Sarah Moody 

Tom Moort- 



Cathy Morell 

Mark Morrison 

Brad Mullis 





SQPHOMORFc; 








Extra- 
curricular 
Earning 

"But Mom, I was watching my expenses 
. . . this two dollar per week allowance is just 
not sufficient, though!" 

Perhaps a little exaggerated, but it never 
theless gets the point across . . everyone 
needs spending money. 

The college offers some job opportunities 
through work study, slater and odd jobs in 
different academic departments. But the pay 
isn't exceptional and most of the work exper 
ience isn't very exciting. So what's an alterna 
tive? Work off campus! 

Within town, the Peregrine House hires the 
greatest number of students of any individual 
employer. It averages about 1518 students 
hired at a time. Other jobs have been landed 
in the shops down town. Sally Hughes enjoys 
her work at the Ark bookstore and Beth Fields 
and Partho Choudbury are pleased with the 
experience they're gaining as bank tellers at 
Piedmont Bank & Trust Co. Other experience 
oriented jobs were found at Blakely Organ Co 
by David Lyons, Frank Myers, Jane Redd and 
John Hartman. Copeland Gallery hired Bara 
bara Kelley and Virginia Evans as picture 
framers and Kim Hulett works as a computer 
programmer for Frank Radar. 

Outside of town are numerous employment 
opportunities at Hardees, 7-11, Ham and 
Eggs, and of course, the Buttery and Beanery. 
Domestic work as household help and baby- 
sitting is also another option to students seek- 
ing some flexible part time work. 

Says Donna lies, employed at B & B for two 
years, "Working off campus is much better 
than jobs on campus. I get paid two times as 
much per hour than work study, my hours 
are very flexible, and it's fun!" 

The opportunities for a little more exper 
ience and a little more money are out there 
just waiting to be captured by the intuitive 
Davidson student. If one needs a little encour- 
agement, Harriet Holshuijsen would be a good 
contact. Harriet played in the short film. Foot- 
steps, filmed at Charlotte's Waxhall during 
April. Not a star yet, they said she had poten 
tial! 

■Ah, off campus employment . . . the pos- 
siblities are limitless! 

-Lisa Sloan 



KEYBOARD KICKBACK: John Hartman at work In Bla 
l<eley's Organbuilder's, earning essential petty cash- 



Sophomores 247 



Kathryn Murray 


'*« 


Bucky Murrell 




Mark Murrey 


i ^' 


Linda Nash 


€' "W^ 


Melisa Nicolaldes 


d. v^ 


Jeff Nielsen 


^- ^^ 




* 


Sarah Nock 


WH^BM 


Laurie Nolo 


RHI^H 


John Ode!! 


n^jH 


Mark Oldenburg 


r-^ 


Ben Oldham 


Mason Olds 


^ 


Erin Orr 


1 


Marvin Overby 


^■v 


Alice Packard 


M m 


Tom Pafford 


m' 'm 


Richard Page 


m ■ M 



Food-Foraging 

One of the greatest reliefs of attaining an 
upperclassman status at Davidson is the thri 
and privilege of taking one's meals at one of 
the many notable establishments surrounding 
Patterson Court (notable here used to suggest 
potable, i.e. not Richards or Bailey). Along 
with this experience, however, comes the in- 
evitable; what to do with one's Saturday 
nights. 

Since the Patterson Court eating houses 
don't serve dinner on Saturdays, their mem- 
bers are forced to find meals in their rooms, 
or, better yet, to go out for dinner. There are 
many places for the discriminating diner to go 
in and around Mooresville and Chailotte, but 
the most popular by far is Western Steer, 
which features great steaks, and salads for 
the dieters. Saturday night at the Steer sees 
long, long lines of Davidson students waiting 
for supper. Other places that get a lot of 
Davidson business on Saturday nights are 
fast-food places like Hardee's or McDonald's, 
the B & B, and, of course, Davidson's own 
Peregrine House. Those willing to make the 
drive to Charlotte often eat at Tuesday's, La 
Strada's, the Red Lobster, and others. Other 
nearby places to grab a bite to eat include 
KoP, Tacos-nBurgers, The Village Cove, or 
our own, beloved Snack Bar. Of course, if you 
don't want to have to worry about waiting in 
any long lines, you can always take a risk at 
Whataburger. 

•Caroline Boudreau 



B & B BACCHANALIA: Norwood Smith. Marshall Well 
born and Frank Clark were spotted dining in the much 
frequented Interstate 115 eatery. 




SOPHOMORES 









William Patterson 
Phihp Per L« 
Ldurd Perry 
Kdlhy Petrea 
Ldura Petrou 
Susan Potlenger 



Albert Potter 
Barry Prine 
Paul Ray 
Jim Reese 
Pam Rew 
I iz Ribadeneyra 



Tim Ritchie 
John Robbins 
Joe Roberts 
loyce Robinson 
Lisa Robinson 
Reaves Robinson 



Tripp Robinson 
Carol Roche 
Malcolm Rogers 
Lorin Roskos 



Tom Roth 
Caroline Rourk 
David Rowe 
Ellen Rowe 



Jeff Sahol 
Eric Sanner 
Danny Sappenfield 
Cliff Savage 



Tom Schember 
Caroline Scott 
Carolyn Scott 
Kim Scott 



William Seel 
Mark Sheffield 
Stephen Shield 
David Shoemaker 



Sophomores 249 



Mitzi Short 

Brad Simpson 

David Simpson 

Laura Singleton 

Joseph Sloop 

Catherine Smith 



John Smith 

[Norwood Smith 

Sandy Smith 

Russell Snipes 

Sam Sommers 

Laurie Soper 



Shawn Stafford 

John Stanback 

Stratton Sterghos 

Steve Stine 

John Stipp 

Kathy Stokes 



Lance Stokes 

Rocky Stone 

John Storey 

Dave Stosur 

hancy Stoudt 

Teresa Strawser 



Gordon Stukes 

Garry Sullivan 

David Taylor 

Victor Taylor 

Laura Terry 

Tracy Thompson 



Todd Thomson 

Loy Thornton 

Chris Tie'nan 

Ellis Tinsley 

Beth Toler 

Cliff Tribus 



Nick Tsantes 

Ron Tunkel 

Gordon Tutnbull 

Durand Turner 

Doug Vass 

Danny Waddill 



William Wahl 

Leonard Walker 

Gary Walton 

Steve Ward 

Eric Weiss 

Marshall Wellborn 











m^dt^ 








SOPHOMORES 



£Tr^ 





M.iry^rel West 
Sdia Wheeler 
Edward Whilesides 
Pamela Whitlock 
Stewart Wicker 
Mark Widick 



Crystal Williams 
Elizabeth William 
Kendrick Williami 
Russel Williams 
Elizabeth Wilson 
Dale Withrow 



Ruth Wolf 
Jeanne Womack 
Chff Woodard 
Lisa Young 
Lach Zemp 
Andy Zoulewelle 




Joggers Stampede Davidson 



Jogging, or running as all true joggers refer 
to it, is quite the activity for Davidson stu 
dents who want to slim down, shape-up, re- 
lieve pressure, take a study break, sweat, or 
just enjoy the Davidson scenery. Davidson 
students, and professors, have been seen run- 
ning at 6:30 on a Monday morning, through 
the 11:00 church services at DCPC, during 
Coffee and Cokes and sometimes even 
through Fraternity Band Parties on Saturday 
nights. In other words, at all times of the day 
and night, and whenever they can find the 
time. Most can sympathize with Danny Ar 
mistead when he says that he has to fit his 
running in "around classes, labs, and study- 
ing." But the faithful can always find time to 
pound the pavement or dirt path. 

Those students who like a short, flat run 
will run once around the track, while the more 
ambitious runner will tackle the six miles of 
dogs and hills to the Meat Market and back. 

The cross-country trail is also a good place 
to run — and to be seen. Carie Munn com- 
mented that she notices "many more girls out 



there" spring term. "They realize they've got 
to get in shape for the summer." Munn runs 
the trail often and reports that it is "quite a 
challenge in the dark." The big argument 
among runners is whether or not it is harder 
to run the course "forwards of backwards ' 
(that is from the end to the begining or from 
the beginning to the end), but neither side will 
concede to the other. 

The biggest running days are in early Fall 
or spring, when the sky is blue, the tempera 
ture is cool and the birds are singing; but 
Davidson runners are versatile and will run in 
almost any weather. Tim Ritchie and Frank 
Ivey, among others, were even seen running 
in the snow. Ritchie quips, "We're no fair 
weather runners!" Other Davidson students 
claim to run only when it's sleeting and below 
freezing in June. Still others, however, are like 
Tracy Thompson who notes, "When you live 
on the fourth floor, you don't need to jog!" 
Alas, some have yet to see the light. Maybe 
next year. 

— Marian Hill 



CIRCLING THE TRACK. Davidson runner Robert Teer 
sweats it out and stays in shape Other Davidson runners 
prefer the more rugged crosscountry course 



Sophomores 251 



Mincing Words 



ARA: See Richards and Bailey. 
Big Weekend: The weekend each term which 
people don't rememb>er (or try to forget). 
These are Homecoming, Midwinters, & 
Spring Frolics and feature concerts, parties, 
dances, etc. 

Braire: The social center of Davidson College, 
library. 

Care Package: Goodies from home, prefer- 
ably homemade and edible. Clip this defini- 
tion and send to Mom. 

Chambermaids: Impressive statuary adorn- 
ing Chambers Building in grateful memory of 
the first two co-eds to step on campus in 
1973. 

DCPC: Davidson College Presbyterian Church- 
TCPZ: Dr. T.C. Price Zimmermann — Vice 
President for Academic Affairs. 
HTH: Home Town Honey — the one you left 
behind. 

Humes: The consuming passion of anyone 
taking Humanities; the most boring topic of 
conversation for anyone who isn't. 
Mixer: In large room place 25 men and 25 
women. Add music, refreshments, and fun. 
Mix well. Yield: Instant Party (serves 50). 
900 Room: Back in 1886, 900 people were 
arrested in this notorious campus night spot 
for loud singing and indecent exposure. Since 
then these activities have been legalized and 
any student may participate upon presenta- 



tion of a valid ID. 

Outsider: Anyone not connected with David- 
son College, plebeian (in other words, im- 
port). 

P.O.: Where everyone who is anyone is seen 
at 10:00 AM. 

Punting a class: When it's fourth down and a 
term paper, two reviews, and an exam to go. 
Review: a term devised to mislead Freshmen. 
You do go back over all the material ... on 
your own paper, in 50 minutes, for a grade. In 
outsiders' terms, a TEST. 
Richards & Bailey: See Slater. 
Roadtrip: When you are taken for a pleasant 
ride in the country by some friends (some 
friends!) and left to find your own way back. 
Slater: You really don't want to see it — the 
Freshman food service. 
Spot: Every Dick, Jane, and Sally wants one. 
These are old reviews given and graded in 
past years. They serve as helpful study 
guides. 

Writ: An unpleasant surprise; a baby review 
with more kick than your average "pop quiz." 
— from the 1979 Wildcat 
Handbook, Co-edited by Taine Alison and 
Andy Miller 

Let's Have a Writ! . . Dr. Louise Nelson continuously 
exhibits her command of this Davidson slang. Her 101 
classes are notorious for their daily pop quizzes. 




Claire Abernathy 

Vanessa Adams 

David Aldndge 

Lex Alexander 

Craig Alien 

Newton Allen 



Kevin Anderson 

Danny Armistead 

David Banks 

Bill Barqman 

Dan Barker 

Mark Barrett 



Thomas Bates 

Patty Bates 

Wes Bean 

Peter Beard 

Van Beck 

Warren Beck 




"^S^ik 




f 





232 PEOPLE 



JCirNK )h'S 




I (Iward Bwk«-r 
Kdlhy B«ll 



Bill Benneit 
Craig Binkley 



Oiggs Bishop 
Susan Bledsoe 



Lori Boardman 
Barbara Boyce 



Sharon Bridwell 
Andy Brown 



Jamie Brown 
Kalhryn Brown 
Lanier Brown 
Howard Browne 
Lisa Buckley 
Tucker Burks 



Joel Campanella 
Cary Campbell 
Sally Campbell 
Tom Cartee 
Steve Carter 
Yancey Carter 



Bill Chater 
Jim Cheek 
Julie Cheney 
Erik Christensen 
Chip Christian 
John Chung 



Frank Clark 

Tom Clark 

Charles Coffey 

;dward Colecfiia 

Bryan Collins 

Mike Cooppr 



Cordelia Crampton 
Mary Cranford 
Rebecca Cross 
Linda Crucidr 
Eric Crui, 
Janice Dalton 



Cfiris Daniels 

Mark Davis 

Sandra Davis 

Jofin Dent 

James Dillon 

Richard Dominick 



Stuart Dorsett 

Sally Dodd 

Charles Douglas 

Knox Douglass 

Diane Downing 

Alec Driskill 



Bryan Duke 

Debbie Eisenbise 

Jim Elliott 



Mark Elmore 
Ron Emerson 
Robert Ervin 



Daniel Ettedgui 
David Evan 
James Evan 



Cindy Faulkenberry 
Marc Fields 
Craig Finger 




254 PEOPLE 



^»E '' 



-JGMIQRS 




'^^'^fYFP 



Kenneth Fleming 
Joseph Ford 
I'li'^be Forio 

:m Fullerlon 
KiLk Gdines 
Mark Gillespy 



I<indy Gilliland 
Rob Gillison 
Richard Claze 
f d Goode 
Phillip Goodnow 
Robert Gould 



Steve Gray 
Allen Griffin 
Stephanie Guenther 
Ellen Gyauch 
Betsy Haas 
Warner Hall 



Jeff Hamilton 
Mark Hammond 
Lisa Harbottle 
Robert Harrison 
John Hartman 
James Hawk 



jiTf' 



tf-I^Hai^ , 



The Night Is Still Young 




It's called, "burning the midnight oil." This 
first cousin to the infamous, "all-nighter. ' is 
an inevitable part of Davidson life. In fact, it 
has become so popular that the middle of the 
night is practically the only socially accept- 
able time to study. 

For those hardcore (or desperate) studiers, 
who require only the bare necessities when 
studying, Davidson provides the 24 hr. Study 
Room. It comes complete with study carrels, 
chairs, dictionary, and pencil sharpener. Nes- 
tled in a secluded corner of EH. Little, the All 
Night Study Room is a favorite Friday night 
hang-out. 

But late night studying is certainly not re 
stricted to the library. In fact, no spot on 
campus, if equipped with a thirty watt light 
bulb, is exempt from such activity. Chambers 
offers excellent studying opportunities. Sever- 
al rooms are opened throughout the night, 
and the halls and bathrooms are also popular 
for studying and typing. If one gets bored or 
lonely in Chambers, it is only a short walk to 
the Chem building. The third floor is an inter- 
esting place to spend the wee hours of the 

ENJOYING THE NIGHT LIFE. Carrie Buckner spends a 
late evening outside her room in Cannon Dorm 



morning, but beware of Pre meds; their inside 
jokes are as complex as their chemical formu 
las. 

For those wishing to avoid the scientific 
atmosphere altogether. DCPC and the Meth 
odist Church offer student lounges with all 
the comforts of home — even the kitchen 
sink. Other alternatives include: Jackson 
court, Phi or Eu Halls, off -campus houses (ask 
first!), and even cars. Rumor has it that Doc 
Bryan's sauna is an especially enjoyable 
place to study, if you can stand the heat. 

For those too lazy to roam the campus in 
search of a study haven, the dorms them 
selves offer several options: dorm rooms are 
excellent places to hold those intimate study 
sessions, while the dorm lounges are good for 
massive pig-out and gossip sessions between 
graphs of Kant and Montesquieu. 

Of course, there are always those disci 
plined students who are in bed well before the 
last bagel is served in the Snack Bar. I wonder 
if they know how much fun they've been 
missing? 

-Tracy Thompson 



OPERATION EPIDEMIC 



Have you ever wanted to call off classes for 
a few days and take a vacation? Well, start an 
epidemic, it worked for us. 

First, obtain a supply of germs sufficient 
enough to devastate the campus. There are 
many effective "brands" on the market, but 
Bangkok Type A worked well for us. It is guar 
anteed to produce high fever, muscle aches, 
chills, sore throat, respiratory congestion and 
general misery. With the minimum of effort, 
we succeeded in comtaminating over four 
hundred of our closest friends and neighbors 
(not bad for our first try). 

In order to get classes called off, your epi 
demic must hit hard and fast; closing David 
son is not easy. It has only been closed twice 
in the past few decades: for half a day in 1963 
in memory of John F. Kennedy and again in 



1969 for a one day Vietnam War protest. Our 
BangkokA germs worked so well that the 
Executive Committee closed school for two 
days — January 12 and 13. This was ideal for 
an overnight ski trip. 

Before you head for the slopes however, 
make provisions for the sick. The twenty 
three bed infirmary is fine for administering 
band-aids and Dimetapp. but it simply can not 
handle an epidemic. We put the infirmary on 
a temperature-biased admissions system and 
admitted only those scoring higher than 103 
on a Farenheit scale. Those who made the 
"waiting list" were housed in "Gone With The 
Wind" style makeshift wards in the Gnion. 
The rest suffered in the privacy of their own 
dorm rooms. 

Those left in their rooms were not forgot 



ten. Cindy Faulkenberry was recruited to or 
ganize a "soup brigade" to parcel out soup, 
juice and aspirin (with Tender Loving Care) to 
the infirmed and incarcerated. Those who 
were conscious appreciated this service. 

Once this plan has been set into action, 
skip out in the middle of the night to "Ski on 
Sugar" — and laugh all the way down the 
mountain! 

— Tracy Thompson 

REMINISCENT OF THE SOUP LINES OF THE GREAT 
DEPRESSION, students banned together during David 
son s flu epidemic to cater to the needs of the ill Jeff 
Jordan. Bill Bankhead. and Ed Trumbull oversee the 
distribution of chicken soup from aid the ill headquar- 
ters in the CJnion 




janiORS 




BETI'^ 




Virtoi Hawk 
Michael Heoly 
Keith Hearle 
' iiidy Hendricks 
' i.-nl Hilleary 
Margaret Holl 



Betsy Holton 
Barbara Hoopes 
Chip Hoover 
Karen Hopper 
John Hughes 
Kim Hulett 



Joanna Hunt 
Donna lies 
Carol Impara 
Michael lordanou 
Dean Jones 
James Jones 



Renee Jones 
Michael Kehs 
Barbara Kelley 
Genevra Kelly 
Andre Kennebre« 
Knox Kerr 



Bob Klein 

Emmy Knobloch 
Gregory Kucera 
Laura Lacy 
Ralph Lasley 
Lisa Lawler 



Johnnie Leazer 
Chip Legerton 
Dennard Lindsey 
Patti Long 
Tim Lorenzen 
Becky Love 



Mancy Lowe 
Alec McCallie 
Lynn McClinlock 
Joanne MacConnachie 
Heather McCormack 
John McDonald 



Mott McDonald 
John McJunkIn 
Barry Mack 
Carolyn Mangelsdorf 
Tom Marshburn 
Thomas Martin 



Debbie Metzgar 



Bert Mobley 



Harold Mohorn 



Ginny Morrov. 



Kathy Munger 



Alice Musick 



258 PEOPLE 




JGMIORS 



Junk Food 
On The Go 



Ah yes, the proverbial junk food run — it 
occurs at a time when all good college stu- 
dents should be studying or sleeping. It is a 
time when one gives in to the temptations of 
the taste buds and of the free world (anything 
outside of E.H. Little Library), going to spend 
that last little bit of squandered change on a 
heatnserve burritto. 

What an interesting job it must be: working 
the late night weekend shift at a 24-hour junk 
food emporium. Early in the evening, the 
clerk probably sees lots of eager young faces 
buying six-packs and wine, some candy and 
spearmint gum. Moving closer to midnight, 
our clerk, who thought the evening would be 
a total waste, discovers a few blissful stu- 
dents pulling the "push" doors. (Naturally, 
this sight lends itself to a few chuckles which 
significantly intensify as our young "bliss- 
fuls" finally get inside the store and then in- 
side the freezers. After purchasing several Big 
Wheels, two bags of Doritos, and some M & 
M's, these customers depart, leaving our 
clerk to help a group of girls find the dietetic 
Fritos. 

At about 3:00 AM intense giggling in the 
parking lot announces another variation of 
the junk food run: the "I'm totally beyond 
help, give me some junk food" syndrome. 
This usually occurs after too much drinking, 
too much studying, too much college food, or 
a combination of the three. I guess sales 
clerks don't have good senses of humor, or at 
least not at 3:00 AM, because they always 
shake their heads — especially when the 
junkies try to microwave a Slurpee. I always 
thought it was funny ... at least it was at 
3:00 AM . . . after reading (?) 494 pages in 
Comicism, Fadism, and Dementacy . . . Now, 
Where's that diet Chablis? 

-Shannon Anderson 



SUITED aP FOR CHOW DOWN. Sophomore Wade An 
derson indulges in another round of junk food supplied by 
the Snack Bar 




ife4^ 




John Muskoff 
frank Myers 
Brian Nash 



David Neisler 
Charles Nichols 
James Northrup 



Chris Norwood 
Carie Nunn 
Diane Odom 



Sandra Ording 
Warren Overby 
Ann Parker 



Edith Parker 
Gia Partain 
Wayne Paymer 



Melissa Peacock 
Stokes Peebles 
Debbie Peters 



Lucy Phillips 
Mark Phillips 
Gifford Piercy 



Billy Price 
Charles Price 
David Proffit 




Susan Roberts 

Hugh Robertson 

Marvin Rogers 

Aaron Rollins 

Brian Rowan 

David Rowe 

James Sasser 






V jcax 



JGHIORS 




Violence 

Runs 
Rampant 

Early in 1980 1981 school year. Davidson 
College was hit with a rash of shooting, stab 
bings, and strangulations. The barrage of 
mass murders swept the campus in the al 
most-three month period from late October to 
early January. 

No, Davidson did not become the target of 
escaped convicts. But it was the site of a new 
game that swept college campuses through 
out the nation — The Assassination Game 

The Sig Eps initiated the Davidson game in 
which sixty eight "assassins" received killing 
contracts. After killing a victim, the murderer 
acquired the uncompleted contract of his 
dead victim, thus ensuring the progress of the 
game and eliminating players. The murderers 
used several "active" means of murder such 
as shooting, strangulation, suffocation, and 
stabbing, and the murders occured at all 
times of the day and night. 

Following the flu epidemic, three murders 
remained in the game of assassination that 
had begun in October. Freshman Frances 
Palmer performed two shootings in one night 
to "rub<Dut ' the remaining players, Sandra 
Davis and Gregg Smart. She won liquid re- 
freshments for her persistant, fearless efforts 
-Frances Palmer 



BANG! BANG! YOCRE DEAD! shouts Frances Palm 

as he "waste's Gregg Smart and wins the Assassmatit 
Game 




Michael Schremmer 
Paul Schuiz 
Claitwrne Scotl 
Joni Seehorn 
Randy Sellers 
Sally Sharp 
John Shaw 



Steve Shelby 
Leslie Shy 
John Siman 
Gary Sims 
Ray Sinclair 
Lance Sisco 
Lisa Sloan 



Dwight Smith 

Scott Smith 

Tony Smith 

Parks SneatJ 

Wilson Sofley 

Jean Soracco 



John Spangler 

Geoff Spencer 

Lee Ann Stackhouse 

Julia Stahmann 

Agnes Stevens 

Hill Stockton 



Elliott Stotler 
Harold Stringer 
Cindy Stroud 
Christopher Swofford 
Ralph Taylor 
John Teague 





262 PEOPLE 



JUNIORS 



wm^ e Wf^ 




Duty Free 

It seems that no party is ever complete 
without an ample supply of that bubbly liquid 
and an equally sufficient supply of bubbly 
blondes. In other words: beer and "imports." 

While beer is brought in by the truckload, 
imports are brought in by the bus load. One 
by one these freshly coiffed females, straight 
from a Talbots ad, decsend upon Patterson 
Court, an entourage of espadrilles. From near 
and far they come, lured by the mystique of 
the "Davidson gentlemen," and the promise 
of "a good time." All imports are welcome, 
but "Queenies" seem the most popularor 
perhaps the most easily accessible. 

Of course, not all Imports fit their stero- 
type. Then again, neither do all Davidson co- 
eds. 

•Tracy Thompson 



DAVIDSON RATIO REVERSED: Elliott Stotler enjoys 
the company of two "Queenies" In the library early one 
Monday morning. 




liey Thic» 
Hetsy Thomas 
Mark Thontss 
Nevm4 Todd 
Bob Trobich 
Jim Troulman 



Katie Tully 

Anne Turk 

Susan Von Herrmann 

Terry Wade 

Bruce Wallace 

Shannon Walters 



Whit Wampler 
Paul Ward 
Jay Warrick 
Bryna Watson 
Rick Watson 
George Webster 



Marc Webster 
David Weitnauer 
Karen Welly 



Bruce West 
Jonathan West 
Tim Whalen 



Craig White 
Liza White 
Elinos Whitlock 



Brian Whitmire 
Adelaide Wilcox 
Ann Willams 



Mary Windham 
Mien Worth 
Jeffery Wright 



I Have Been A Stranger In A 



Strange Land 




In the 1980^1 school year, Davidson host- 
ed ten international students, representing na- 
tions from France to Egypt and ambitions 
from film making to business. They arrived 
eager, confused, perhaps a little fearful, and 
what did they find? "Everything has been 
above my expectations," said Partho Choud- 
hury of India, "except maybe the city." 

A concern with Davidson's size was echoed 
often in conversations with many of the ex- 
change students. "It can be suffocating some- 
times," remarked one Internationale. Others 
found smallness preferable, however, citing 
Davidson's close-knit student body and pasto- 
ral setting. Said Harriet Holshuijsen, "The 
campus was a big reason for coming here — 
it was so nice!" 

Expectancies were varied for those who 
opted to attend Davidson for a year. Sylvia 
Navarro summarized a list of items she felt 
were associated with Americans in her native 
Spain; it included jeans. Coke, television, re- 
frigerators, new cars and movies. For Sylvia 
the real America was a surprise. "Everybody 
here works so hard!," she declared. "But for 
grades, not always to learn." Masayasu Mur- 
aki expressed similar astonishment, remark- 
ing that in Japan it is customary for students 
to coast through college after passing the en- 
trance exams. In fact, hard work seemed to be 
the biggest surprise for most of the interna- 
tional students; only one or two seemed to 
expect it at all. 

A majority of the exchange students were 
completely baffled by their first contact with 
Americans. "They seem so friendly at first," 
said one European, "but you reach a point 
and then — (she held out her hand in a push- 
away gesture). The difference in social norms 
threw most of the team into confusion initial- 
ly. "If girls start conversations with you 
where I come from, it means they're — inter- 
ested," remarked one casually. "Here it 
means they want to talk." 

Problems such as this may be solved next 
year, when the international students will be 
living throughout campus, rather than being 
grouped together in Little Dorm. It is hoped 
that this will allow them to meet more Ameri- 
can students and will promote a better under- 
standing of cultures. 

Would the exchange students recommend 
this sort of experience to their friends back 
home? Without exception, the answer was a 
resounding "Yes!" They cited different rea- 
sons, but all felt that the experience was 
worthwhile and broadening, to say the least. 
-Mike Mason 

FROM EGYPT WITH LOVE. Amr El Kadi delights eve 
one with his warmth and enthusiasm. At Davidson, he is 
willing to talk with anyone and try anything. He is espe 




A COMBINATION OF WARMTH AND SHYNESS. Moni 
que Daam is a very special person. Her special qualities 
have intriqued and enchanted her new American friends 
... as has her cooking. 



International Students 265 .^ft^ 



I Have Been A Stranger In A Strange Land 



HOLLANDER HARRIET HOLSHUIJSEN has 

enthuisiastically into Davidson life. She has exi 
pecially in varsity basketball and in Art. 




A MYSTERY MAN, Didier Valery is a loner and a 
private person; he has found Davidson a little too c 
However, he says, it is not valid to compare cultures 
besides, he came here to learn. 



IF SHE COULD DO IT OVER AGAIN, SHE'D DO IT 
OtlR WAY. Suae Klaus from West Germany really en 
joyed her year here. She has experimented in painting, 
vKith terrific results. Not only does she like our freer 
education system, but she loves the people too. She has 
become especially close to the Ortmayers, and has even 
taught their son Scott to speak German. 



INTO EVERYTHING. Tina NabholU ca - ■ 

pursue a career in business. A literatur 
she is also very interested in politics. Coming fro 
small French island in the Indian Ocean, Tina is a long 
way from home! 



PARTHO CHOUDORY combines being a Hrst rate twi 
mer with being a first rate student. He has done magnifi- 
cently at Davidson, and hopes to go on to business school 
here before returning to India. 

DESPITE SOME LANGUAGE PROBLEMS. Masayasu 
Muraki from Japan has become very much a part of the 
student body. He is shy, yet adventuresome. Many of his 
new friends fear that his trusting nature will get him into 
trouble in the OS. Where's he headed next? Maybe Bos- 
ton or New York ... 




'Hicksville' Offers New Experiences 
For Visiting Rusk Scholar 



"Hicksville", she said, "there's no other 
word for it. You'll be lucky if you get a glass 
of sherry the whole time you're there, in- 
stead it will be warm root-beer out of plastic 
cups. I'm afraid you'll run away to civiliza- 
tion". These words of warning from my 
headmistress on the subject of Davidson 
struck me as more of a challenge than any- 
thing else; it was as though she had ques- 
tioned my ability to survive in the desert 
with only a Swiss-army knife and a rolled up 
copy of the Times. From that moment on, I 
was resolved to win a Rusk Scholarship and 
to last those ten weeks of a Davidson Spring 
term. I had an advantage she didn't know 
about: I love rootbeer. 

Being without a roommate Spring term, I 
went to the Housing Office towards the end of 
February to choose my roommate for the fol 
lowing term. The announcement sheets had 
been filled with pleas for "Rusk Scholar room- 
mate " volunteers. I entered the Belk Lobby 
office of Bill Bolding and announced that I 
wished to room with a Rusk Scholar. Bill, 
elated at finding a willing roommate for one 
displaced, 18 yearold Englishman, leaped to 
his filing cabinet and extracted the informa 
tion sheet on the three female Rusk Scholars 
who would h>e arriving in Davidson in early 
March. The choice would be mine, he said. 

The scholarship duly won, I received one 
of Bill Bolding's notorious Orange Housing 
Cards. What psychological tactics, I pon- 
dered, would assure me of an affable room- 
mate? "Would you prefer a roommate that 
does not smoke?": if I said 'yes', I might 
miss out on the company of a fascinating 
nicotine-addict, if I said 'no', my life might 
become a nightmare of ash-covered carpet 
and fishing sodden filters from the basin. In 
the end, I resigned myself to spending at 
least some of my time with a mythical mon- 
ster: a field hockey wing-attack who would 
despise my lack of vigour, or perhaps a nail- 
biting xenophobe who would wince at my 
every attempt to make conversation. For 
what sort of Medusa, I wondered, could still 
be without a roommate by the Spring term? 

Social psychologists profess that our first 
impressions are generally formulated by 
looks. If this hypothesis was true, I probably 
would not have returned to school after 
Spring Break. The information sheet on each 
Rusk Scholar exhibited, in the top right cor- 
ner, a small photograph of the individual. 
Among the photos of well-scrubbed, youthful 
faces was a sinisterlymenacing mug shot of a 
wild-haired girl with a penetrating, unyielding 
stare. As i curiously looked over this housing 
card, phrases from an instructor-recommen- 



dation held my curiosity, " outgoing per 

sonality, . vigorus, openness of re 

sponse "I read no further; as if siding with 
a social radical, I defiantly and confidently 
chose Miranda Morrison as my roommate. 

Well, I met my Medusa the Sunday before 
classes began. I had already done some re- 
connaisance work on the room (surveying 
the decor and possessions for any hints of 
the inhabitant's nature) but had so far failed 
to find her at home. The electric green co- 
lorscheme had prepared me for someone as- 
sertive; would she be overbearing? Such 
speculation was brought to an end when our 
paths coincided for the first time. It was a 
pretty insubstantial first encounter: "We'll 
talk later; I'm the editor of the yearbook, and 
I must go over to my office right now". All I 
remember is thinking "How grand, having 
your own office", and that she looked friend- 
ly enough. If I'd seen the office, I would never 
have been so impressed. 

"Openness of response" as an understate 
ment; "uninhibited bluntness" would have 
been more the appropriate description. Mir 
anda entered my room (soon to become our 
room) eagerly the first time we met, and her 
directness did not falter throughout the 
twelve weeks we spent together. Miranda s 
bluntbut-observant appraisals of Davidson 
Life shocked me our first evening together — 
Davidson situations that I could have consid 
ered sacred. She told me unhesitantly of her 
meeting with the girls on our hall who "live in 
the Opium Den", and she described to me an 
encounter she had had with a Davidson celeb 
rity who "was quite toad-like". Fortunately 
for our rooming situation, I, too, agreed with 
her first impression-appraisals of Davidson 
life, and did not consider them sacred. 

Living with the Yearbook Editor is not un- 
like coming into contact with a contagious 
disease: you immediately find yourself an- 
swering "business" calls, pretty soon you're 
discussing deadlines and photography ses- 
sions, and before you can stop the process, 
you're sitting up until 4:00 a.m. like a zom- 
bie, writing captions and typing copy by the 
twofinger method (parenthetically, this copy 
was written at 2:48 a.m. in the foyer of the 
Wildcat Club office in basement Chambers). 
This was an exceptional case; not many 
Rusk Scholars need fear such infection, but I 
think that Bill Bolding should have included 
an option or two on his orange card. I sug- 
gest "Do you like late nights?", and "Can 
you crop photographs?" for starters. 

Miranda was a tough kid. Ours was a clas 
sic case of "old-hand" and "greenhorn '. put- 
ting a "freshman" foreigner in with a Junior. 



More often than not, she went along to cam 
pus activities, supplied, on parting, with some 
or all of the pertinent facts. Had she totally 
adopted my social schedule, she would not 
have met many of the people she met or done 
many of the things she did. No amount of 
enthusiasm on her part could persuade me to 
attend Hatties Might, for example, having vis- 
ited the drunken revellry once before. Instead, 
1 drew her a map to F & M, and she went, 
Davidson cup in-hand, on her way. 

In regards to fashion, I'm afraid that the 
English and American Styles will never be 
fully reconciled. Nothing will ever make 
Diane understand my passion for Chinese 
workmen's jackets or for dubiously shaped 
"granny" dresses; nor will I ever get used to 
her love for things gaudy or for sleeveless 
patio pinafores. The prevailing interest 
among American girls seems to be a look 
freshly laundered, well-heeled, and feminine, 
whereas the English girls favor a more pro- 
saic, riske, and even androgynous image. I 
did compromise my appearance quite se- 
verely, however, while at Davidson, and it 
was not unknown for me to sport a button- 
down or a pair of khakis. One piece of nota- 
ble common-ground between us, perhaps, 
was our mutual love of saddle shoes, which 
we were both really too old to wear. 

Miranda was wearing balloon-shaped jeans 
(tight at the waist and the ankles, and huge 
inbetween), a white cook's jacket splatter- 
painted with red, blue, and yellow die, dark 
glasses, white athletic socks, and Bass Wee- 
jun loafers on the first day 1 met her; I must 
also add that she had one large earring, a 
minature globe of the world, hanging from her 
left earlobe. My first thought was that, surely, 

MOVIE MONGUL Mirandd Morrison directs John 
McDowell in a Super 8 special. Miranda preserved her 
Davidson Experience" in a movie she filmed while on 
campus- 

CULTURAL EXCHANGE: Rusk Scholar Miranda Mou 
bray shares a |oke with Stewart MacWilliam. 




268 PEOPLE 




in ten-week's tinne, she would come to appre- 
ciate cotton skirts and faded Levi's (the old. 
cioseminded "everyone would appreciate the 
American way of life if they only knew it" 
syndrome) I was wrong. Miranda insisted 

on wearing a black, wool, man's suit (pur- 
chased at the "smartest Jumble Sale in Lon- 
don" — a rummage sale by our standards) 
when she went to meet the Governor of Morth 
Carolina, and she endlessly offered to let me 
borrow her shapeless, one piece, Osh kosh 
boiler suit. I was constantly confronted in the 
bathroom by girls on our hall who cautiously 
asked. "How do you and your foreign room 
mate get along? She seems so different 
"Different " in that she didn't own a pair of 
duck shoes or didn't consider the morning 
shower-scene in the bathroom the social cen 
ter of the campus — Yes. But "different " as 
in bizzare. unfashionable, or anti social — Mo 
As for my ""Rusk Scholar " experience, 
would not trade it for anything (irregardless of 
the fact that this yearbook would not have 
been a reality had it not been for Miranda and 
her diligent two-finger typing), and for me its 
been an experience no Liberal Arts Education 
could have been complete without. 

Miranda Morrison and Diane Odom 




■^ -^ 



TEEING-OP. Simon Witty addresses the ball for a prac- 
tice swing Simon had difficulty joining the Varsity golf 
team because of his International Student status. 

RUSK SCHOLARS: (front row) Dominic Ferard, Tim 
Howe. Simon Witty; (Back row) Anthea Goode. MirarKla 
Morrison Chris Lockwood. Miranda Mowbray 



Rusk Scholars 269 



Class of '81 Knows What It Takes 



How To Succeed Without Really Trying 



This page has been reserved for instruc- 
tional excerpts from the Annual Staff's up- 
coming bestseller, Survival in The Prep Jun- 
gle. Compiled from our countless interviews 
with seniors whom everyone knows are filled 
with experience among other things, the book 
will be a set of helpful guidelines for the unini- 
tiated in every class at Davidson. Here are 
some highlights: 

Rule #7 Never sit on a prospective student. 
Those people are everywhere, and it's easy to 
mistake the ones from Wyoming for used 
armchairs. Likewise, never force a prospec- 
tive to consume illegal drugs, never beat one 
senseless, and certainly never refer to his 
grandmother in a derogatory fashion. The Ad- 
missions Office frowns on all of these fun 
capers and may cut your career at Davidson. 

Rule #23 Never attempt to consume a keg 
by yourself. Ask a friend to help. 

Rule #39 When under academic stress, do 
not spray-paint your roommate's face, chase 
small children about, or endeavor to eat the 
fire extinguisher on First Sentelle. These will 
do nothing to eradicate the problem. Instead, 



it is advisable to crawl into your professor's 
office and crouch in the corner, drooling pro- 
fusely and screaming about the purple spi- 
ders crawling in your hair. This comic prank 
will generally elicit some helpful response on 
the professor's part and should ease the strain 
somewhat. 

Rule #78 Stay clear of the Annual Staff. 

Rule #114 Never try to leave the post of- 
fice at 10:00 a.m. Besides committing the 
social blunder of your college career, you will 
also be swallowed immediately in a herd of 
students stampeding desperately toward their 
post office boxes. Wait until about 10:02 a.m. 
By that time, the herd will have discovered 
nothing more than coupons from Lowe's and 
will begin stampeding angrily back towards 
the dorms. Just lift up your feet and go with 
the flow. 

Rule #126 If you must write graffitti on the 
bathroom walls, don't include pictures or dia- 
grams. Sometimes it's best to keep the public 
in ignorance. 

Rule #150 Decide what you want out of 
Davidson — then go get it! Many seniors 



attribute their success to this aggressive atti- 
tude and to their skill in "polishing the ole 
apple." There is a catch, however. You may 
only practice this skill as an underclassman. 
By the time you reach the status of "Big Man 
on Campus," you must take on a new attitude 
— be slack as possible and sneer maliciously 
at the lowly brown-nosers painfully working 
their way up the ladder of success at David- 
son. 

Well, there you have it-some of our most 
refined bits of knowledge from the Senior 
class. With so substantial a foundation on 
which to build, who can doubt that some day 
in the near future new classes will survey the 
vast, unreached peaks of knowledge because 
they have stood on the feet of these giants? 

— Mike Mason 

THE INFORMAL AIR BETWEEN FACULTY AND 
STUDENTS is essential for success at Davidson. 
Bryan Kelleher and Dr. Louise Nelson relax out- 
side the classroom at the F & M cocktail party. 





Kalhryn E Adkins 



Elizabeth G Alexander 



Shera A Alford 



Katherine M Allen 



James W. Altizer 



Michael S Ameen 



Barbara A. Ashley 



Charles G. Askii 



Alvin L. Atkinson 



Stephen W Austin 



Laura L. Babcock 



Atmire Bailey. Jr- 



James S. Bailey * 



272 PEOPLE 





Space Games Invade Campus 



Earlier in the year when I was eating lunch 
in the Snack Bar, I thought I heard Jaws 
coming to get me, but when I realized that it 
was only Space Invaders and that strange 
sound it makes. Only Space Invaders?! I 
could get shot for that! I have since found out 
that Space Invaders and its clones such as the 
new favorite, Asteroids, are the most popular 
participatory and spectator sports at David 
son. The fanatical following of these games is 
phenomenal; people actually schedule their 
meals (their lives!) around times when they 
can play THE games. 

But what is the big attraction? Why waste 
so much time and money on something so 
trivial? "I don't know" is the usual response 
offered by most of the Space Invader Grou- 
pies. But one freshman, Jenny O'Briant, went 
into a little more detail: "It's a way to relieve 
all my frustrations. When you play the ma- 
chines it gets your mind off the tensions and 
worries caused by daily academic pressures. 
Anyway, it's fun!" 



Another victim of "Invaderitis" admitted 
that he just liked to see his name printed on 
the screen for getting one of the top scores of 
the day. 'Once you put that first quarter in, 
you're hooked," Bill Crone said. "You've got 
to play until you win — you can't let a game 
beat you!" 

The thrill of victory, the agony of defeat, 
and the release of tension are all part of the 
Invaders' mystique, but there is also some- 
thing amusing about this epidemic. Perhaps 
the funniest sight is the piles of quarters 
stacked on the machines, the guys crowded 
intently around them, and their dates stand 
ing passively in the background! "Oh, my 
quarter has come up so I'll have to end this 
article — Asteroids calls!" 

— Shannon Anderson 

THE CHALLENGE OF SPACE irHVADERS IS 
ADDICTING as Bruce Wallace indicates. This of- 
ten takes priority over the challenges of the aca 

demic world. 



Lisa M. Ballantyne 



Shelli A. Ballantyne 




David R. Barkley 



Carolyn B. Barnett 



Cynthia L. Barron 



Jannes H. Baskin 



Davidson 

"Davidson is different from any other 
college."' Perhaps that Is what drew 
Wendy Van Voorhees, like so many oth- 
er transfer students, to Davidson. Per- 
haps that is also what caused special 
difficulties in adjustment of transfers to 
Davidson. 

Davidson boasts of a very good fresh- 
man program. There is a special pride 
and concern in the freshman student. 
But, once one graduates out of "fresh- 
manhood," he's expected to know 
what's going on and how to cope with it 
. . . Yikes! Where does this leave the 
sophomore and junior transfer stu- 
dents? 

"The hardest thing to adjust to was 
the people," says Wendy. "Most people 
had already formed close friendships 
from freshman halls. " How to remedy 
this? A transfer orientation program is 
one suggestion. Putting transfers in im- 
mediate contact with other students 
who are aware that they are transfers 
and that they don't know all the ropes 
around campus may help the transfers 
to adjust more easily. 

Moving into any new situation can be 
a lonely and frustrating time. Many 
transfers wind up "transferring" right 
out of Davidson. But the majority stays, 
and after an initial "breaking in period" 
they are usually pleased with their 
choice. 

Why? Because, "Davidson is different 
from any other college . . . it's just not 
the same as big institutions or even oth- 
er small, private colleges. " Davidson's 
not for everybody — but if it's for you, 
then no other place will do. 

— Lisa Sloan 



T"V< 



I 





K^B^I 








- hU 



College Transfers Need Helpful Contacts 




GETTING INVOLVED IN EXTRACURRICULAR 
ACTIVITIES is a good way for transfers to meet 
more Davidson students. Sissy McCamy talks 
with Joan Redding at an APO book sale. 




'Dog Days' Is 
No DC Cliche 

DDOC 
(Davidson Dogs On Campus) 

Look at thenn puppy dogs — ain't they 
sweet? 

Hanging out at Slater for scraps of . . . 
meat? 

Oh, there's little dogs here and big dogs 
there 

On Davidson's campus, there's dogs every- 
where. 

Now you might ask yerself whar'd we git 

ail these dogs; 
I ain't positive just yets, 
But I bet somes is pets. 
And as for the rest, they're born in the 

woods, raised in the bogs — 
They're tough but they're cool — them 

Davidson dogs. 

Most renowned is Fred, who responds to 

any name. 
He's a leader no doubt, 
You just can't keep him out 
Of classes, of dorms . . oh, he's got quite 

a terrain 
Liberal with kisses, he seeks attention and 

fame. 

"Being a stray can be a very satisfying 

career," 
Says Smiley, the F & M pet. 



He's always there, haven't seen him 

move yet, 
I think he's got tenure, along with free 

beer- 
Dog days may be rough, but not around 
here. 

F & M's not the only adopter — about this 

we make no pretense. 
So Bill Holding close your eyes 
Though I doubt it's no surprise 
That in those perimeter houses, besides 

assigned students 
Honey, Bub, and Corgy . . . have filed for 

permanent residence. 

In spite of being treated like dogs, they 
exert much self-control. 

A few have contracts with the mainte- 
nance crew. 

They water the flora . . . and fertilize too. 

Harold the cop assigned several dogs to 
the difficult night patrol 

And they're politically active in the DDOC. 

So when you look at them puppy dogs — 
and think they're so sweet. 

Best stop and realize that they do more 
than eat meat. 

They're important in our Davidson exper- 
ience, after all can you recall- 

Your freshman year, those rainy days, 
and . . that smelly wet dog on the hall? 

— Lisa Sloan 

FLIRTING WITH ONE ANOTHER OR JGST 
LAYING AROUND — this constitutes the diffi- 
cult job of being a Davidson College campus pet. 
What a life! 




276 PEOPLE 




Stuart G. Baskin 
Lucy F Bedlnger 
Susan L. Beesley 
Deborah I. Bland 
Timothy P Bohnslav 
Mary B. Booth 




Even At Davidson College 



It all started one night as we sat around 
the dinner table swapping stories about our 
wild experiences as delinquent students. 
Interestingly enough, what we discovered 
was that Davidson students are pretty 
adept at finding something out of the ordi- 
nary to do when bored. Yes, even at David- 
son College, students have been known to 
indulge in riotous living and debauchery. 
The "less than legal" activities that stu- 
dents engage in have ranged from harm- 
less pranks to out and out vandalism. 

One popular type of delinquency in- 
volves going where one is not supposed to 
go. For example, the water towers in the 
Davidson area have always tempted stu- 
dents to "aspire to greater heights." If you 
do not mind rickety ladders and a menac- 
ing graveyard below you, then climbing the 
towers may be your thing. Of course, there 
is a steep fine for anyone caught climbing 
the towers, but some persevering indivi- 
duals always manage to make it to the top 
— as the graffitti on the water tanks at- 
tests. And, then there's the challenge of 
scaling the heights of the Chamber's 
Dome. This has resulted in the past in 
signs being hung from the dome, in supply- 
ing the chambermaids with a new ward- 
robe, or in accosting poor inocent victims 
who happen to be passing below. 

One senior recounted the time she was 
walking past Chambers about 12:30 AM 
when a voice from above thundered, "You 
there. Stop! This is the Lord." She trem- 
bled in her tracks for a moment until she 
realized the voice had a definite southern 



accent, more than that, it bordered on red- 
neck. Somewhat suspicious, she looked up 
towards the dome and replied, "Yes, 
Lord?" The voice boomed forth; "Repent 
ye sinner and redeem yourself from your 
drunken rampages-in that hellhole the 900 
Room." Going along with the supposed 
"Lord" she protested her innocence. It was 
too much when a chorus of tipsy angels on 
high began singing sweetly o'er the cam- 
pus-"Amazing Grace (hiccup) how sweet 
the sound, that saved a wretch (hiccup) 
like me (hiccup)." The victim of God's 
wrath was not so much intrigued by who 
was on the dome or why, but in how they 
got up there. She told me that the last time 
she had tried to get up on top of Chambers 
a metal plate and a new lock had been 
bolted onto the door leading to the roof. 
She supposed that this addition had been 
made because she had so abused the door 
earlier with a screwdriver and crowbar try- 
ing to have a little late-night fun on the 
dome. 

If heights bother you, try a more down to 
earth method of release — streaking. And, 
if you're really big on creating a public 
disturbance you can always follow the ex- 
ample of one Davidson student, now gradu- 
ated, who was known to sit in a tree at 
night around 1:00 AM and scream for a 
half hour. Creating a public distrubance, 
however, is not all that rewarding — may- 
be because there is so little public to dis- 
turb. 

Illegal or just a little clean fun? Davidson 
students are renowned for thinking up 



ways to entertain themselves when the 
lure of the library is more like a baited trap 
for the unwary. If there are no parties to go 
to and the 900 Room has become old hand, 
what can a student do for fun — short of 
breaking the law? A trip to Charlotte is 
often too expensive and not very challeng- 
ing, and Mooresville's Bowling Alley and 
What-A-Burger soon lose their appeal. 

Burdened and bored students often cut 
loose from the day to day routine by "roll- 
ing" the campus with toilet paper, stealing 
toilet seats from a dorm, or by swiping car 
batteries. All of these activities have gone 
on record as occurring, and, yet, there are 
many others that rarely receive wide- 
spread publicity. Having drug parties, mak- 
ing obscene phone calls, setting off false 
fire alarms, and pulling dorm fuses go on 
here as much as on other college cam- 
puses. Davidson for all its good points is no 
exception when it comes to finding ways 
to have fun. Unfortunately, students occa- 
sionally indulge in activities such as van- 
dalism involving dorm destruction and 
damage to student property. One student's 
car window was smashed in, street lamps 
have been upended, furniture tossed out of 
windows and the age-old "broken beer bot- 
tles chucked out the third floor window" 
litter the campus with broken glass. 

Yet, there is a lighter side to "illegal" 
activities at Davidson. Many students 
seem to relieve tension by getting involved 
in activities that may be frowned upon by 
others but ones that they consider a wel- 
come relief. If group activities such as pan- 
ty and jock raids aren't your thing, then try 
your own adventure such as spending the 
night in the library or posting obscene bill- 
boards around the campus. A local favorite 




is to rearrange (maliciously) the letters on 
the events board in Chambers. And, this 
year someone seems to have had a fetish 
for racing through Chambers leaving a 
whirlwind of rippedoff notices and com- 
puter print-outs floating to the floor. Of 
course, you can always resort to personal 
vendettas and friendly sabotage of a hall- 
mate's room. (Try making a salad com- 
plete with dressing in your enemy's bed!) 
One great revenge tactic among fraterni- 
ties is stealing the official charter or other 
treasured items. 

All in all, Davidson seems to be a typical 
campus insofar as illegal activities go. 
Whether you choose to climb a water 
tower or to streak, students are constantly 
looking for new ways to have fun and re- 
lieve the tension and doldrums. Now, we 
don't advise that Davidson students en- 
gage in these social events which are not 
exactly favorable in the eyes of Sam, Will, 
or Captain Hughes. But, those who have 
gone before us have left an interesting lega- 
cy that many scheming students consider 
a challenge — a campus record to be 
broken — so to speak! 

-Nan Zimmerman 

SIPPING CIDER THROUGH A STRAW? Since 
when has drinking a 'Big O" been IllegaP 




279 



sgggsags g^asn^ 




A WARM SPRIMG DAY ON RICHARDSON PLA- 
ZA was the site for a special Coffee and Cokes 
held in honor of EH. Littles 100th birthday. 



280 PEOPLE 





Esthei L Bruce 



l^At 



X^^ 



Come Take A 
Coffee Break 

Take 40 dozen doughnuts, 60 liters of 
soda. 30 pounds of ice, and 400 people 
and what have you got? Thursday 
morning Coffee and Cokes at Davidson. 
The 10 o'clock hour, once reserved for 
chapel, on Thursdays becomes a won- 
derful opportunity for students and fac- 
ulty to get together informally to chat 
over coffee and doughnuts. The event is 
typical of the personal level on which 
Davidson operates to maintain a unity 
between faculty and students. 

"There's a lot of work involved in 
setting the whole thing up, " says senior 
Jonathan Keith who co-ordinates the 
weekly tradition. "But it's worth the ef- 
fort. The hour is really enjoyable in that 
it promotes the closeness and compas- 
sion found in the Davidson community. 
It gives students and administrators 
alike the opportunity to break away 
from their hectic schedules." 

Occasionally, during these morning 
gatherings, speakers are present to dis- 
cuss current campus events and the 
like. Also, some form of art exhibit is 
almost always on display in the gallery. 
But, the lively atmosphere is created 
not by the food or issues at hand but by 
the people themselves and their inter- 
personal contact. 

Due to the special spring-term sched- 
uling, the Thursday morning Coffee and 
Cokes was switched to Wednesdays. Al- 
though the day was different, the people 
were the same and Coffee and Cokes 
still attracted a crowd for a college-wide 
coffee break. 

— Caroline Boudreau 




A Cray Bullard 




Jeffrey D Burns 





Donald H Caldwell. Jr. 



Robert F Campany 




Barbara L. Cape 



Frank M. Capella 



J 



Huldah D. Carllon 

Katherine Christie 

Peter D. Collins 

Nancy N. Cornwell 

Sarah J. Craig 

Murray B. Craven, III 




Perimeter Houses Offer Unique Lifestyle 



Davidson College Housing includes ten col- 
lege owned houses In which students, nnostly 
seniors, may choose to live rather than the 
traditional dorm rooms. In addition to these, 
many people in the community rent rooms 
and houses to students. A total of 120 stu- 
dents live off campus; that is 9% of the stu- 
dent body. 

Why so many in off campus houses? This 
is why. 

Laura Babcock: "I wanted to room with a 
bunch of people I knew well for my senior 
year." 

Dick Jones: "To evade the noise . . . and, I 
enjoy cooking. I moved off because it pro- 
vides a quieter atmosphere with more room 



to spread out." 

Kathy Hoffman: "I like the idea of going 
downstairs into a living room." 

Ellen Gyauch: "A triple in Cannon was a little 
too close for comfort." 

Chuck Leucker: "I was in search of a kitch- 
en." 

Martha Anne Whitmore: "Living off campus 
is just the thing to do when you're a sen- 
ior. ' 

Lance Sisco: "Living off campus provides a 
more flexible environment, more privacy, 
but still can have the closeness of friends." 

Linda Hoopes: "I was J.Y.A. last year and this 
is where I ended up." 

Rhett Thompson: "Living off campus is bet- 
ter than a dorm or hall — you've got more 



freedom to be rowdy without worrying 
about Ixjthering other people." 
Chris Moore: "I wanted to be with eight of my 
friends. " 

Although limited dorm space did force 
many students to live off campus, judging 
from these positive responses, most have ad- 
justed well and are enjoying their new resi- 
dences. 

— Lisa Sloan 

ALL THE COMFORTS OF HOME AND MORE! 
Seniors Ralph Mosca and Ctiris Elwood lake ad 
vantage of ttieir honney atmosphere and escape 
the doldrums of dorm life. 



yi 






Impromptu Shows Reveal Hidden Talents 



Everyone loves an entertainer — that spe- 
cial person who can draw a crowd anywhere 
he goes with his clowning, some music, or 
whatever appeals to an audience. He loves 
the crowd, and if the truth be told, an enter- 
tainer may be having more fun than his audi- 
ence. Davidson has many such people with a 
variety of talents which they express in var- 



ious and often creative ways. Many take ad- 
vantage of impromptu opportunities to per- 
form, and, when there is an organized show, 
they appear "on stage" without fail. 

While they may be a little less refined, the 
spur-of-the-moment shows are certainly the 
best. People who can sing or play the guitar or 
banjo went Pumpkin carolling and Christmas 



carolling, providing many halls with late-night 
seasonal entertainment. On many warm days, 
those such as freshmen Neil Sondov and Paul 
Fry can be seen sitting in dorm windows 
strumming softly on guitars. Dramatic pro- 
ductions as well as musical ones are often 
staged. For example, ATO on a semi-regular 
basis, presents homemade dramatic produc- 





Lena J Crawley 



Michelle Creel 



tions, such as its annual "Ides of March" In 
the lobby of the library, which have quite a 
following among Davidson library rats. Al- 
though a great deal of Davidson talent re- 
mains under cover most of the time, it is 
drawn out in public by such events as the Top 
Hats and Cat Tails talent show and Open-Mike 
Might in the 900 Room. Top Hats and Cat 
Tails which took place Homecoming week 
featured singers, dancers, bands, musicians, 
and comedians. The Wally Beaver Band, the 
group that won the talent show, is a typical 
example of Davidson talent. The five band 
members, Kevin Uram, Andy Miles, Frank 
Bright, Frank Myers, and Curtis Markham, 

' play because they love it, and, while they 
would like to entertain at regular clubs, they 

' do not do so because of lack of equipment. 
Among the many faces at the 900 Room's 
Op>en-Mike Night was guitarist Mike Smith. 
He has entertained around Davidson on sever- 
al occasions, alone, or with his roommate 
Curtis Morthrup. "I've had my mind on that 
900 Room stage ever since I visited the cam- 
pus," he said. When asked why, his answer 
was typical of an entertainer, "I like a crowd 
— the bigger the crowd the better, and it 
doesn't matter the age. Playing music's one of 
the best ways to draw a crowd, and so I plan 
to keep doing it for as long as I'm able." 

— Caroline Boudreau 

THEY SAY THAT MOSIC SOOTHES THE 
SOtJL. and James Barrat apparently finds music a 
(ood way to unwind and relax from the day s 
outine. 



Hugh C Crenshaw 



Felzer E Crockett 



William H Oascombe 



Phillip R Daves 



DC Fans Flock To Coliseum 



Because many of Davidson's home basket- 
ball games take place at the Charlotte Colise- 
um, a routine develops among students pre- 
paring for an evening at a game. The first step 
involves gathering a group of people to go to 
the gym a day early to get tickets for seats 
that are together; this makes for more coher- 
ent and unified jeering or cheering, whatever 
the case may be. 

After a rushed dinner, the haggling begins 
as to who will drive, how little gas can the car 
get by on, who gets squashed in the back seat 
with six others, and who's going to pay for 
parking. Then, everyone piles into the car, 
races down the Davidson Motor Speedway (I- 
77) to the Coliseum, and finds some seats that 
are better than the ones the student tickets 
were for. This may involve some musical 
chairs when people try to claim their rightful 
seats, but it's worth it to get a front row seat. 

There follows an evening of cheering our 
Wildcats on to victory in a manner which 
gives each spectator a feeling of participation 
in the game and insures that we will not get 
the Sportsmanship Award again next year! 

After the game, since you're already in 
Charlotte, it's a good time to go to La Strada's 



or Godfather's for a brew and pizza — in that 
order. And, of course, who could ever pass up 
a Krispy Kreme run? The place is impossible 
to get to (NO LEFT TGRNS) and the service 
defies description, but it's definitely worth the 
trouble. 

The atmosphere of the game is generally 
determined by the type of fans one chooses to 
go with. Inviting one's parents is a nice way to 
see the folks but often does not lend itself to 
excessive jumping up and down and scream- 
ing "Abuse". At the other end of the spec- 
trum lies the option of sitting with a fraternity 
which often establishes itself as head rabble- 
rouser. This gives one an opportunity to ex- 
perience lots of noise, excitement, and some 
rather unconventional cheers — "Eat it Ref! " 
The Charlotte basketball games, even though 
they lack the coziness of Johnston Gym, have 
an atmosphere all their own for Wildcat bas- 
ketball fans. 

— Caroline Boudreau 

NEVER ONES TO SCREAM "ABaSE," Doug Ziedonis 
' and Earl Ransom instruct the ref on the finer points of 
calling a basketball game. 




Mary G Davidson 

John S Davis 

Ronald R. Davis 

Clarence J Delforge. Ill 

Alexander G. Donald. Jr 

William F Dunbar. IV 





286 PEOPLE 





1 




H^^^r^^ 



M. Susan Eglcn 
Julia L. Eichelberger 
Marie L. Ellis 
Reed M. Ellis 
Christopher L Elwood 
James M. Eire 




288 PEOPLE 




Leaves Create 

Alternative 
To Snow Man 

People walking in front of Cfiambers ear- 
ly In November noticed a tall, dark strang- 
er on campus. He was about eight feet tall 
with a large, square head, stumpy arms 
and legs, and a body made of leaves. He 
was an impressive character, but he stood 
for only a day, after which the lines sup- 
porting him from nearby trees broke and 
he feel. The Leaf Man was the project of 
several members of ATO, among whom 
were Elizabeth Alexander. Charles Askins, 
David Lyons, Eddie Aziz, and Dave Banks. 
He was made of chicken wire and stuffed 
full of leaves. The lines were added to 
neighboring trees when he became too 
heavy to support himself. When asked 
where the idea for the Leaf Man came 
from, David Lyons explained, "When 
there's lots of snow on the ground, people 
always build snowmen. There were all 
those nice leaves sitting around, so we de- 
cided we wanted a leaf man." 

— Caroline Boudreau 

FREQaENTLY MISTAKEN FOR ANOTHER CO-ED. 
this Leaf Person garnished the campus in the early 
autumn just as the leaves began to fall. 




HERE'S TO GOOD FRIENDS AND GETTING 
DRUNK! Rip Singer, Danny Pellarin. Chris Nor 
wood, and Diane King quench their thirst in the 
900 Room, 




Quarters Inspires Drinking Competition 



"This one's for JT." Klink , . , splat. "Drink 
up, my friend. This time, let's make it Brian," 
Klink , , , splat. "Okay, fill er up and get 
ready Ralph. " Klink , , , ping, ping, ping , 
thud, 

Sound familiar? It should if you happen to 
drop by the 900 Room most any evening. The 
sound of quarters klinking and landing in a 
cup of beer often rises above the conversa- 
tional din of students relaxing after a hard day 
in the reference stacks. Drinking games have 
always had a devoted following but none 
seems to be more distinctive than "Quarters" 
where the coins bounce, the beer flows, and 
the unlucky chuggers are noisily encouraged. 
After tossing off two or three beers the game 
becomes very intense and truly competitive. 
And, if by chance you drop by the 900 Room 
to see a show, you may have to put up with 
the noisy participants. 

Avid players seem to have a variety of 
ground rules for "Ciarters," but the goal re- 
mains the same: to perfect the artistic style of 
bouncing quarters in the desired direction, to 



determine the drinker with the greatest endur- 
ance, and, ultimately, to provide "total" relax 
ation for all involved. INo matter what the 
specific rules of the drinking game, there are 
a few universal ones which may not be violat- 
ed. 1. If you play you must be willing to suffer 
any consequences and not chicken out. 2. 
Players may use every possible means (no 
matter how devious) to cheat or inflict hard- 
ship on the competitors, but you cannot be 
caught. 3. The loser must drink. 4. All play- 
ers must strive to maintain their dignity 
when chugging as beer trickles down their 
chins and drips quietly on their legs. 

Other games such as "Zoom," "Categor- 
ies," "Wales-Tails," and "Numbers" are en- 
thusiastically played. All one needs is a few 
friends and the drinks. But. there are also the 
more conventional board games such as 
"Pass Out, " "Booze It Up," and 'Sip and Go 
Naked. " What better way to prove your dex- 
terity and quick thinking than these mind- 
boggling games of strategy? When "Monopo- 
ly" becomes a bore and poker gets too expen- 



sive, games of alcohol versus tolerance and 
control provide a unique challenge. There is 
also the added sadistic joy of watching your 
friends "lose it." 

What are the rewards for these games: Tro- 
phies, titles, money, or fame? Many question 
the purpose of drinking games and can see no 
valid reason for games aimed solely at getting 
drunk. One group huddled around a table in 
the 900 Room with several empty pitchers 
declared their express intent of playing a cou- 
ple of rounds of "Quarters" in order to get 
plastered and have a few laughs. Beyond the 
desire to have a good time, they felt no need 
to justify their actions; it is doubtful that they 
felt much of anything at the time! 

As in the case of many collegiate ways of 
having fun, there seems to be little firm de- 
fense for drinking games. Nonetheless, the 
games go on. Some win. some lose, and some 
just pass out. 

— Too Drunk To Remember 



290 PEOPLE 




Alexander W. Evani 



Virginia B Evans 



Mark E. Fahey 



Lois W. Fields 



Robert E Fields, III 



Michael P Fitzgerald 



William F Flanagan 




Op, Op, And 
Away . . . 

You lean back, and — swoosh — the 
wind whips through your hair as you swing 
down, and then bacl< up again. The exer- 
cise and the cool air are perfect for refresh- 
ing a tired brain. Whoever put the swing up 
in the tree outside Richardson dorm knew 
exactly what cooped-up students some- 
times need as a break from the books. On 
nice days, the swing is put to various uses. 
Some -students take their books out to sit 
in the swing and read; others leave their 
books behind and swing to get away from 
them. Step-tutors can be seen giving their 
young students a ride, and couples swing 
together or give one another a push. That 
swing is evidence of the child still present 
in all of us who likes to go play in the 
playground on sunny afternoons. 

— Caroline Boudreau 

LEAVING THE BOOKS FAR BEHIND, Rob lies 
finds the swing a great new place for mixing with 
freshmen Aubrey Humphries, Donna Thompson, 
and Elizabetti Smiley. 



292 PEOPLE 





Mildred C. Fleming 
Eric C. Frey 
Robert W. Frierson 
Martha L. Frye 
Edward F. Gayrwr. Jr. 
John R Gepfert. IV 



Seniors 293 



Julie S. Gibert 



Kirk R. Gravely 



Sharon L. Gravett 



David K, Green 



Pamella A Gregg 



Marcia M. Grove 



Anne B Querard 




294 PEOPLE 





Davidson On 
The Warpath 



Shaved heads in brightly colored ban- 
danas were a familiar sight on campus 
this fall. About ten of the front linesmen 
on the Davidson football team had their 
heads shaved in the "mohawk" style to 
boost morale for the Bucknell game in 
early October. Hopefully this would car- 
ry the team into a winning streak. 

Heads were shaved completely ex- 
cept for a "mohawk" strip down the 
middle, and numbers from their football 
jerseys were formed by unshaven hair 
on either side of the mohawk. Pat Sheri- 
dan, Patrick Pope, Jeff Kane, and Steve 
Lowe were among those who sacrificed 
their hair in order to psyche out their 
opponents. The famous "Norton's" on 
Main Street perpetrated the deed. The 
effort was obviously successful as Da- 
vidson defeated a strong Bucknell team. 

— Katie Tully 

aNVEILriNG HIS NEW MOHAWK HAIRSTYLE. 
Patrick Pope sheds his helmet and takes full ad- 
vantage of a well-deserved break from the game. 




Peter Hairston. Jr. 

Aurie T. Hall 

Mark R. Halton 

Edith V. Hammond 

Kevin R. Hanna 

John R. Haskell 



296 PEOPLE 




Tradition Keeps It All In The Family 



One of the most noticeable things to an 
outsider coming to Davidson is that it is a 
college steeped in tradition. The traditions of 
the school are cherished and kept alive by 
loyal faculty and alumni. Part of the reason 
why there is so much continuity here is that 
Davidson College is as much a tradition to 
many of the students as they are a part of its 
traditions. A publication called "Generations 
of Davidson College" by Dr. Chalmers David- 
son records the families which have had more 
than one generation at the college. Presently, 
there are one hundred and ninety-nine stu- 
dents here whose fathers are alumni. To date, 
there have been one hundred and eighty-three 
three-generation families. Coeducation has 
definitely helped in alumni continuity, as 



there are now twenty-five daughters on the 
rolls of three-generation alumni families. This 
book records the old "Davidson families," 
and it is not meant to offend any newcomers. 
Its purpose, says the author, "is to recognize 
and encourage the loyalty of seasoned alum- 
ni, not to discourage the acquisition of new 
blood, red or blue." 

There are also many families with more 
than one representative presently at David- 
son. Families such as the Wilsons, Waddills, 
Evans, Hays, Macks, Spencers, McArns, 
Hoopes, and many others have at least two 
brothers or sisters, or one of each, here. While 
some of them try to avoid each other, most of 
them get along well. In fact, two of the three 
Hoopes sisters room together on first Cannon. 



Sometimes the younger siblings squirm under 
the initially watchful eyes of their older broth- 
ers or sisters, but eventually they get used to 
having each other around, and tend to go their 
separate ways. Freshman Jennifer Spencer, 
whose brother Geoff is a junior here, said, 
"Really, the only trouble with having Geoff 
here is in making sure our stories match in 
our letters home." 

— Caroline Boudreau 

PASSING ON THE DAVIDSON TRADITION. David, 
Margaret, and Alex Evans share a rare moment together. 
It is rumored that another Evans may join the DC clan 
next year. 






^ 



{ 



Get A Fix! 



Dora, a darling Davidson coed, arose with 
only half an hour before class. So, after fixing 
her hair, she grabbed a cup of coffee and ran 
out the door. 

Ten o'clock finds Dora on her way to the 
Post Office. Great! The new issue of Glamour! 
She stops by Rexall for a chocolate bar and 
sits to read. 

The rushed morning has transformed into a 
lazy, sunshiny afternoon. Dora decides it's a 
perfect day for the lake campus, so, armed 
with books, Coppertone, and a jug of Lipton, 
she heads out. 

Several hours later, without much studying 
behind her, but the base of a great tan begun, 
Dora returns to campus. After supper it looks 
like it's going to be a long night . . . Dora 
grabs a couple Tabs and stakes out a place in 
Chambers. 

(Jgh — 12:00 and at least two more hours 
of work . . . "But, you've gotta' do what 
you've gotta' do," sighs Dora . . . she gulps a 
No-Doze and settles to work. 

Coffee . . . chocolate . . . tea . . . Tab . . . 
No-Doze . . . Darling Dora is dangerously 
close to joining the ranks of the number one 
Davidson druggies — the caffeine addicts. 

Caffeine has become the most universally 
used drug on campus. But everyone intakes 
some caffeine ... so how much is too much? 

Dr. Williams of the Davidson infirmary 
states that although it varies among indivi- 
duals, anything over 500 mg. a day (about 3 
cups of coffee) will lead to adverse effects. 
These effects include subtle expressions of 
tension, mainly depression and anxiety. 

Such symptoms are present around cam- 
pus. Perhaps they're just part of a student's 
ever-active lifestyle . . . but it probably 
wouldn't hurt to refuse that last extra cup of 
coffee . . . would it? 

-Lisa Sloan 




DO DROGS! With the help of caffeine, cigarettes 
Doze, any conscientious student should be able 
it through an all-nighter. 



, and No- 
to make 




Liij A Hdily 



W Henidrnin Hatrhpt 



Mark P Hayes 



Ptitricia C Haynes 



J Mark Heavner 



p„n^«> L Hpdgppeth 



Seniors 299 



Charlotte C. Hemenway 



Karen L. Hester 



Kathleen D. Hoffman 



Julie L. Holding 



John C. Holland 



Linda L. Hoopes 






V \ 






Good Morning, Davidson 







1^ .!^ .-■«■ 




College 



9J 



If Evva McKinley collected a penny for 
every time she said "Good morning. David- 
son College", she would be a rich woman 
today. Evva is our switchboard operator; 
she is the friendly voice that you hear ev- 
ery time you dial 892-2000 in the daytime. 
Sitting in her tiny office in Chambers in 
front of a bristling switchboard, Evva says 
that claustrophobia apart, she loves her 
job. She seems to know almost everyone 
who calls in, and wherever possible, recog- 
nises the disembodied voice and calls the 
person by name. "Most people are nice," 
she says, "but every once in a while I get a 
crank. The busiest times of the day are 
ten o'clock in the morning and four o'clock 
in the afternoon; but Friday, Friday after- 
noon is what I call Hysteria Time," she 
says with a smile. Yet she says the sum- 
mers are boring, because she misses the 
people. 

Evva originally intended her job with Da- 
vidson to be temporary, but so far she has 
been at the college for six and half years. "I 
decided to work, just to get out of the 
house, " she says, "and I am still here!" 

-Katie Tully 



FAITHFULLY AT HER SWITCHBOARD. Evva 
McKinley manages a cheerful smile on the job. 




Seniors 301 



David S. Hoskins 
J. Turley Howard 
Philip T. Howerlon 
Edward P. Imbrogno 
Catharine G. Inabnet 
Margaret W. Jackson 




The $200.00 Question 



What Happened To My Laundry This Week? 



Clean Clothes! A Davidson student's 
rigorous routine is often highlighted by 
that stroll down to the laundry to re- 
trieve his laundry. What a devastating 
disappointment it is to go to the laundry 
in hopes of finding clean clothes only to 
find out that yours is not on the shelf! 
The whole day is dampened. But — on 
the other hand — when he does see a 
brown paper bundle with his very own 
laundry number on it, he knows that 
things are going his way! Eager to find 
out what surprises await him inside the 
bundle, the student can hardly wait to 
get to his room before ripping the brown 
paper. Will the shirt that has always 
been too large fit snuggly today? How 
many buttons have survived the ordeal? 
How many new socks are there to be 
added to the mismatches? 

The many benefits of the college-run 
laundry service are sometimes over- 
looked as Davidson's students joke and 
complain about the system. The burden 
of washing clothes could become un- 
bearable for some students! They'd 
rather wear the same pair of dirty blue 
jeans for weeks than sacrifice valuable 
study time to washing and folding 
clothes. Also, the freshmen are faced 
with enough traumas during Orientation 
without having to be rudely introduced 
to the washing machine and dryer. Da- 
vidson students should be thankful for 
the Laundry — their campus is a much 
cleaner place because of this fine ser- 
vice! 

— Reaves Robinson 



EMDLESS SHELVES OF BROWN BUNDLES 

crowd the Davidson Laundry. The bundles await 
the onrush of eager students anxiously coming to 
claim their clean clothes for the week. 



^N.^ 




302 PEOPLE 




Seniors 303 





This Davidson College Woman 
Needs No Introduction 



On June 28, Janet Ward Black '81 became 
Janet Ward Black '82. 

The rising senior economics major won't 
return to campus this year with her class, due 
to a fortuitous event at the Miss North Caroli- 
na Pageant: she won! 

"I'm sorry I won't finish school with my 
closest friends," Black said, "but I'll be back 
for Homecoming and graduation, and it's not 
really like I'm interrupting my education." 

The coming year full of appearances, 
speeches, competitions and communications 
which will keep her away from Davidson 
could qualify her for a doctoral degree in man- 
agement, if not sociology. 

But Black doesn't begrude the pace. The 
honor of selection and spoils of victory con- 
pensate her as well. As Miss North Carolina, 
she receives $5,000 in scholarships ("for Da- 
vidson and law school"), a diamond ring, 
mink jacket, wardrobes, silver and modeling 
lessons. 

Considering her amateur pageant competi- 
tion status. Black felt privileged to win. Just a 
year ago, she was deeply immersed in studies 
at Davidson. Then she resolved to enter pag- 
eants as a way to refine her skill at the piano 
and build her body back into the shape it 
seemed to be falling out of. 

Like any athlete devoted to a goal, she 
trained several hours each day outside of 
class. Much of that time was given up to 
piano practice and sweat. 

The set up for her grandest achievement so 
far was winning the Miss Charlotte-Mecklen- 
burg Pageant in the spring, which qualified 
her for the Miss North Carolina competition. 
She also competed in the Miss America Pag- 
eant where she won the talent award. 



(Davidson Update, August 1980) 

— Katie Tully 

CHARMING SMALL CHILDREN AND LARGE 
CROWDS is one of the pleasures of a beauty 
queen. Janet Ward Black returned to Davidson for 
Homecoming and took part in the festivities. 

SHIMMERING WITH BEAUTY, yet another Da 
vidson student proves her excellence. Hours upon 
hours of hard work paid off for Janet Ward Black, 
as she was crowned Miss North Carolina. 1981. 





Paul K Jamtkon 



Karen P Johnion 







James L Jones 




Peter M. Jordan 




Margaret A Karis 




Jonathan S. Keith 




R Bryan Kelleher 




Glenn O. Kellum 
Joseph M, Kenney 
George A, Kent 
Bradford M. Kerr 
E. Anne Kessler 
James T. King 




Tragedy Dampens Traditional Beer Bash 








The annual spring term blow-out, known to 
everyone as "Hattie's Might", turned into a trage- 
dy this year, as a sophomore Joe Leman was 
shot in the chest by a local construction worker. 
Hundreds of people attended the event at F & M 
on the first Thursday of the term, which com- 
memorates the night of April 27th. 1975, when 
Hattie's, Davidson's most popular bar, burned 
down. According to Davidson College Security 
Chief Jackie Hughes, the shooting occurred 
shortly after 12:30 AM, when four construction 
workers began throwing beer at students. Leman 
and the four went outside to the porch where, 
after a brief altercation. Leman was shot at point- 
blank range with a .38 caliber handgun. "I never 
even saw the gun," said Leman. "just a flash and 
a bang." He was taken to Charlotte Memorial 
Hospital, where he was reported to be in satisfac- 
tory condition. Leman plans to return to school 
to complete spring term. 

The fate of Hattie's Night, which has never 
been secure, now hangs in the balance. Propos- 
als have been made to change the party's format 
to improve security; such proposals include 
moving the location of the party, limiting it to 
Davidson students, and changing the date. Con- 
trolling numbers by means of checking ID's has 
also been suggested. College officials have also 
proposed that beer be served only from nine 
until one. Whatever changes are made concern- 
ing Hattie's Night will certainly be made in the 
best interests of the students. 

— Katie Tully 

AMIDST THE MASSES CROWDING F & MS 
ON HATTIE'S NIGHT. Barbara Cape. Liz Up 
church, and Mike Mealy seem to be in the spirit of 
things 




Married Life Begins On Davidson Campus 



Students Married!? ... at Davidson? 
. . . yes, and its working! "This year's been 
a better year than the other three," says 
Rob Fields, married since August 1980. 

What are some of the significant 
changes in his life over the last year? Well, 
one is that he's got a wife, and somehow 
being a family sheds a different light on 
school. "School is not as big a part of our 
life as it once was." Ironically enough, 
though, a life more or less separate from 
school has produced a more conducive at- 
mosphere for studying. The newlyweds 
find that not only do they have more time 
to study, but also extra time for leisure, a 
rare commodity in a single students sched- 
ule. 



Drawbacks have been few but most deal 
with the fact that married students are 
somewhat isolated from campus and the 
rest of the student body. No longer living 
with other students, there is less contact 
on a day to day basis with others. Beth 
Fields has felt the loss of this contact in 
one of her courses. Without students al- 
ways around to talk about the class, she 
felt she missed out on some of the insights 
that are generated out of class. 

The problem of isolation might be solved 
with more interaction between the married 
student couples themselves. The Fields 
point out that is difficult, however, be- 
cause of the small number of married stu- 
dents and their diverse backgrounds and 



situations. More opportunity for interac- 
tion may appear next year though, as three 
student couples will reside in the married 
housing b)ehind Grey House. 

Through adjustments with their single 
friends, new financial burdens and the ex- 
citment of being newlyweds, Rob and Beth 
Fields are very happy with their life as 
married students. "So many people 
warned us . . . but it hasn't been nearly as 
hard as we thought it would be" ... in 
fact, it's been the best year so far!" 

-Lisa Sloan 

TOASTING THEIR NEW LIFESTYLE, newlyweds, 
Rob and Beth Fields, do not allow the pressures of 
Dvidson to infringe upon their happiness. 





%. 



J 



Terry A Kno« 



C Barton Landess 



Wanda G Langley 



E Allison Lewis 



Edward H. Lindsey. Jr. 



Harold A Lloyd 



William E Loftin. Jr 




C. Vincent Long, 



Karen J. Long 



Carol J. Loptson 



Stephen G. Lowe 



Fashions Of Species 



310 PEOPLE 



In analyzing dress styles at Davidson, the 
empirical approach has been found to be the 
most accurate and revealing of what typifies 
Davidson fashion. Within the species homo- 
Davidsoniens one would be justified in mak- 
ing three basic sub-divisions as regards 
"markings" or varieties of coat. Whether 
these markings are congenitally determined 
where our infant subject first enters the world 
encased in either broadcloth, sweatcloth. or 
denim is difficult to determine, as the parents 
of their breed seem rarely to release their 
young before some degree of maturity is 
reached. However, we are all familiar with the 
three varieties of adolescent specimen ^ re- 
specively Pritchard Prep, 111, Jack Jock, Jr., 
and Buzz Bohemian. 

Young Pritchard Prep is easily recognized 
by his unfortunate birthmark, which he bears 
upon his left pectoral and the shape of which 
has often suggested an amphibian or equine 
life-form. Embarrassment occasioned by this 
stigmata often leads to the donning of an 
overgarment or "epiderm", often distinctly 
striped and with an unusual flap — not unlike 
the crested newt's "frill" which he fastens 
down on either side of the Adam's apple, by 
way of two small callouses. 

On the lower portion of Pritchard's body — 
somewhat in the manner of a badly wrapped 
parcel — the skin (often khaki in hue) is bare- 

"BOZZ BOHEMIAN" His jeans are held together by three 
threads, his feet are well worn, and his hair style is a la 
blown by the breeze. Parks Snead does not model the 
Bohemisn style; he embodies it. 



ly attached to the inner form and seldom 
reaches below the ankle-bone. The feet are 
leathery in appearance and often "laced" 
with a hide-like sinew. The sole of the foot is 
curiously corrugated, as though in some for- 
mer incarnation they were once a sea-family 
creature and needed a steady grip on kelp- 
covered terrain. 

Jack, by contrast, is very much at home, it 
seems, on land. Seemingly tireless, he en- 
gages in ceaseless physical activity, as 
though like a shark he must move constantly 
just to stay alive. His lifestyle has determined 
a distinctive body covering which instantly 
identifies him. The upper portions of the body 
are scantily covered with the midriff and low- 
er arms bare. A warm cellular husk (often 
bearing numerals) clings to pulsing pectorals 
and skims bulging biceps. Around the head a 





Homo- Davidsoniens 



bright layer of chitin attaches itself — the 
bandana or second cerebral shell. 

From the waist down, he is a bifolliate: the 
legs are entirely encased in more of the cellu- 
lar, sweat absorbing membrane, and their up- 
per portion additionally protected with tightly 
bound cloth. His feet are designed for pound- 
ing the astro-turf and are generally covered in 
a callous known as Mike. 

Buzz owes his epiderm to the work of bio- 
genetics expert Levi-Strauss. Before Levi's in- 
vention of an artificial skin substitute, this 
species always died at birth, unable to weath- 
er the "bad vibes" inherent in everyday life. 
Apart from this distinctive blue "skin", some- 
times caressing the entire body, but more 
usually only the legs. Buzz bears a distinctive 
birthmark of his own. On the loose folds of 
upper-body skin he will almost always bear 



the legend THE GRATEFUL DEAD, in loving 
memory of all his brothers lost in infancy 
before the life-saving discovery of denim. The 
only visible reminders of his own naked past 
are Buzz's bare feet: like Achilles' heel. These 
are the only evidence of his maturity. 

Any classifications gross over individual 
traits, and this is no exception. There are 
1 ,000 ways in which individuals of the species 
home — Davidsoniens vary in their biological 
make-up. To all the genetic mutations, my 
appologies. I salute your differences which 
are all the more admirable in the face of such 
general conformity. 

-Miranda Morrison 



••PRITCHARD PREP. Ill" Model Dewayne Jimison (who 
swears he borrowed these clothes) reveals the standard 
epiderm of this subdivision of HomoDavidsoniens. 



i 



\r. 




\ 





Charles T. Luecker 

David W. Lyons 

Susan H. McArn 

Benjamin W. McCall, Jr. 

J. Martin McCoy 

Patrick D. McKinsey, Jr 



312 PEOPLE 





MOW THAT'S ITALIAN! Homemade pizza beats the 
snackbar cardboard variety — just ask Cuyler Calton. 
The cooking area and utensils may be limited, but inde- 
pendent cooking provides for variety in dining. 



Creative 
Cuisines 

Independent eating at Davidson has taken 
on several forms, from the full-time indepen- 
dents who prepare and eat all their meals in 
their rooms or houses, to the weekend dining 
clubs (like the Cosmic Cuisine Club and The 
Davidson Continental Diners) who cook when 
the houses on Patterson Court don't. There 
are also a variety of reasons for independent 
eating from special diets to conflicting sched- 
ules, from friendship to the "experience" of 
cooking "on your own," and from lack of 
money to lack of space on the Court. (Slater 
never was a tremendously palatable alterna- 
tive, but many chose that route anyway). Eat- 
ing by yourself because no one will join you, 
however, does not constitute indefjendent eat- 
ing. 

Besides the forms of and reasons for inde- 
pendent eating, there are also a variety of 
means of accomplish this task. Often the 
larger groups will use the kitchens of their 
respective eating houses or the kitchens in 
Belk, Cannon, Carnegie or the off-campus 
houses. The variety of facilities in individual 
dorm rooms, however is amazing. Besides the 
fact that almost every room has a refrigerator 
and a hot pot, and every other room has a 
popcorn popper, there are also hot plates, 
taster ovens, fondue sets, woks, grills, and 
even microwaves. With a little ingenuity and 
few utensils, independent eaters have created 
(and sometimes destroyed) almost every deli- 
cacy to delight the palate from P B & J to 
chicken cordon bleu. 

-Jeff Jordan 



David C. McLean. Jr 



Douglas C McPherson 



W. Clay Macaulay 



Randolph A Malone. IV 



Penny K. Mandell 



Louise S Mann 



Deborah G. Marshall 




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Ha <y^^K 


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This Years Best 
Cinematic Art: 
Movies And TV 

Yes, it was quite a year for ttie Cinema Fine 
films. Friday night pop movies and numerous 
Charlotte theaters provided Davidson stu- 
dents with ample opportunity to view a wide 
variety of cinematic art. Television, as well as 
the Visulite Theater of Charlotte, presented 
quite a few golden oldies and classic films. 

A simple listing of the fine films and Friday 
night pop movies shows the extraordinary 
selection provided right here on campus. 
Some of the highlights of the Fine films In- 
clude; 2001: A Space Odyssey. Hamlet. The 
Magic Flute, Psycho. A Night at the Opera, 
East of Eden. The Seventh Seal. My Brilliant 
Career, and Dr. Strangelove. The list of Fri- 
day night pop films included: Mash. All the 
President's Men, Network. Life of Brian. Go- 
ing in Style, Young Frankenstein, One Flew 
Over the Cuckoo's Nest, A Clockwork Or- 
ange, Annie Hall, Being There, Hair, Black 
Stallion, Jesus Christ Superstar, and All 
That Jazz. 

Another medium which makes films avail- 
able on campus is television. Although few 
students take time out from their studies to 
watch madefor-TV movies, they often take 
the time to see specials and classic movies. 
Some of choice selections in this category 
were: Masada (on the Destruction of Jerusa- 
lem in 70 A.D.), Dr. Zhivago. Peter and Paul, 
The Ten Commandments and that greatest of . 
classics. Gone With The Wind. Masada prob- 
ably amassed the greatest following here at 
Davidson. 





w 







■^ 



A less popular (but important for the cine- 
ma) presentation was the Academy Awards 
on March 31 of this year in which Ordinary 
People walked away with "best movie, " "best 
director" (Robert Redford), and "best support 
ing actor" (Timothy Hutton). Robert DeNiro 
was voted "best actor" for his part as the 
boxer in The Raging Bull, and Sissy Spacek 
was voted "best actress" for her portrayal of 
Loretta Lynn in Coal Miner's Daughter. 

In answer to the question of what Davidson 
students considered the most outstanding 
movies of the year, my survey resulted in a 
"top five" which included: first. Ordinary Peo- 
ple (in agreement with the Academy), second. 
The Empire Strikes Back (which won an 
Academy Award for its special effects), third, 
Tess. fourth. Coal Miner's Daughter, and 
fifth. Elephant Man. Other movies that just 
missed the "top five" were All That Jazz, 
Nine to Five. The Competition, and Being 
There. 

One last point of interest is the Visulite 
Theater of Charlotte, which offers a wonder- 
ful potpurri of foreign, "off-the-wall," and 
great classic films. This year's list included: 
Watership Down, The Wizard of Oz, Law- 
rence of Arabia, My Fair Lady, Camelot, 
That's Entertainment, Casablanca, Looking 
for Mr. Goodbar, Play It Again, Sam, Fame, 
and once again, the ever popular Gone With 
The Wind. The Visulite is less popular with 
students relative to regular theaters, pop 
films. Fine films, and probably even televi- 
sion, but it provides a refreshing alternative 
and, often, great fun. 

-Craig Adams 

ROLL 'EM. TAKE ONE. Davidson provided a variety of 
popular films and classic flicks for ttie students to enjoy. 
As projectionist Debby Eisenbise starts tfie film, tfie row- 
dy Davidson audience quiets down, ready to boo and hiss 
tfie bad guys. 





Rekindled Bonfire Lacks Spontaneity 



On February 6th, 1980, Davidson College 
made the newspapers all over the state be- 
cause of a "party" the students had held the 
preceding night. A blackout had occurred on 
campus, and those less devoted students 
who were not studying by flashlight, built a 
bonfire in front of Sentelle Dorm. The stu- 
dents made the papers because of a disagree- 
ment with the Davidson firemen that resulted 
in the throwing of beer bottles. 

When February 5th rolled around this year. 



the anniversary did not go unrecognized. The 
Dean's Office got wind of the intention to 
rebuild the bonfire, and Dean Terry, for the 
sake of safety, had an organized bonfire built 
in front of PAX and supplied kegs of beer for 
the pyromaniacs. The bonfire revival did not 
draw as much of a crowd as had the original, 
but then the orginal had had the advantage of 
spontaneity. Everyone had to admit that the 
second bonfire made for an unusual Thursday 
night, and it was almost certainly the largest 



marshmallow roast ever held at Davidson. It 
could it be that a new tradition is beginning 

■Caroline Boudreau 

IT WAS SO COLD THE KEGS FROZE the night David 
son rekindled a bonfire in honor of the February 5, 1980 
blaze 1980 blaze in front of Sentelle. Bill Appleton and 
Ben Dishman were there to commemorate the occasion. 




v. A] 



Jeffery W. Morn 



Terry A. Morrow 



Ralph S. Mosca 



Christiane Moussalli 




Sally R. Meal 



Pelir t Neefus 




Sun 
Worshippers 

The spring has come 
And winter gives way, 
The sun shines forth — 
I hear and obey. 

I run to my drawers, 
Root deep through the clothes. 
Some are faded, some are worn, 
The brightest I choose. 

And now for the glasses — 
Grab a towel off the line, 
Then jump in the car — 
Must be there in time. 

The sacred cloth is spread — 
Upon the table of sand. 
The ritual suit adorned 
And with the bottle in hand. 

1 annoint myself with oil. 
Put on glasses — and it's done. 
A willing, prostrate sacrifice 
To be burned by the glaring sun. 
■Lisa Sloan 



PROPERLY USHERING IN THE SPRING, sunbath 
erb take maximum advantage of the sun's warm rays. 
Sprawling tanned bodies, from flickerball fields to 
dorm balconies, become a familiar sight during 
Springtime 




Frisbee Golf 



Davidson College remains famous for its 
rigorous academic standards, its dispropor- 
tionately large share of Rhodes Scholars, the 
basketball teams under Lefty Driesell, and its 
College Bowl champions. Davidson can also 
boast of one of the most outstanding frisbee 
golf courses in the Southeast, a beautiful lay- 
out of 18 holes amid majestic oaks, verdant 
lawns, and blossoming dogwoods. The D. 
Grier Martin Memorial Frisbee Golf Course, 
named after a former Davidson president and 
avid frisbee enthusiast, challenges righthand- 
ers, southpaws, distance specialists, and fi- 
nesse artists alike. 

The first Annual Davidson Frisbee Golf 
Tournament, held in 1979 was an undisputed 



success. With about fifty players participat- 
ing, the tournament was well on its way to- 
ward becoming as much a Davidson tradition 
as coffee and cokes, Thursday night discos, 
and Will Terry. "Frisbee Golf Fever" quickly 
gripped the entire campus, and soon the 
whole dormitory halls were trying their hands 
at the sport. 

The Second Annual tournament was an 
even greater success and featured television 
coverage for the first time. Andrew Schorr of 
WBTV in Charlotte produced a Carolina Cam- 
era feature of the event which was aired sev- 
eral times in the next few months. 

In 1980, the Black Student Coalition spon- 
sored the Third Annual Frisbee Golf Tourna- 
ment. Due to the construction of the Com- 
mons, a new course has yet to be designed, 
and the Fourth Annual Davidson Frisbee Golf 



Tournament will have to wait for 1982. Tour- 
nament founder and frisbee golf course archi- 
tect David Huie has agreed to design a brand 
new course for next year. More importantly, 
the incoming freshman class features a 
bumper crop of bluechip high school frisbee 
golf recruits. With such promising signs on 
the horizon, Davidson College is well on its 
way toward becoming a major NCAA power 
in frisbee golf. 

-David Huie 



IT'S ALL IN THE WRIST A well executed wind-up. as 
Tom Leonard reveals, is essential to the accuracy of the 
frisbees flight. 





John T. Newcomb 
John F. Niblock 
Nicholas A. Nicolette 
Agnes W. Norfleet 
Mary M. Oliver 
Lisa Olson 



A Kirby Owen 



Lynn E. Peace 



Walter D. Phari 



Anna C- Phipps 



Julia T. Pidgeon 



Diana P. Pierce 



Jeanne L- Plowden 





Campus Flora 

Well, we made it! Not quite the cover of 
Rolling Stone, but one has to start some- 
where, and Southern Living makes a fine 
launching pad. 

Davidsons apperance on the cover of the 
October 1980 issue of Southern Living was 
well justified. The campus boasts outstanding 
fall colors, erupting from the many Acera 
ceaes, acer saccharum (suger maple), being 
the most colorful and acer barbatum (Florida 
maple), also being quite prevalent. Although 
the large old acer saccharinum (Silver maple) 
was removed from just opposite the post of- 
fice last fall, a wide variety of maples is still 
present, including the more unusual acer pla- 
tanoides (Norway maple), in the front lawn of 
the Women's Center, and acer nigrum (Black 
maple) beside the Richardson Stadium. 

Aside from the Aceraceae, the immediate 
campus supports terrific Quercus for shade, 
and built-in squirrel food (acorns). Numerous 
Prunus species are found all over campus. 
None has commonly edible fruits, although 
Botany professor Dr. Daggy has been known 
to munch on various kinds from time to time. 

Spring color is brilliant behind Martin Sci- 
ence Building, with the pink and white cornus 
florida (Dogwood) and common Rhododen- 
dron calendulacelum and Rhododendron rudi- 
florum (azaelias). Pyrus coronaria (crabap- 
ples) adorn Richardson Plaza with spring per 
fume and color. 

In addition to the more prevalent species, 
unique surprises such as the Cunningham lan- 
ceolate in front of D.C.P.C. should be a high- 
point in every student's walk to the P.O. or 
perhaps one takes more notice of the Betula 
pendula behind the Chemistry building. Out 
of its native habitat, this little birch is honored 
with an island all of its own in the middle of 
the brick walkway. And if. perchance, both of 
these have eluded the Davidson student, 
there is one species that most know very well; 
better, in fact, than they would care to. The 
Ficus benjamina requires little pruning or 
work, but is always fresh and green to greet 
its guests in the foyer of E.H. Little. 

-Lisa Sloan. 




MAJESTIC ACERACEAES ABOUND on the campus 
providing shady spots m which to relax, take a nap. or to 
do some people watching 



Seniors 323 




The Community Life of Main Street, USA 



Wouldn't it be informative if the campus 
tours included the town as well? It wouldn't 
make the tours last much longer, since you 
can cover the whole town in a stroll down 
Main Street . . . 

' . . . and across Main Street from the cam- 
pus is the town of Davidson." 

"You mean this is it?" the visitors would 
probably ask. 

"Yes. For all practical purposes, Davidson, 
North Carolina is this part of the street which 
includes four traffic lights and the businesses 
and offices that comprise a small town. It has 
a couple of realtors, a lawyer's office, two 
insurance agencies. Piedmont Bank, Duke 
Power, an electric company, and the Mecklen- 
burg Gazette." 

"What about night life?" 

"Well, there's the Peregrine House, a park, 
and a cemetary, but really, I guess there isn't 
a night life — the College has a monopoly on 
that in Davidson." 

"So what do the students do on Main 
Street?" 

"The Post Office here is our life line to the 
real world. Right next door, the old Carolina 
Inn is the Center for Special Studies. There 
are all kinds of shops in which to find useful 
and unusual things . . . Parks Rexall Drug- 
store, the Yellow Caboose which sells novel- 
ties, the Glass Emporium, Mary Mac's Dress 
Shop, the Needlecraft Center, the Clay Cat. 
and the Village Store. There are also places 
whose services we use, like the Greyhound 
Bus Station, Norton's Barber Shop, the florist, 
M & M, and the two gas stations. 

"How come every thing looks like Time 
stopped here thirty years ago?" 

"I don't know; maybe it did ..." 

•Caroline Boudreau 

REDaCE SPEED — INTERSECTION AHEAD. David 
son, a thriving metropolis boasts of two major through- 
fares which handle massive traffic congestion. 





Patrick A. Pope 
Kevin R Pressley 
David T Prettyman 
James D. Reich. Jr. 
David F. Rhodes 



5^ninrR ^PS 



David K. Roberts. Ill 



Lindsay G- Robertson 



D. Annes Robinson 



William A, Robinson 



Karen A. Sandlin 



J Yates Sealander 



Michael M. Sharp 



326 PEOPLE 





Peculiar Pets 

Bill Bolding. close your eyes and pass to 
the next page. One cannot be oblivious to the 
stray cats around the campus and the "dorm 
dogs" who are claimed by five or six nebulous 
masters, but there are many other pet species 
lurking throughout the dorms which provide 
special companionship for the students who 
live with them. 

One of the largest families of these species 
resides in Belk dorm. These creatures are not 
confined to a single room, though. Mo . . . 
they inhabit, rule, and might eventually con- 
quer the whole dorm complex. The base of 
their operations has never been located; it is 
suspected that they have mobile control units 
which do not necessarily confine themselves 
to Belk, but may, in fact, frequently set up 
communications in basement Cannon and 
Watts. Who are these industrious workers 



who are determined to unite and build an 
insect empire? Mone other than the well- 
known black ants who seek love and accep- 
tance as they prowl through students' person- 
al belongings {i.e., foodstuffs) when backs are 
turned. The night raid is a successful tactic 
employed by this species, and many a kami- 
kazeant has been smashed as he risked his 
life for the last buttered popcorn kernels in 
the bottom of the bowl. 

But, enough of the rising ant bourgeoisie; 
despite its abundance, the students have 
some control over it in the form of foot stomp- 
ing and "Raid" asphyxiation. Regardless of 
the present situation, Belk should remain hu- 
manly habitable for at least a few more years, 
so we move on to our next species. 

"Monty" is one of her kind around David 
son. She lives in Sentelle with Van Wagner, 
and although she is only five feet long, now, 
she has the potential to be twenty-five feet 
long and weigh up to three hundred pounds. 



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For those of you with weak imaginations and 
who have not looked at the picture yet, 
"Monty" is a python — reticulated python. 
Only a couple of months old, Monty is a very 
independent youngster. Though she spends 
much of her time in a warm cage, she is 
allowed romps in the grass with master Wag 
ner and she enjoys crawling around Wagner's 
shoulders and affectionately hissing in his 
ear. 

Monty has been well received both around 
campus and at the Wagner home. She has 
been so well received at the Wagner home, in 
fact, that the Wagner's are purchasing an- 
other python which they will later mate with 
Monty. 

The python is fed a live rodent each month 
which the snake kills and then swallows 
whole. Presently, Wagner buys mice from a 
local pet shop, but he plans to begin raising 
mice this summer to cut down on feeding 
costs. 

In addition to Monty, Wagner also keeps 
another interesting pet in his first Sentelle 
dorm room: a chameleon. The chameleon is a 
new addition to the growing Wagner zoologi- 
cal home. Its diet of crickets explains the 
recent rise of complaints about a new wave of 
music emerging from Sentelle. The com 
plaints have not been too vocal, however, as 
Monty is an effective deterrent for those who 
would tend to exaggerate any inconven- 
iences. And "exaggeration" is the correct 
phrase, for Wagner has done an excellent job 
of taking care of his pets while, simultaneous- 
ly, respecting the rights of his hallmates. 
Such a lesson is important and essential both 
for the students" well-being . . . and the pets! 
-Lisa Sloan 

SSSLIP AROarHD MY SSSHCKILDERS. SSSWEET- 
HEART. Monty. Van Wagner s pel python, gently plays 
with her master. Don t squeeze too hard, Monty 



Ann E. Sheaffer 



Patrick J. Sheridan 






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Mud, Beer, 

and Headball 

— Yuk! 

I've always been fascinated by Davidson 
and I've especially been fascinated with 
the people here: you know, their likes, dis- 
likes, hobbies. One "hobby" though, that 
I've been rather dumbfounded by is the 
affinity the "Davidson Gentlemen" have 
for mud. Mud hobbies include such fun, 
exciting, and messy events as Creeking, 
Mud Runs (alias Patterson Court Racing) 
and Headball. 

Creeking is most often done to someone 
who is celebrating some occassion, such 
as birthdays, announcements of engage- 
ment, and med school acceptances. What 
a great way to show affection and friend- 
ship: throwing somebody in the mud! I'M 
bet Cupid would never have thought of it! 

In fact, Creeking is such a lovely idea 
that someone decided to share it with 
those heretofore, unfortunate, non-birth- 
day people. (Jsually these are girls. And If 
the girls don't go to the mud, then the mud 
is brought to them, their hall, and their 
showers! 

Mud fun is made not only by using it to 
show endearment but also as a sport. Be- 
tween Headball and Mud Runs we've got a 
full line up for "Wide World of Sports. " 

Headball seems to be a cross between 
Quarters, Volleyball, and Kindergarten 
Cooking (i.e. mudpies). Mud Runs, on the 
other hand, consist of a multitude of drunk 
gentlemen (?) attempting to get from one 
side of Patterson Court to the other via a 
mudslide. Although females indirectly par- 
ticipate in this latter sport, there are none 
in the Headball organization. 

-Shannon Anderson 




328 PEOPLE 



PATTVCAKE, PATTYCAKE- Are Ihey leverling to child trealmeni fof their enlirp boditrs? They were toured in this court, David arvj William were served Iheii meal on the 
hood and the lost ait ol making mudpies. or are David state by the photographer at 6 00 pm after 4 hours of spot ji la inud 
Weitnauei and William Holloman |ust taking a mud pai k heavy drinking, and since 6 00 is the dining hour on ih>- 







^A 




Lake Campus 

Beckons To 

Sun-Starved 

Students 



When the warm air of Spring brings spring- 
tinne urges into the hearts of Davidson stu- 
dents, the Lake Cannpus is one of the places 
they go to satisfy these urges. The Lake Cam- 
pus offers many activities which get students 
away from the library and outdoors. The 
newest Is horseback riding; fourteen horses 
were moved to the Lake Campus last summer 
and are tended by students. Several horse- 
back riding classes are offered through the 
P.E. Department. On another part of Lake 
Norman, the Morth Carolina Waterski School, 
teaches students waterskling and procures 
for the sport some very faithful followers. 
Senior Dave Welchman, a ski instructor, said, 
"That lake was the main reason why I came 
back to school after my sophomore year." 
The Lake Campus also offers opportunities 
for sailing, swimming, cookouts, frisbee, the 
sand, and other summer activities like flirting 
and basking in the sun. The lake is a great 
place to go to get away from the world and 
relax when Springtime hits the Davidson cam- 
pus. 

•Caroline Boudreau 

HOT OFF THE GRILL! It may not be home cooking, but 
to Becky Love and her young sister, cook outs often 
surpass gourmet dining. 

GRAZING PREFERRED OVER STUDYING-Many a stu 
dent would rather live the leisurely life of the Davidson 
horses than stay couped up in the library studying. 




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A Glenn Simpson 
W Gregory Smart 
E. Follin Smith 
Theresa E. Smith 
William T Smith 
Winifred S. Smith 



Seniors 331 




Anne F Stdnbdtk 




Andrew E Slarnes 




Biett L Storm 




Samuel P Stuart. Jr 




Glenn E Summers, Jr 




James R Terry 




Robert B Thatcher 



Springstein, Benatar Sweep 
National Music Preferences 



"February 28, 1981, Greensboro, horth 
Carolina welconnes Bruce Springstein." The 
fans cheer, the music begins, and the 1980 
1981 artist of the year captures another huge 
audience with his talents and song. Besides 
being rated the Artist of the Year, Springstein 
received the titles for best male vocalist and 
songwriter according to the Rolling Stone's 
1980 Rock and Roll Reader s Poll. 

Other categories included: Best Band; E. 
Street; Best Album: Bruce Springstein's The 
River; Best ISew Artist: The Pretenders: Best 
Single: Bruce Springstein's Hungry Heart; 
Best Female Vocalist: Pat Benatar; Best Soul 
Artist: Stevie Wonder; Best Jazz Artist: 
George Benson; Best Country Artist: Willie 
Melson; and Best Instrumentalist: Jeff Beck. 
So that's the national trend, but how does 
Davidson taste in music compare? Based on 
the types of bands playing around Patterson 
Court and in the Union, Davidson interests 
appear more varied than those in the reader's 
poll. 

Music heard around the court included 
rhythm and blues by the Allstars and 



Rhythm Masters, beach music by the Cata- 
linas. and top forty hits by Blue Condition. 
Rock and roll appeared in many forms, 
among them, sixties rock by the Sponge- 
tones, southern rock by Badge and punk rock 
by the Orphans and the Fabulous Knobs. 
Soul, big band and country bands appeared 
infrequently — moreso in the union than on 
the court. 

Despite the wide variety of music, is there 
one type of music which is more p>opular 
throughout the campus than others? That's 
hard to say, but the majority of the responses 
to this question concluded that most students 
preferred rock and roll, southern rock in par- 
ticular. This was by no means a landslide 
victory though, and as a whole Davidson, re- 
flects a more unique and varied taste in music 
than that of the national trend. 

•Lisa Sloan 

DISCO TONIGHT IN THE 900 ROOM! Davidson stu 
dents have a wide variety of musical tastes, but at a 
Disco anything goes that the DJs — Douglas Baker. 
Tom Haller. and Steve Stine spin, that is. anything rowdy 
and conducive to dancing 





RCKKN-ROLL SUNOCO MEANS GOOD TIMES. Ren 
amed The Corner Tavern. Rock NRoll Sunoco provides 
an alternative to the 900 Room for students such as Jim 
Troutman. 




James A Tholen 
Maik C Thomas 
Rhell J Thompson 
John A Thomson 
Stuart A Tinkler 
Edward T Trumbull 



Local Hangouts Add Color To Nightlife 



Had we but worlds enough, and tinne. 
The campus night could be sublime, 

-Famous Plagiarist 

So it's Friday night again in Davidson — 
what are you going to do? Well, you could 
hang out with the guys at the water fountain, 
trying to discover which bodily secretions 
clog up the drain — Nah, you did that last 
week. Besides, there's always a chance you 
could still get a date; if she's a lot of fun, you 



could even take off your shirts and watch that 
fuzzy stuff accumulate in each other's navels. 
But you have always been embarrassed about 
your navel — it's an outie and everyone's else 
has an innie. Outies don't accumulate fuzzy 
stuff, and you just can't cope with the ridicule 
on a Friday night. 

Do you just sit in your room? Not if you're 
smart and privy to the greatest bit of divine 
revelation since the Ten Commandments: to 
wit, THE WEEKEND IS WHAT YOU MAKE 




IT. It was chided for all time on two Excedrin 
tablets, but somebody got headache # 124 
and now they're gone. No wonder you've 
been confused. 

Admittedly there are times when pre- 
planned campus activities are as sparse as 
Will Terry's hair; why do you think all those 
people stare at the ground when walking 
around winter term? It's got to be so they can 
watch the fungus grow in the sidewalk 
cracks-that's probably the most socially ac- 
tive organism in Davidson during the winter. 

But things need not be that way. Every 
week classic midnight movies ("Wet Midgets 
Go Wild, " "I Was a Teenage Spore ") grip the 
imagination of adventurous students. There's 
enough debauchery in Charlotte to keep ev- 
eryone satisfied, if only they were willing to 
seek it out. 

In our very own teeming metropolis sits the 
austere "Anchor Tavern," not to mention the, 
un, uninhibited "Rock N" Roll Sunoco." And 
why do you think the water tower is there? 
It's too rusty to hold water. It's too rusty to 
hold people as well, but heck, you only live 
once (if not for long). So be adventurous — 
these are your college years. Soon you'll have 
a job (well, maybe) and you'll be saddled. For 
life ridden by every dependent on your in- 
come tax return. As they say so eloquently in 
Belk, "Use it or lose it, bub." 

•Mike Mason 



COME JOIN THE FaN-The local clientele at The Corner 
Tavern drop by to relax with their friends after a long da . 
at work. 



David C. Turner 



Andrew N, (Jmhau 



Elizabeth A. Gpchurch 



James B. Vance 



Wendv VanVoorhees 



Ddvid H Waddill 



Robert b Wagon 





Wasting Time's No Lost Art 



MONDAY EVENING: 

"The test is Thursday, four days away. I 
don't have to study today, but I should I'll 
compromise and go to the library and 
talk." 
TUESDAY EVENING. 7:00: 

"Today is Tuesday He handed out ques 
tions to practice on for the test. I guess I'd 
better stay in my room tonight and work." 
TUESDAY EVENING. 8:00: 

"Boy, I probably needed that nap I feel 
great now! Let me just fluff up my pillows and 
then I'll get to work " 
TUESDAY EVENING. 9:00: 

"This is going so slow. I think I need a cup 
of coffee . . . mmmm . . . how about a snack 
with my coffee ..a sandwich . . .? no, pop- 
corn! It shouldn't take too long to make." 
TUESDAY EVENING, 10:00: 

"Hi Joe! Well, Joe, I really need to work. I 
haven't done too much tonight . . Well, all 
right . . . give me half an hour longer and I'll 
meet you in the 900 Room." 



WEDNESDAY EVENING. 7:00: 

"The last night I always thought that I 

worked best under pressure. Think III go to 
the Methodist Church for a while" 
WEDNESDAY EVENING. 8:30: 

"Sue? Well, sure you can ask me some 
questions. I can't believe you came all the 
way out here to find me." 
WEDNESDAY EVENING. 10:00: 

"Yeah, that was so funny . . and remem- 
ber the time when we . Sue! it's 10:00 
we'd better get to work How about a 7 11 

run and then we II hit the books? " 
THURSDAY MORNING. 9:00: 

"Sue's a neat girl, but all her chatter isn't 
going to help me to pass this thing. Two 
hours togo . we're talking saturation study 
time!" 
THURSDAY MORNING, 10:30: 

"This is ridiculous! I need breakfast more 
than any mind boggling theories ... Tm hit- 
ting the snack bar I'll look over my notes 
before I go to class. " 

-Lisa Sloan 

DOWr( WITH STUDYING! Todd Kimsey will sttelrh a far 
distance Iwfore opening a l>ook. anything to help his 
friends Dennis Swearengin and Sloan Warner waste Ijme. 





LSAT, MCAT, 



M.C.A.T. Four letters that quicken the 
pulse and strike terror into the heart of any 
self-respecting premed. But what effect would 
that have on the liver? The digestive system? 

L.S.A.T. If Farmer Brown's rooster lays an 
egg in Farmer Smith's barnyard, whose egg is 
it? And does anybody really care? 

GRE's, DAT's. Every department has its 
bane, a weapon to dangle threateningly over 
the heads of juniors and seniors just as they 
were beginning to think it was safe to slack 
off. As if it weren't enough to burn one the 
first time around, certain national organiza- 
tions feel it their bounden duty to grill the 
poor student a second time, in the form of 
lengthy multiple guess tests. Some, like the 
LSAT's, merely measure reading and reason- 




Ann B Walcott 



GRE Drain students' Energy 



ing abilities. The MCAT, on the other hand, 
nnight be compared to taking eight final ex 
ams on a single Saturday. Scores for a test of 
this nature might be a better indicator of en- 
durance than anything else. Even if one does 
manage to enter the test at 8:00 AM with 
some semblance of wit about him, by the time 
he finishes at 6:00 PM he is lucky to retain 
even an illusion of common sense. Most 
trudge out of Chambers determined to stay 
awake just long enough to celebrate the end 
of the ordeal. But not to be misleading, these 
aptitude tests don't actually consist of ten 
hours of testing. The correct proportion is 
closer to six of testing and four of the prover- 
bial red tape. Every time an individual leaves 
the room to go to the bathroom he must 



prove, on returning, that he is the same per 
son he was when he left. Yes, security is tight. 
After the spring session, junior test takers 
enjoy a month off before learning the ou 
come. Most of them already know how they 
did — just fine If the last seven answers to 
Part B were C. Mot to worry though, next fall 
there will be a second opportunity, both for 
those who missed it the first time around the 
for those who are simply masochists. 

•Karen Welty 

TAKING THESE TESTS IS NO FUN. Not only are the 
profebsional tests provided by the Educational Testing 
Service expensive, they are also time consuming and 
often nerve racking 



Robert S Waller 




Bernadette R. Walter 





David W Webb 




Julia E Webber 



^■^ r/^ 



i 




David B Welchman 



DCs Self Scheduled Exams — A Four Day 



The Honor Code is one of Davidson's most 
sacred Institutions, and one of the blessings 
(some may call it a mixed blessing) this insti- 
tution bestows upon the students is self 
scheduled exams. This method of taking ex 
ams is usually a novelty to the newcomer at 
Davidson, but the experience of living 
through several exam weeks teaches stu 
dents tips, or strategies, for how to live 
through an exam period successfully. 



1. The early bird catches the worm — and 
misses the line. Anyone who sees the line of 
people winding all over the first floor of Cham- 
bers before an exam period must think that 
Davidson students like to take exams. Get 
ting there early cuts down on the amount of 
time that you have to spend with nothing to 
do but talk about how nervous you are and 
how little you've studied. 

2. Bring money. Sometimes chocolate from 



the candy machine in the basement is just 
what you need in a mental crisis. 

3. Write to all your friends and relations a 
week prior to exams, and ask them to send 
you letters during the exam period. Finding 
mail in your mailbox feels good after a morn- 
ing exam. 

4. Put it off. If you don't want to take your 
exam right away, there are eight different 
exam times to choose from. It is entirely pos- 




Ordeal Of Mental Crisis And Long Lines 



sible to take all three of your exams on the 
last exam day or even in the last exam peri 
od. 

5. If you do finish your exams and go home 
early, you may want to take a copy of the 
Honor Code home to your parents to help 
explain why you can't talk about your exams 
when all the exams are in North Carolina and 
you're in New Jersey. 

6. When you're finished, and you have 



three Student Receipt cards in your hands, 
celebrate! Anyone from the Psych depart- 
ment can tell you that a night of partying is 
the best way to flush the residue of exams 
from your poor tired brain. 

-Caroline Boudreau 



STRATKGIC PLANNIfSG. LATE NIGHTS. AND WRIT- 
ERS' CRAMP all •unlribulF to the anxtrty ol tiiutt^ti 
wailing in lirxr foe the day's examt to begin 





Seniofs 341 



Davidson Graduates Face The Future And Wonder 

Is There A Life A.D. (After Davidson)? 



For the class of 1981, the Davidson Col- 
lege years have drawn to a close. Who 
could have ever foreseen back in the fall of 
1977 when we got our "first Davidson 
kiss" (remember the melting chocolate 
Kisses that the ten all-knowing upperclass- 
men gave us?) what was in store for us in 
the next four years? Certainly, the David- 
son experience has meant something dif- 
ferent for each member of the graduating 
class. And, although there have been mo- 
ments when we thought we would never 
get out of here, the time seems to have 
sped by all too quickly. 

We began the senior section of the 1981 
Quips and Cranks by revealing what it 
takes to make it at Davidson. The wisdom 
gained from the collegiate life is never 
something to be scoffed at, even if the 
methods used appear humorous and even 
ludicrous in retrospect. If the seniors truly 
were to publish a book for the edification 
of the underclassmen, it may very well be 
full of useful hints on the fine art of con- 
suming a keg or how to treat a prospective 
student. However, the one piece of vital 
information most likely to be included in 
such a book is that our life at Davidson is 
only what we, as students, make of it. Da- 
vidson provides many opportunities and 
restrictions simultaneously, but regardless 
of the situation, it is up to the students to 
strive to make the Davidson experience a 
fulfilling one. This one insight would be the 
most vital "pearl of wisdom" the seniors 
could pass on to those who follow them. 
This section of the book is designed not 
only to record who comprises the class of 
'81 but also to record the many events 
which comprise the entire collegiate exper 
ience. We described life at Davidson in our 
feature stories in terms of traditions, novel- 
ties, and in terms of the ordinary as these 
things influenced our academic and social 
lives. This section can help sustain the 
vivid memories of all that makes up life at 
Davidson. The question which now re- 
mains is: what is there to come? As Dr. 
Dan Rhodes, religion professor, so aptly 
describes it, "Is there life in the A.D. — 
after Davidson?" 

A survey taken of the class of 1981 by 
the Davidsonian projected 50% of those 
questioned were going on to graduate 
schools after Davidson. These students felt 
that Davidson had prepared them well for 
their future goals. 33% of the students 
were entering the job market upon leaving 
Davidson, and of these only 30% felt that 
Davidson had prepared them well for their 
career choices. 70% of them had not cho- 
sen their lifetime vocation, whereas almost 



all of those continuing their education in 
graduate schools had made a lifetime ca 
reer choice. 

The men of the group were overall more 
confident about their futures than the 
women. Only 10% of the job-oriented men 
did not feel prepared for their vocation, 
compared to 37% of the women. And, only 
25% of the students were anticipating mar- 
riage in the next year, while the majority of 
those were marrying their Davidson sweet- 
hearts. 

Yet, no poll or survey can answer the 
question as to where we will be in another 
4 years, who will we be in 1985 A.D? Will 
the next 4 or even 15 years make us glad 
to be out of Davidson or will they make us 
nostalgic for the good old days associated 
with the collegiate life? No matter where 
we end up, Davidson will have played a 
part of our lives. Four years is not a lot of 
time, admittedly, but it is enough to build a 
lifetime of memories. 

At any rate, as the commencement exer- 
cises loom ever larger as THE day itself 



approaches, many seniors scramble franti- 
cally to complete their P.E. requirements 
or pay that last parking ticket in order to 
graduate. Many seniors also begin to ask 
desperately: what's it all been for? The 
traditional slack senior spring term brings 
our time here to a close — one more set of 
exams, one last food fight down on the 
court, and one last all nighter. How will it 
all fit into the "afterlife? " 

Collectively, the class of '81 has sam- 
pled just about all there is to try here at 
Davidson, and, hopefully, the wide variety 
of experiences will ensure that there is life 
after Davidson; that, after all, there has 
been a reason for our Davidson experience. 
Personally, if one more person asks me 
what I'm going to be doing next year out in 
the REAL world, I'm gonna scream! By the 
way, you wouldn't happen to know of 
someone who needs an unemployed year- 
book staffer who has a liberal arts educa- 
tion, would you? 

-Nan Zimmerman 




WHO CARES ABOOT THE FaTORE? There may 
be life in the AD., but Ben McCall and David 
Hoskins seem to have a knack for living it up 
before leaving Davidson. 



Nancy M Wiighl 



hrwman M Yirlding, III 



Gregory M Zeph 




Index 



ABBERGCR. Wll 1 lAM W FST -. / 

-M-' 

XI9Scvcllc Pl.icc 

Orkindo. FL 32»(]4 
ABBOTT. ANTHONY S :i. ;«) 
ABERNATHY. CLAIRE DUDLEY 

30 Willway Ave 

Richmond. VA 2}22h 
ABFRNITHY. (aORGL L /W 
ABRAMS. JULII MARIE .'.'•/. JO 

lino NW :m Si 



, FL 



3605 



ADAM. MICHAIL. GREGORY .■•> 

I2SI Cornell Rd 

Bndgcwjlcr. NJ 01(807 
ADAMS. CRAKi STEWART If. :.■ 

1012 Marilyn Dr 

R.ilcigh. NC 27607 
ADAMS. JESSE EARL .<-'. .'.19 

224 N CrcM Rd 

Chjiumooga. TN 37404 
ADAMS. MARK THOMAS lOt 

57 Ml Lucas Rd 

Prmcclon. NJ 0X540 
ADAMS, VANESSA YVETTE .s'7. . 

1445 Harbin Rd 

AlLinla. GA 30311 
ADklNS. KATHRYN E A2. 144. I 

I Union Church Rd 

Salisbury. MD 2I.S0I 
ADMISSIONS OFUCE IKO 
ALDRIDGE. DAVID MALONt « 

Maddo« PO Bo« 1S5 



TYPOGRAPHY. In the following IncJex. entries in boWfaced capi- 
tals represent articles in the 1981 Quips and Cranks; entries in 
light-faced capitals represent people associated with Davidson 
College (students, professors, administrators, etc.). Page nunnbers 
follow the entries; italicized numerals represent a photo; regular 
numerals represent a reference in the copy. 



Mo 



. GA 31064 



ALEXANDER. ELIZABETH G J.'. 271. 28>) 
2140 Brookwood Rd 
Charkmc. Nt 2H2II 



ALEXANDER. HOOPER IV 5, 

6213 Carnapchousc In 

Charlollc. NC 2X21 I 
ALEXANIAN. JANE /r.J. 222. 

40X2 Brcakwood 

Houslon. TX 77025 
AIFORD. SHERA ANN 95. .'; 

Rl 13 Box 227<; 

Tallahassee. FL 32312 
ALLAN. MICHAFI ANSI FY 

27XX Ridgc Valley Rd NW 

Mlanla. GA .30327 
ALLEN. CRAIG FRENCH 124 

XX3 Indian River Dr 

Cocoa. EL 321122 
ALLEN. KATHERINF M ,V(i. 

60 

1754 Galloway Ave 

Memphis. TN 3X112 
ALLEN. NEWTON PERKINS 



').50 Audubon Dr 

Memphis. TN 3X1 17 
ALLEN. SHERMAN CLIFTON U. 70. gj. .\ 

/.56. 157. 2.!9 

48.50 Rimbcv Rd 

Fori Worlh. TX 7611') 
ALEIBONF. Wll LIAM PAUL ;/.5. JU 

307 Wylapyl Dr 

Hi-Ncila. NJ 0XI)X3 
Al TFR, PHll IP C HARFFS 6S. 1X7. 2.12. 2.? 

5225 Pipinp Rock 1 n 



Ho 



T\ 770' 



MTI/ER JAMI S WITTFN 

312 Rainbow Dr 

Slaunlon, VA 24401 
U.UMNl OFFICE I'M 
VMEEN. MICHAFI. SAIED : 

1X1 I Hobkirk Cl 

Camden, SC 2')020 



27/ 



AMES. MORTIMER P III 

Fiflh and Elkdalc 

Selma. Al, 36701 
AMMAR, DOLIGI AS BRIAN ,56, 



e Si 
, WV 



5312 



9775 HunlclilT Trace 

Allanla. GA .30338 
ANDERSON. SHANNON JOYCE 174. 

1 Slonybrook Dr 

(irecnvillc. SC 29615 
ANDERSON. WADE GUNNAR J6. Ilf 

2>S 

4 Smilh En 



He 



ad PI 



ANDREWS, GEOII DONALD, 

PO Box N44 

Nassau. Bahamas -0150 
ANDREWS. MARY C 

PC) Box N44 

Nassau. Bahamas 0150 
ANTFEV, RAY MIFIS JR .56. 



N (;i 



and , 



ap..lis, IN , 



India 
APO XX 
APPI ETON. WIFIIAM C .1)6. 

1025 Wesi Oulcr Dr 

Oak Ridpc. TN 37X30 
ARC HIE. JO IXI 
ARDUINI VINC E / " 
AREA I RK^I IREMKNTS 12 
AREA II RK.)I IRHMENTS 14 
AREA III RFyl IREMKNTS 16 
AREA IV REQl IREMENTS IX 
\RMISTI \D, DANNY (;/, 25 



Rl 9 Box 252 

Johnslon Cily. TN 37601 
ARTIST SERIES 152 
ASHIEY, BARBARA ALLEN 79. 112. III. 

131, 144, 224. 27.' 

I akeview Dr Rd, 2 

Co.ipersiown. NY 13326 
ASHWORTII. AMY SHERIDEN .'.'J 

604 Somcrscl Ave 

Richmond. VA 23226 
ASKEW. TRACY JEAN .'.'J. 7J. 7.5. .'.I.' 

2325 Hallmark Dr. 

Pcnsacola. EL 32503 
ASKINS. CHARLES GARLAND J9. .'7.'. 2X 

1906 Wesl B Si 

Bulncr. NC 27509 
ASTAPCHIK. PFTFR MKHAFE .'.I.' 

1903 S Apopka 



Invi 



, FF 32650 



ASU. MASAI J.I 

ATHLETIC DEPARTMENT 182 

ATKINSON. AFVIN FEE X7. 114. 

272. 273 

1611 London Si 

Brunswick. GA 31520 
ATO 42 
ATTAR. KEVIN GEORCiE U.x'. .'.!« 

35 Thomas Dr 

Chelmsford. MA 01824 
ATWOOD. ROXANA MFBANE // 

.17 

7510 June Si 

Springfield. VA 22150 
AUl.T. RUTH L 94. 197 
AUSTIN. JAMES DOUGLAS .^4. I 

4131 Dickey Rd, 

Gibsonia. PA 1.5044 
AUSTIN. STEPHEN WILLIAMS 1 

272. 27.1 

42X McNeill Si 




( 'Mpn(«lr Advr«t>«r«nmt 



Take it 
iiroinus! 

Think about textiles. 



Today, the textile business is a modem, 
innovative and exciting industry. 

Careers are numerous and cover a 
broad range of fields. Opportunities for 
advancement are greater now than ever 
before. 

This is why we are suggesting that 
you consider textiles for your career 
Today, many Davidson College graduates 
have leading jobs in the industry. 

We are pleased to be a part of the 
American textile industry. We are a 
group of three yam spinning companies 
that manufacture high quality 100% 
combed-cotton yams for the knitting 
and weaving industries. 

We are using the latest technology to 
keep our plants modem. Our new yam, 
called StoweSpun™ is a result of the 
rapid technical advances that are being 
made in the industry continually. 

Take it from us: Think about textiles. 
As a Davidson graduate, you already 
have a reputation in the business. 




StoweSpun 



ELJLSaswsMills 




The Chronicle Mills 
National V^m Mills, Inc. 
StoMe Spinning Company 



100 N. Main St 
Belmont. NC 28012 
704 825-5314 



ADVERTISEMENTS 345 




ballet arts workshop 




Specializing in Classical Ballet 



Also Offering; 

Pointe Eurythmics 

Tap Jazz 

Dancers' Stretches & Aerobics 

108 S, Main Street. Davidson, N.C. 892 5709 



1(1(11 l_ho>io( In 

(,.isi,ini.i \t :so5: 

\/\/ I 1)1)11 ADHAM 43. lit. :»() 
.1M: \assjii rjr 
AuguMj. GA lOTOP 



BABCO(.K, BROOKS ROBl RT (_'_'. Ji6. 232 

\mlb Mcjdon l.n 

I OJ».o,id, KS hhldb 
B\BCO(_k lALRA LEIGH J7-'. :»3 

l(li:fi Mcjdow l.n 

I cjmood. kS 66:06 
BAIL >Y. ATMIRE JR Jft. //< 212 

17". Moodv Si Apl A 

l.owtll. MA Om54 
BAILhV. JAMI.S STEPP .'7.'. JO 

24 PLnulion Dr 

S.mpMinvilli:. SC :96K I 
BAKER. BRENDA JEAN lAI. -M" 

Old (.rccnuich. CT 0(iH70 
BAKER, DOLKjI.AS brent J6. Il>. 231 

4.10(1 Sum(Ticrvillo Rd 

Phtnn t i(\, Al. -16»h7 
BAKER. THOMPSON S 

1K11 Bc((cs Circle 

J,icks»n>illc. EL .12210 
B\l(.OM, MDA RIVES 226. 229. 233 

2(i«0 Endor Rd 

Pcn-jtolj, EL 3:-'i0.1 
BALDWIN. ALBERT LESLIE 239 4f 

11 hi Boxwood Dr 

\(l,in(j, GA .10.14.S 
BALDWIN. KARI N RLTH X. 137. 224. 74. 

1007 S Fj.r»jv Dr 

Burl,ng(on. NC 27215 
BALLANTVNE. LISA M 112. 113. 144, 14."^. 

2 74. 44 

2 Ticl Wjv 

HuuMon. tx 77019 
BALLARD. BARBARA R I.Sfi. 187 
BANKHEAD. WILLIAM MARTIN 4.1, (.'/, 

2.<9. 2>6 

\9M Hawlhornc Rd 

Wilming(on, NC 2840.1 
BANKS. DAVID C 66. 289, J.'J 

2H0I Rothgcb Dr 

R.ilcigh, NC 27f.09 
BARBER. DAVID ROBERT >2. 239 

640 Second Si 

Oulfporl. MS .19.S0I 
BARBER. MARY AMANDA 223. 232 

1910 NW 21 Tcrrjcc 

Gjincsvillc. El. .12605 
BARBER. RICHARD PAL 1. JR 

805 EicldNlonc Rd 

Morrcsvdlc, NC 281 15 
BARBER, RLPERT T JR 1.15, 191, 
BARBER, WILLIAM H JR .56, 239. 7.^ 

415 Londonbcrr> Rd NW 

AlLinlj, GA 30127 
BARGMANN. WILLIAM J III 252 

no Sjlisburi Dr 

Summcrvillc. SC 2948.1 
BARKER. DAN TAYLOR JR 30. 32. 33. 2.^2 

2912 Skvc Dr 

Eavcllcvillc, NC 28103 
BARKIEY. DAVID ROBERT .5.', 144, 274 

3.109 Robinhood Rd 

T..lljhas.scc, EL 32312 
BARNES, DAVID WEBSTER .54, //(. 232. 
233 

9605 River Rd 
Richmond. VA 23229 
BARNES. ROBERT LAMAR JR 102. 103. 

4520 NW 19lh Ave 

Gainesville, EL 32605 
BARNES, ROBIN B 70, 196 
BARNETT, CAROLYN BUELL lOS. 109. 274. 

-'7.5, J 7 

2S75 Meadow Ln 

Henderson, NC 27536 
BARNETT, HAIL FARMER /:■-', 4.5 

2875 Mcadov. Ln 

Henderson, NC 27536 
BARNHARDT, VIRGINIA J 224 

P O Bo< 665 

Mount Airv, NC 27030 
BARRAT. JAMES RODMAN 6.5, 239. 285 

R R 1 Box 417 

Shepherds Town, WV 25443 
BARRETT, MARK ROBERTSON 65, J.5.' 

Rl I Box 15 

Andrews, NC 28901 
BARRINGER. MARY WOMBLE 6.5, 67, 224. 
74, 232 

Rl 2 Box 402 

Sanford, NC 273.10 
BARRON, CYNTHIA LOUISE 274. 40 

6X9 Sedgewood Dr 

Rock Hill, SC 29730 
BASEBALL TEAM 102 
BASKETBALL TEAM 



Mens 
Worn. 



104 



106 



BASKIN. JAMES HLNT 43. 134. 135, 137. 

144, .'74, -'7.5, 36. 96 

2283 Sagamore Hills Dr 

Decalur. GA 30033 
BASKIN, STl ART GOODRK H >2. 77, K3. 

120. 121 276. -'77 w 

260 Counlrv Ln 

SanAnlonio. TX 78209 
BATES, LOUIS THOMAS IJ, .5«, 2f2 

2893 Ca-sllcwood Dr 

Allanla, GA 30327 
BATES, PATRICIA lOS. -'.5.', 37 

5 Glenridgc 

Lillle Rock. AR 72207 
BAUSCHI.ICHIR. JE1ERE> W ll.\ 229 

Rl 2 Box 33 

Umalilla, EL 32784 
BAYNARD. PAUL 90. 91. 239. J.5 

6 19 Kimberl> Dr 
Greensboro, NC 27408 

BA/OS, JOHN ;/5 

BEAN, CECIL WESLEY -'.5-'. 5o 

519 26lh Si NW 

Hickors, NC 28601 
BEARD, PETl R LYNDON S3. -'.5.' 

9204 Woodvale Dr 

Damascus, MD 20750 
BEATY, MARY DAVIS 192 
BEAVER, SCOTT KYLE J.1.5 

1641 Marvcllc Ave 

Rocky Mourn, NC 27801 
BECK, CURTIS VANCE .'.5.' 

1910 Shirley Dr 

Burlinglon, NC 27215 
BECK. TODD ALAN 26. 122. 232 

1001 Parry Ave 

Palmyra. NJ 08065 
BECK. WARREN EINDLAY 124. 



144. 



Dr 



2509 Lakei 
Knoxville. TN 37920 
BEDINGER. LUCY FINCH -'77. 149 
PO Box 310 
Boydlon. VA 23917 
SEEKER. EDWARD CARR II .'6. .54. .'.5.'. .50 
604 Colgate Si 
Durham. NC 27704 
BEEN. BETH ANN 239 

Pickens. WV 26230 
BEESLEY. SUSAN LORINE .'76. :;77 
2507 Hemingway Dr 
Nashville. TN 37215 
BELK. JOHN (.5.5 
BELL. KATHERINE FRAZER .'.5.1 
1311 Williamson Dr 
Raleigh. NC 27608 
BENEDICT. JOHN EDWARD 39. 67. 90. / 70. 
.'.16. 232 

10840 Springknoll 
Potomac. MD 20854 
BENNER. EILEEN DORIS 226. 232 
1812 Maplewood Dr 
Johnson Cily. TN 37601 
BENNETT. WILLIAM BYRON 127. .'.5.? 
829 West Wesley Rd. 
Allanla. GA 30327 
BERNARD. RICHARD R 197 
BERSON, WILI lAM \ II .56. 57. /.'/ 
8 (ilendale Rd 
Summit. NJ 07901 
BESSELLIEL. THOMAS 1. 70. IS6 
BETHEA. TIMOTHY JOHN 26. 147 
3221 Debbie Dr 
Hcndcrsonvillc. NC 28739 
BIDDLE. LINDSAY LOUISE 4.?. 70. 152. 190. 
239 

807 Jones Si 
Old Hickory. TN 17138 
BIEDENBACH. EDWARD J /04, /0.5 
BIGCiERS. JAMES NEAL JR 239. 7.5 
Box 988 

Welch. WV 24801 
BIGGS. THOMAS HOWARD 
I 1710 Magruder Ln 
Rockville. MD 20852 
BINGHAM. EUGENE IK2 
BINKLEY. CRAIG LEE 46. (/.5. .'.5J 
Rl 4 Box I55L 
Newion. NC 28658 
BIOLOGY SOCIETY 94 
BISHOP. DIGGS SCOTT .'51 
RED I 

Earlysville, VA 22936 
BLACK STUDENT COALITION 86 
BLACK. JANET WARD 138. .104. .I0.<i 
210 N Cannon Blvd 
Kannapohs. NC 28081 
BLACKMAN. JOHN MARVIN //.5. .'.19. 45 
300 Warsaw Rd 
Clinton. NC 28328 
BLACKWEIL. NANCY 181. 195 
Bl AKE. BETSY ANNE -'-'.1 
Rl 10 Box 401 
Winston Salem. NC 27107 
BLAKE. MICHAEL C 54. -'.14. 232 
712 Wcslborough Rd 
Knoxville. TN 37919 
BLAIOCKF ROBERT 76. 77 



ij«p(w«tv AdvrflikMnmt 




D. k. Lafar, Jr, 'll 
Dan S. LoFar, '31 
D K. LaFar III, '51 
Dun S LaFar, Jr , 'j7 
W. Marshall LuFar, 'i\ 



C/r/.j/o/z/r/, 



\J 



LAFAR INDUSTRIES, 
INC. 

Spinners of 
QUALITY YARNS 



O J^uun f\auo/t 



O i^oinhecl and i^arclecl 
L^oUon {jam 6 



ADVERTISEMENTS 347 



BLAND. DEBORAH IRENE 54. 144. 277 

404 Harrill Circle 

Spring Lake. NC 28390 
BLEDSOE. SUSAN KAY 253 

I Beach Dr 2406 

Si Petersburg. FL 33701 
BLISS. FRANK W JR 197. 24 
BLOOD. DANIEL WILLIAM 46. 122. I5H. 227 

2054 Bayou Dr 

Orchard Lake. Ml 48033 
BLOUNT. MARGARET ANN /.';. 224. 232 

720 Farnham Dr 

Richmond. VA 23235 
BOARDMAN. LISA ALLYN 224. 232 

701 Balmoral Rd, 

Winter Park. FL 32789 
BOARDMAN. LORI ANN 253 

701 Balmoral Rd 

Winter Park. FL 32789 
BOHNSLAV. TIMOTHY PAUL 54. ii. 277 

12136 Stirrup Rd 

Reston. VA 22091 
BOLDING. WILLIAM H 182. 183. 276. 327 
BOLEN. CAROLYN HILL 239. 240 

Rt 5 Box 204 

Gala«. VA 24333 
BOLTON. DANA JAMES 46 

136 Lakeside Dr 

Oakdalc. NY 11769 
BONDURANT. NANCY VANCE 106, 107. 

222 232 

bli Greenwood Rd 

Chapel Hill. NC 27.M4 
BOON. LINDA G 

976 Viking Dr 

Stone Mountain. GA 30083 
BOONE. DAVID WARNER 39. 240 

4918 Rembert Dr 

Raleigh. NC 27612 
BOOTH. GEORGE EDWARD 

3400 Chevington Rd 

Charlotte. NC 28211 
BOOTH. MARY BROOKS 5 276. 277 

416 Monticello Ave 

Durham. NC 27707 
BOST. CATHEY COWLES 5. .'40 

851 SylvanRd. 

Winston Salem. NC 27104 
BOSWELL. JOHN G 27S 

601 Webster Dr 

Decatur. GA 30033 
BOUDREAU. CAROLINE F 68. 222. 232 

3607 Bufrington Place 

Greensboro. NC 27410 
BOULWARE. JARMAL WYNDALE 240 

1741 Campbcllton Rd SW 

Atlanta. GA 30311 
BOUNDS. GREGORY MILLARD 115. 227. 

232 

Rl 2 Box 52 

Mt, Olive. NC 28-365 
BOURNE. RICHMOND W III 52. 240 

4412 Stagecoach Rd 

Kingsporl. TN 37664 
BOWDEN. ROBERT H III 

3712 Manton Dr 

Lynchburg. VA 24503 
BOWIE. ROBERT THORNTON 

2812 Barnard E Bee St. 

Anderson. SC 29621 
BOYCE. BARBARA MOORE 223. 228. 253. 37 

7802 Topa? Rd 

Richmond. VA 23228 
BOYD. KAY WILHELMINA 87, 232 

519 W Council St 

Salisbury. NC 28144 
BOYER. LISA 106 
BOYER. TIMOTHY STERLING 6*. 232 

210 Raleigh Ave 

Hampton. VA 23661 
BOYKIN. CLAUDIA LOUISE 

410 ", N French 

Uncaster. SC 29720 
BOYLSTON. KATHERINE EVE 278, 279. .17 
1892 Surrey Trail 

Conyers. GA 30208 
BRADBERRY. JOHN GROGAN 175. 45 

932 Terrace Acres 

Auburn. AL 36830 
BRADHAM. JOHN MCLEOD 127. 232 

46 Murray Blvd 

Charleston. SC 29401 
BRADY. ALAN EDWARD 

5502 SW 1st Ct 
Plantation. FL 33317 
BRANCH. JOSEPH RON 196 
BRANNEN. ROBERT B JR 34. 11^. 240 
Rt 5 Country Club Rd 

Statcsboro. GA 30458 
BRASS ENSEMBLE 76 
BRASS QUINTET 76 
BRAUER. ALBERT G 199 
BRAWLEY. LISA CAMILLE 
6211 Sardis Rd, 
Charlotte. NC 28211 
BRAY. KATHERINE MAUZE 160. 226. 229. 
232 

6409 Winston Dr 
Bethesda. MD 20034 
BRAZELL. ELIZABETH DAWN 43. 77. 119. 



240. 25 

455 Heards Ferry Rd 

Atlanta. GA 30328 
BREIDENSTINE. JOHN DAVID 68. 132, 133. 

227. 232 

1313 Hunsickcr Rd 

Lancaster. PA 17601 
BRENNAN. ANNE GRANVILLE 

21 14 S Live Oak Pkwy. 

Wilmington. NC 28401 
BRICE. ELIZABETH RIVES 222. 232 

203 Augusta St 

Easley. SC 29640 
BRIDWELL. SHARON LEE 253 

4243 Nelby Dr 

Stone Mountain.GA 30083 
BRIGHT. ELIZABETH H 27S 

1 18 N Hermitage Ave 

Lookout Mountain. TN 37350 
BRIGHT. FRANK SOYARS 124. ^40. 285 

118 N Hermitage Ave. 

Lookout Mountain. TN 37350 
BRITT. MARGURETE ROSE 278. 279. 37 

1805 N Elm St 

Lumbcrton. NC 28358 
BROADWELL. FREDERICK F 65. 240. 96 

618 Palmetto St 

Spartanburg. SC 29302 
BROCKWAY. JOHN P 94. 199 
BROOKS. CHERYL 224 232 

235 Sandpile Rd 

Indialanlic. FL 32903 
BROST. BRIAN CHARLES 130. 131. 75. 84 

4012 Piedmont Dr 

Huntsville. AL 35802 
BROTHERTON. TIMOTHY H -■;6. 132. 133, 

240. 96 

Rt 7 Box 900 

Mooresville. NC 28115 
BROWN. ANDREW MELTON 58. 59. 253 

2448 Evergreen 

Royal Oak. Ml 48073 
BROWN. COLIN LEE 39, 278. 279 

333 S Candler St 

Decatur. GA 30030 
BROWN. ELIZABETH SCOTT 49. 278 

2209 S Liveoak Pkwy 

Wilmington. NC 28403 
BROWN. JAMES DEBLOIS 49 

PO Box 387 

Laurens. SC 29360 
BROWN. JAMES FRANKLIN JR 42. 43, .54. 

83. 240 

1805 Fisher Trail 

Atlanta. GA 30345 
BROWN. JAMES MILTON JR 240. 40 

581 I Donegal Dr 

Charlotte. NC 28212 
BROWN. JAMIE LYNN 95. 253. 74. 40 

221 Piercy Rd 

Morganton. NC 28655 
BROWN. LINDA SUE 49. 240 

101 I Riverside Blvd 

Lumbcrlon. NC 28358 
BROWN. MARY KATHRYN 39. 223, 228. 

253 

333 S Candler St 

Decatur. GA 30030 
BROWN. PETER 49 
BROWN. RACHEL LYNN 223, 232 

1011 Riverside Blvd 

Lumbcrton. NC 28358 
BROWN. ROBERT STEWART 49. 88 

1449 Grove Rd 

Pittsburgh, PA 15236 
BROWN. SUEJETTE LANIER 253. 36. 37 

303 Meadowbrook Terrace 

Greensboro. NC 27408 
BROWNE. HERBERT H III 43, 83, III, 253. 
147 

201 I Pinewood Circle 

Charlotte. NC 28211 

BROYHILI . B CLAIRE 

135 Claron Place SE 

Lenoir. NC 28645 
BROYLES. ANTHONY WILSON ^J4. 232 

3831 Chancellor Ct 

Montgomery. AL 361 I I 
BRUBAKER. R L 199 

BRUCE. ESTHER LOUISE 137. 280. 281. 84 
128 S Fulton St 

Salisbury. NC 28144 

BRUCE. ROBERT W 232 

101 Country Club Dr, 

Greenville. SC 29602 
BRUCK. STEPHANIE JANE 226, 232 

210 Red Hill Rd 
Orange. VA 22960 

BRUNS. DAVID ANDREW J4. 240 

109 Lyic Cirlcc 

York. PA 17403 
BRYAN. HORACE ALDEN 199. 255 
BRYAN. LESLIE JANE 72. 113. 226. 228. 232 

211 Lake Otis Rd 
Winter Haven. FL 33880 

BRYANT. BETH MARIE 131. 223 

2812 W I9ih Si 

Wilmington. DE 19806 
BRYANT. SHARON LYNN 163. 223. 232 

144 Otari Dr 



Kingsporl. TN 37660 
BUCHANAN. JAMES ROBERT 240 40 

Rt. 12 Box 130 

Sanford. NC 27330 
BUCHANAN, SUSAN KAY 240. 89. 37 

1 1313 Coachman's Way 

Raleigh. NC 27614 
BUCKLEY. ELIZABETH ANN 

3621 Wcslover Rd 

Durham. NC 27707 
BUCKLEY. LISA ANN 49. 253 

94 Tulip St 

Summit. NJ 07901 
BUCKNER. KARRIE EVANS 38. 39. 240 

PO Box 15 

Trvon. NC 28782 
BULLARD. ANDREW GRAY 138. 281 

301 Pecan Ln 

Laurinburg. NC 28352 
BULLOCK. JAMES BLAKENEY .'40 

8895 Forsl Meadow Dr, 

Germantown. TN 38138 
BURGESS. PAT 195 
BURKE. TIMOTHY TRUMAN 115 

123 Lake Rena Dr 

Longwood. FL 327.50 
BURKS. ROBERT TUCKER 253 

705 Windsor Ave, 

Anderson. SC 29621 
BURNARD. GREGORY G 

3466 Ounston Rd 

Alexandria. VA 22302 
BURNETT. JOHN N 144. 178. 179. 198. 195 
BURNS. JEFFERY DAVID 281 

119 Captains Walk 

Milford. CT 06460 
BURR. PETER ANDERSON ;.'.'. 228. 232 

50 Northlcdge 

Amherst. NY 14226 
BURRIS. MARK WAYNE 54. 240. 50. 96 

PO Box 1206 

Albemarle. NC 28001 
BURTON. CHARLES 184 
BURTS. RICHARD C JR 181. 189 
BUSH. LAURA .'40. .W 

805 Kamel Circle 

Augusta. GA 30909 
BUSINESS OFFICE 194 
BUTLER. BRIAN CRAIG 

3520 Teton Circle 

Birmingham. AL 35216 
BUTLER. FREDERICK C III /7.'!. 237 

2312 BIythc Rd 

Wilmington. NC 28403 
BUTLER, JOHN MARVIN 28. 44. 45 

1208 N Walnut St 

Lumbcrton. NC 28358 
BYNUM. WILLIAM B JR 115. 236 

153 Pinehursl Dr 

Rocky Mount. NC 27801 
BYRD. SHARON H 192 



CAIN. JOHN MALONEY 45 

2440 Banchory Rd 

Winter Park. FL 32792 
CAIN. LAURENCE S 199 
CALDWELL. DONALD H JR 280. 281. 75 

Rl 2 Star Point Rd 

Jamestown. TN 38556 
CALDWELL. NADINE C, 192 
CALTON. WILLIAM C JR .'.'7. 313 

2912 Monarch Dr 

Charlotte. NC 28208 
CALVIN. JOSEPH HIRAM III 82 

4141 Woodlawn Dr 

Nashville. TN 37205 
CAMPANELLA. JOEL ENE 253 

58 W Shore Dr 

Pennington. NJ 08534 
CAMPANY. ROBERT FOR .<J. 83. 144. 145. 

281. 75 

123 W Main St. 

Abingdon. VA 24210 
CAMPBELL. ARTHUR MALCOLM 10. 68. 

183. 234. 232 

6301 Canlrell 

Little Rock. AR 72207 
CAMPBELL. CARY DODD 253, 37 

2552 Habersham Rd, 

Atlanta. GA .W.105 
CAMPBELL. LAURIE ELLEN 77. 134. 137. 

145. 148 

Rd 2 

Salem, NY 12865 
CAMPBELL, SARAH PAYNE 62, 6.5. .'.5.1. 50 

Rt I Box 360 

Doswell. VA 23047 
CAMPBELL. SCOTT OLIVER 240 

8218 Ovcrbury Rd 

Richmond. VA 23227 
CANTWELL. KATHY SUSAN 48. 49. 240 

P O Box 67 

Clermont. FL 3271 I 
CAPE. BARBARA LEE 39. 280. 281. 307 

4262 Tuckahoe Rd 

Memphis. TN 38117 
CAPELIA. FRANK MARK 46. 280, 281 



SO Dalewood Rd 
West Caldwell, NJ 07006 
CARLTON, HULDAH DEBORAH 58, 282, 37 
2608 Atlantic Ave 
Savannah. GA 31405 
CARNEGIE. PROSSER S 192, 193 
CARPENTER. DAVID COWLES 21, 49, 56, 
740 

2 Untcrn Circle 
Newport News. VA 23606 
CARPENTER. JOHN MARK 52 
Casilla 4829 
Quito. Ecuador -0540 
CARPENTER. MARY E 240, 37 
Casilla 4829 
Quito. Ecuador -0540 
CARR. DAVID RUDDLE 764. ^40. 45 
507 Coharie Dr 
Clinton. NC 28328 
CARROLL. FELIX A 198 
CARROLL. JOHN F 105 
7109 Panorama Dr 
Rockv.llc. MD 20855 
CARTEE. THOMAS E JR 253 
461 S Peace Haven Rd, 
Winston Salem. NC 27103 
CARTER. CLARK EDWARD 131. 223, 232 
2109 Hcatherly Rd 
Kingsport. TN 37660 
CARTER. DONALD STEVEN 6.'. 236, 253, 45 
81 I Sherwood Rd 
Gainesville. GA 30501 
CARTER. LOCKE YANCEY JR 253,ii 
2109 Healherly Rd 
Kingsport. TN 37660 
CARTER. WILLIAM D JR 56. .'4; 
Box 1031 1 

Southporl. NC 28461 
CARTMILL. THOMAS A 117 
CASE. VERNA MILLER 198 
CASSELL. TIMOTHY ARNOLD 
200 Stonehedge Dr 
Greenville. SC 29615 
CATES. CHARLES CURTISS 39 
Fremont St 
Faison. NC 28341 
CAULEY. LANIER STEWART .'J7 
501 Lynchburg Ct 
Mobile. AL 36608 
CENTER FOR SPECIAL STUDIES 24 
CHAMBER CHOIR 74 
CHAMBERMAIDS 180 
CHAMPI AIN. LAURA MICHELE 49. .'4/ 
4901 Lansing St, NE 
St Petersburg. FL 33703 
CHATER. WILLIAM A 46. 115, 253 
PO Box 4168 
Charlotte. NC 28209 
CHAVEZ. CINDY ANN 31, 39 
P O Box 452 
Pitlsboro. NC 27312 
CHEEK. JAMES WHITNEY 49, .56, 62, 228, 
253, 233 
I 7 Melrose Ave, 
Asheville. NC 28804 
CHEEK, JULIANNA 7, 58, 224. 232 
317 Englcman Ave. 
Burlington, NC 27215 
CHEERLEADING SQUAD 108 
CHENEY. JULIEANNE C 253 
I 16 Plantation Dr. 
Thomasville. GA 31792 
CHIDSEY. JOHN W III 5.'. 241. 96 
1378 Harbor Dr 
Sarasota. FL 33579 
CHILDERS. SHIRLEY 192 
CHOUDURY. PARTHO 247. 264. .'67 
21. Golf Linkds 
New Delhi I 10003 
India 
CHRISTENSEN. JAMES ERIC 253 
PO Box 1719 
Davidson. NC 28036 
CHRISTIAN. CLAIBORNE A /64. 253. 45 
62 James Landing Rd, 
Newport News. VA 23606 
CHRISTIAN. EDITH F 190 
CHRISTIE. KATHERINE 145. 282, 40 
472 Tivoh Dr 
Switzerland, FL 32043 
CHRISTMAS 162 
CHUNG, JOHN JAY 183, 253, 40 
8618 Ewing Dr 
Bethesda. MD 20034 
CHURCHILL. ELLEN WORTH 241 
807 Wcdgefield Rd 
Florence. SC 29501 
CLARK. CYNTHIA ANNE .'4/. 88. 40 
2822 Foster Ridge Dr 
Atlanta. GA 30345 
CLARK. FRANK ANDREW .54. 108, 248, 254 
Rt 5 Box 333 
Oxford. NC 27565 
CLARK. MARTIN F JR 144. 145 
Box 407 

Stuart. VA 24171 
CLARK. THOMAS F 201 
CLARK. THOMAS W 52, 254 
1091 Ostrandcr Rd 
East Aurora. NY 14052 




Deli-Lounge 



11:00am to 1:00am daily 
Northwood Village Shopping Center 
Mooresville. N.C. 663-5209 



■Open for lunch, dinner, and late night meals. 
■Special rates on your favorite beverages 
5:00pm to 7:00pm. 10% off package wine 
with Davidson ID. 

■Kegs, cheeses, and all your party needs. 
■Pinball, T.V., Backgammon, Etc. 



DAVIS. ROS Al D Rl UO M. <*. i:i. 

147 

705 Gimghoul Rd 
Chapel Hill. N( :7<,u 
DAVIS. SANDRA I I Kill W. 2W. .'*■ 

SO 

1878 Trumbull Dr 

Dunwoody. GA 30.13S 
DEAN. WALTER WILSON J4I 

33 Brurwood Rd 

Ashcvillc. NC 2IIS04 
DEANS' OFFICE I7K 
DEBATE TEAM k: 
DlCk. STI WART 1 INTON -'" 

2-502 Millwood Place 

Charloncsvillc. VA ;:i(ll 
OELFORGf . CLARl NCI J Ml 41,. I 

:ii7 

PO Box 211 

Cullo»hcc. NC 2»7:3 
DEMPSFV BLRT J Ml ■*, 10. 4:. 4.1 

19 WcMlyn Dr 

Rome. (iA 30161 
DENNIS. BROWN W JR lOS. :4I 

76 Palisades Rd 

Allanla. GA 30309 
DENT. JOHN M III :<4. J.s 

206 W 26th Si 

Tiflon.GA 31794 
DEWEY. ALICIA MARION .VJ. -Mi 

11025 N Counlrv Snuirc 

Houslon. TX 77(r24 
DIBFNEDI TTO. RICHARD T l«\ ' 

3»4 Greenwich Si 

Bcrgenreld, NJ 07621 
DICK. THIODORI STf VI N J.ll 

1129 Mercer Dr 

Tallahassee. FL 32312 
DICKEY. SUZANNE SARAH JJ?. .' 

Box 764 Bayou Liber 

Shdcll. LA 7045» 
DILLARD. GEORGE JtK^R['l s6 

315 Carolina Circle 

Graham. NC 27253 
DILLON. JAMES MICHAEL 46. / ; s" 

1906 Coventry Circle 

Hunlsvillc. AL 35«01 
DISHMAN. BENJAMIN i JR /_M, 

904 Riverwood (. I 

Franklin. TN 37064 
DOCKERY. AMELIA :Kh. 187 
DOCKERY. CHARLES I) JOO 
DODD. SALLY PFNDLI TON :.U 

4715 Rolfe Rd 

Richmond, VA :i;26 



1X)\1IM( K kK II Skill SSI .'sJ 

11 H.inil.i Dr 

Birniingh.ini SI ls;iw 
DON A HOW I k l)S\ll)WIIIS s_'. si. J4I 

Tinker Hill kd 



Ph,. 



I'S 



IXJNAI I) SI I \SNI)I K (, Jk .'.V 

4(S4 Chicr.! Si 

( i.lumbi.i S( ;i:il6 
IX)N1 I Y Willi SV1 I' Jk ; 14. 135, 

/6s. JK1. :u 

302 I oils W.is 
louissille K'l 4ii:ir 

DONOVAN Wll I IAV1 H AkI IS '" 

6612 Hunlcrs I .inc 

Durham. N( 27713 
DORM LIFE 164 
DORSLTT. STL ART B sx sv, 144. .7' 

2 '^01 Wake Dr 

Raleigh. NC 2760X 
DOLCl AS, CIIARI IS THOMAS 14. 

2K14 Billint! Rd 
WinsL.n Salem. NC 27 1114 
DOL C.I \SS I I I/A KNOX .7sj, 36 



Kcr. 



Dr 



Raleigh, NC 27606 
DOWNING, DIANI I 1 AIM Jsj 

7907 Greeles Blvd 

Springneld. VA 22152 
DRAINF. I ISA MARIL _'J/. 17 

315 Walerce Ave 

( olumbia, SC 29205 
DRAMA 

Major Productions 134 

Winter Workshops 136 
DRISKM 1 Al l( I DW ARD IJ, J Ml. 11 

/ 7.1. 240. .' s J 

1307 Liggalcs Rd 

I snchburp, \ A 24^02 
Dl BOSI RIC HARD TA'i I OR _7)_7 :'• 

419 Scotland Ave 

Rockingham NC 2K379 
DL KF BR> AN W «. M4. 50 

1601 Middle River Dr 

H Lauderdale. II 33.305 
DLMAS. C AHTI RINI S ^v. ^41. ,1^ 

3«19 Hillgrand 

Durham, NC 2770^ 
DLNBAR Wll I lAM I IV S_7 117. _',V? 

10215 Alliston Dr NW 
Pickcnngton. OH 43147 
DLRSO, MICHAI 1 PHILIP 49 
1 I Westward 1 ane 
Pclhjm Manor N > lllxlll 



1)1 RW AS I INDSI S BOI IN : If. 



LARNHARDT DAVID I 1 (,l Nl <t, 

211^ South M.un 

New I ondon, NC 211127 
I \STI kl INC, H SkkS R Jk 74/ 



, SC 



Bcnnci 
I SSTI kl ING, I I Nil H 49 74/ 

102 Brantlev Mall 1 n 

I ondw.Kid, I I t:7S|i 
FBI IN, SC OTT STI W ART 74, 90. 9/. 74 

124 Midiale Dr 

Hunnngl.in, WS :S7||^ 
I BORN Bl TTS I I I 74/, 41) 

7215 Woodward Ave 

IX-land, I I 3:^211 
FDMONDSON I 1 inoN I 7«/ 
I DMONDSON PATRIt IA B 7H.1 
FDLCATIONAI POIIC \ COMMinFh 
I IIW SkDS JOHN S 49 -7 94 IM /7 

6112 k.Kklord kd 

lirtcnsboro, NC 27401s 
Kil IN JOHN ARTIU R 1^1, .'17. 7.S. _7 

KS^ N Island Dr NW 

Atlanta GA 10327 
ICI IN. MARY SISAN 19 6.7 7.W. 74 

X^^ N Island Dr 

Atlanla GA 3032"' 
1 HkMSN, J SMI S I kl Dl RIC K ,S6, .717 

721 l.recnridpc I n 



KS 



I IC HIT Bl k(,l k Jl I I S I 

4>i kidgCw,H>d P1.1CC 



Sshi 



■sC 2X 



1 ISI NHISI 1)1 BRA 1 I I 7s4 7/.S 

12112 Romillv Rd 

Wilmington, Dl I9HIII 
FLECTION 19(10 I6X 
IT FY, JOHN WISl I > JR 7/, .V7. .•'4; 

Rt 3 Bos «« 

Ahoskie. NC 27910 
I I 1 I OTT ANNI Rl Bl CC A X7. .V4. .' I.I 

310 Pilot St 



Durl 



^7flT 



I I I lOTT J SMI S 1 SWkl N( I 7s4. 4S 

210* While O.ik 

Valdosla, GA UMll 
I I I IS, Kl ITH DW AS Nl <7 / / 5. .VX. .711 

PO Bos 21* 

WcHKlbine, (iA 11569 
El I IS MARII LIPSCOMB 7W 74 

2936 Arden Rd NW 

Atlanta, GA 1IHI1* 

I I I IS kl I D M :«x. :«•/ 



I I MORI Sll PHI N M SkK '(/, 



II WOOD C HRISTOPHI R I II 49. 14 

.'XX. 7X9 

2234 Donato Dr 

Belleair Beach. 1 I 31*3* 
II Yl A. C IIARI IS 1 *6. 779. 711 

Rt 2 B,n *6 



W J 



FMANON 40 

EMFRC.FNCN MFDK SI 1 K UNI I IONS I 

I Ml RSON kONSMII'SlI s_'.'Sj 

4209 Abbott Rd 

Orchard P.irk NS 1412" 
I NGH ( II Ski 1 S S Ik /64. 4s- 

*I2 Camcrburs I n 

Alcsandiij \ S 22114 
I NNISS STI PHI N ( kOSl I S 

PO Bos 1-4" 

Dasidson NC 21S016 
I PI S HANSIOkDM JR /<«.;.*/. .'»l. 9 
I k\ IN M Skt. SRI Bill .V 9/. 160. .'.'6, 

104 WoiKlside Place 

Morganton, NC 2S6** 
I RVIN kOBI RT C RAW I ORD 79. x.'. 90. 

144. 7S4. X4 

104 Woodside Place 

Morg.inlon. NC 2116** 
ISPOSITO. KEVIN DWA^NI 77' 

2424 NW 18 Place 

Gainesville. I I 3260* 
ISTOC K ROBl RT G 1 12 / " 
FTC 50 
ITRl . J SMI s MIC II SI I s,, .',v,v 

762 Main SI 

Shrewsburs, M S 111*4* 
ITTFIX.I I DANIl I *ft, 7*4, 411. X4 

4.109 Harlfield 

Wesllake. C A 91361 
I I BSNKS. ROBIN SAk S 14- 




Famous Since 1977 
Restaurant And Convenience Store 
"Added Attraction!— The Conery" 



3 Miles North of Davidson College 
On Route To Lake Campus 

Hwy115S Mt. Mourne,N.C. 
Ph 892-0263 




B«pks 
^ifts 
Furniture 



I S J^ain Stre.-i 8924416 



^^^W ^FABRICS I 



^ 



^^o^^--^^ 






Paul M. Neisler, Class of 1944 
Charles E. Neisler, III, Class of 1947 
Charles A. Neisler, Class of 1949 
Henry P. Neisler, Class of 1949 
C. Elizabeth Neisler, Class of 1979 
H. Parks Neisler, Class of 1979 
David C. Neisler, Class of 1981 
W. Hayne Neisler, Class of 1981 



Shelby. 
North Carolina 



ADVERTISEMENTS 351 



732 Fern Si 

MariclU. CA 30067 
EUMENEAN SOCIETY 82 
EVANS. ALEXANDER WIER 159. 160. 240. 

291. 297 

P.O. Boi 668 

Chatham. VA 24531 
EVANS. DAVID 23. 159. 160. 2f4. 297. 4J. 4.< 

PC Box 668 

Chalham. VA 24531 
EVANS. GINGER 181 
EVANS. JAMES ELEY 52. 254 

140<) Cherr) Ln 

Virginia Beach. VA 23454 
EVANS. MARGARET T 141. 241. 297 

PC Boi 668 

Chalham. VA 24531 
EVANS. ROBERT DEATON 49. 56. 57. 145. 

150. 1 51 

2590 Tanglc*ood Rd 

Decalur. GA 30033 
EVANS. VIRGINIA BORDEN 247. 291 



Box 688 

Uurinburg. NC 28352 
EXPERIENTIAL PROGRAM 28 



FACl'LTV 196-221 

FAHEY. MARK EDWARD J*. 115. 291 

1106 Claire Ave 

Slcubcnville. OH 43952 
FAIRES. ERIC STEVEN 241 

PO Box 210 

Hunsullc. TN 37756 
FANNIE AND MABLE 48 
FANT. MARY PACOLETTE 82. 161. 226. 23> 

Rl 1 Summerr.eld Farm 

Independence. VA 24348 
FARRAR. MARTHA CARVER 241 

729 Creekside Dr 

Ml Pleasanl. SC 29464 
FARRELL. EDWARD C 114 
FAULKENBERRV. CINDY LOU 71. 254. 256 



HAM & EGGS 




After the 900 Room closes Friday 
and Saturday nights at 1:00 am, 
join your friends at HAM & EGGS 
for an "early morning" breakfast. 

Hwy. 77. Cornelius Exit. 
Open 24 Hrs 



18425 Kingshill Rd 
Germanlown. MD 20767 
FAULKNER. JAMES CURTIS 161. 241. 45 
417 High Si 

Pans. KY 40361 
FERARD. DOMINIC G C 26S 
Sunningdale House 

Rab> Road 
Slockion-on-Tees 
Cleveland. England 
FERGUSON. DENISE ANN 242. 37 

2904 Garlh Rd SE 

Hunlsville. AL 35801 
FERGUSON. JOHN BRIAN 227. 233 

P O Box 5003 

Anderson. SC 29623 
FERRARI. VICTOR STEVEN 34. 242 

3121 Sharon Rd 

Charlolle. NC 28211 
FICHTNER. ERIC GORDON 52. 134. 135. 

137. 242 

3290 Se*cll Mill Rd 

Mariella. GA 30062 
FIELD HOCKEY TEAM 112 
FIELD. ELLEN WARE 224. 233 

PO Box 1449 

Pinehursl. NC 28374 
FIELDS. ALAN BEAUMONT 54. 242 

PO Box 2067 

Scbring. FL 33870 
FIELDS. LOIS WILLIARD 247. 291. 308 

2011 Facully Dr 

Winslon Salem. NC 27106 
FIELDS. MARCUS STEPHENS 34. 235. 254. 

232 

733 Calawba 

Raleigh. NC 27609 
FIELDS. ROBERT E 111 291. 308 

733 Calawba 

Raleigh. NC 27609 
FINCH. ROBERT MAXWELL 56. 234. 233 

274 S Elm Si 
Commerce. GA 30529 
FINDLAY. ELIZABETH W 65. 224. 233 

35 Oakhursl Rd 

Cape Eh/abclh. ME 04107 
FINEGAN. CATHERINE V 224 

326 5lh Si NW 

Hickorv. NC 28601 
FINGER. CRAIG FRANCIS 124. 254 

118 Charles River Landing 

Williamsburg. VA 23185 
FlSk. ERIC EUGENE 54. 233 

P O Box 344 

Failh. NC 28041 
FISHBACK. NASON JR 127. 233 

423 8lh Si 

Brookings. SD 57006 
FITZGERALD. MICHAEL P 49. 56. 57. 145. 

291. 75. 

4109 Easlway Dr 

Charlolle. NC 28205 
FLANAGAN. WILLIAM F 54. 145. 291. 50 

2514 Hollingswonh Hill 

Ukeland. FL 33803 
FLANDERS. ELIZABETH B 78. 223 

2934 Palmer Ave 

Nc» Orleans. LA 70118 
FLEMING. JOANNA 128. 242. 40 

1970 Upshur Si- NW 

Washinglon. DC 2001 I 
FLEMING. JOHN DAVID 52. 242 

2651 Si Marys Sl- 

Ralcigh. NC 27609 
FLEMING. KENNETH MICHAEL 255 

924 30lh Cl 

Wesl Palm Beach. FL 33407 
FLEMING. MILDRED C 80. 81. 292. 293. 74. 

40 



6116 Si Andrews Ln 
Richmond. VA 23226 
FLEMMA. ROBERT JOHN JR 
8315 N River Rd 
River Hills. Wl 53217 
FLETCHER. MATTIE 191 
FLICKERBALL 160 
FLOOD. PAUL E 
PO Box 1359 
Fayellcville. NC 28301 
FLOYD. HUGH FERGUSON 72. 229. 75 
206 W Poinsell Si 
Greer. SC 29651 
FLUTE ENSEMBLE 76 
FOGLEMAN URSLLA 192 
FOLCHER. DEBORAH LYNNE 223. 233 
821 Albion Rd 
Columbia. SC 29205 
FOOTBALL TEAM 114 
FORD. JOSEPH P JR 31. 255 
2651 Laurelwood Rd 
DoraviUe. GA 30360 
FOREMAN. SYDNEY FANT 187. 224. 74. 
233 

225 Via Genoa 
Newpon Beach. CA 92663 
FOREMAN. TAMARA 1 10. //;. 224. 233 
9300 Navios 
Hunlsville. AL 35803 
FORIO. PHOEBE ELLIS 255 
2050 Counlry Squire Ln 
Mariella. GA 30062 
FOSSETT. SANDRA FRANCES 242. 37 
540 Clairemonl Ave 
Decalur. GA 30030 
FRANK. JEFFREY LEE 126. 127 
FRANK. STEVEN D 124. 130 
FRANKHOLSER. HULDAH M 106. 107. 242 
Rl 1 

Sylvania. GA 30467 
FRANZ. THOMAS JUDE 105. 235 
1306 Sherwood 
Glenvicw. IL 60025 
FRAZIER. SHERRI MARIE 91 
Rl 2 Box 137 
Claremonl. NC 28610 
FREDERICKSEN. JAMES M 202 
FREEMAN. DEBRA ELAINE 
PO Box 277 
Melrose. FL 32666 
FRENCH CLUB 92 
FRENCH. DIRK 202 
FRENCH. JANIE K 191 
FRENCH. WESLEY AARON 242 
3949 Vermoni Rd 
AUanla. GA 30319 
FRESHMEN 222-237 

FREY. ERIC CHARLES 145. 292. 293. 40 
969 Lindgren Blvd 
Sanibel. FL 33957 
FREY. WILLIAM F 203 
FRIERSON. ROBERT WILLIAM /;/. 293 
2305 Glen Haven 
Houslon. TX 77030 
FROST. CHRISTOPHER P 202 
FROST. LINDA 203 
FRY. PAUL JEFFREY 54. 234. 284. 233 
12300 Oakland Hills 
Concord. TN 37922 
FRYE. MARTHA LOU 293 
Plank Rd Box 835 
Robbins. NC 27325 
FRYMAN. DAVID BONNER 54, 227 
1948 Fishinger Rd 
Columbus. OH 43221 
FULLER. ROY CALHOUN 21. 242 
574 River Si 
Challanooga. TN 37405 
FULLERTON. SAMUEL C IV .'55 



WELCOME 
STODENTS 

Cards, gifts, & everything to make your room a 
home. 

Main Street 

Davidson, NC 

892-8242 

"Famous Since 1967" 



THE VILLAGE STORE 




352 INDEX 



/ 




FuquayVanna, North Carolina 

Highway i7 Wcsi Plio.i,- '>S2 1204 




7 



Michelin Steel Belted Radials 
Michelin Steel Belted Radial Retreads 



Awarded First Place at the 

1980 National Retreaders 

Convention, 



FuquayVarina, 
North Carolina 



ADVERTrSEMEMTS 353 



Box 1165 
Miami. OK 74.154 
KUNSTI-.N. JAMIS CHLRCHM-t 62. 70. N.t. 
.'J.' 

Oakic) Farm 
Warm Spriiif-%. VA :44»4 



GABl.t;. RAI PM W '« :i)_! 

<;aini:s. ricmard ki nm tii o:. .v 

.'.<>■. 2.1.1. ■».< 

734 N Halifax Or, 

Ormond Btach. H. .1M74 
t;AI II lY. SARAH lOUISI JJJ. -Ml 

15 Mamir Hill Rd 

Suniniil. \V O'")!!! 
(iARI)M R, K)SI Pll T JR H5. :o: 
(; \RM R II \ROI I) Br \l 



B.K 



»lM 



I Mil 



Banner I Ik. NC 1»M» 
(iARVIN. 1)1 AN Al AN //.^ 

3»6 IvCN Ave 

CarncVN Poinl. NJ 0X1161) 
GASTON. DAVID Alkl N .^J. JJ I 

1 4-' P,irk Dr 

C heMir. SC 29706 
(.ASTON. II^RRI1TT I. S7. .VJ. _MJ 

1)41 I Ml^L•nhclMlct Rd 

Charliilli:. NC :ii2l5 
(^MiCII. ( HRISTINi: lollSI hS. II.'. 

41 Manor Dr 

Bavkinf Ridfc. N.I invld 
(.A"! NOR. IDWARD I JR IS^. :i:. J'' 

Rl 7 Dundee I n 

Greenville. .SC ZIMK 
Gl Kil R. I I All II I/\B1 Til -■> -''J 

715 Ml Viev> Circle 

(iaineMille. GA 10501 
GHIS/. Dl VON C ATHIRINI .'J.' 

Rl 207 

Roek Tavern. NV 12575 
fiFl-l V, MARY ANN 4.1. 7;. 242 

51115 Norlhsidc Dr 

Mlanl.i. CiA .10.12H 
(;i PH RT JOHN R IV 126. (.'?. ."" 

»6 Herilatie Hill Rd 

Ne» ( .i.in. C T 06K40 
Gl RDI S I I I l\ Rl INI R m, 242 

m2 O.ikd.ile Rd Nl 

All.inl.i, GA 10107 
Gl RDI S, Pllll IPP GIORG 212 

KI2 OaVd.ile Rd Nl 

Ml.inl.i G \ 10107 
Gl RGOl DIN. RIC HARD I (//. .V4 

54011 I ic/huph Ave 

Richmond. VA 21226 
Gl RM N. II l/ABl Til ANN 221. 21J 

2K02 Mounl Vernon In 

Blacksburg. VA 24060 
<;KRMAN (MB '>2 
Gl Yl R. ANDRI A Wl BSTl R 11,(1. 11,1. 

2 '4 

626 GulKhore BKd S 

N.iplcN. I I 11140 
Gil Bl Rl, Jl I II SIMS 4.1. 145. I ill. /I, 

2IK1(I Riccrmoni A.e 12 

I vnchbuif. VA 24501 
GIDI /. Bll I ll/. Ilf 
GUIS, MARTHA IKl 

Gil IS, sTi PHI N Bll R( I i::. n. :<■ 

Rl 6 Box 220B 

Morf.mlon. NC 2X65^ 
(ill I I SPY MARK C ABOT 16 IJI. 2*-. 

uml John Ander^on Dr 

Ormond Be.ich. I I 12074 
Gil I II AND TANDY I Ml. 1.1. 2.5.5 

40011 N (ulUmac Dr 

Memphis TN mill 
(HIT ISON. ROHI RT U IV 41. <l, 57 j 

2.16. 25.5 

616"^ Wane Hill Rd 

V^illoui^hbv, OH 44014 
Gl AN( I ION\TII\N I 242, 411 

1120 BurkCNhorc Rd 

Winvlon Salem. N( 27106 
(il A/I . RIC HARD I DVSARD JR ^4 2 

5 10 Archer Rd 

V^incO.n Sjicnv N( 27106 
Gl I », IK>NA1 1) RAMSI A 54 

770(1 ( onneclicul Ace 

Cheic Chace. Ml) 2(K115 
(iODWIN. CI YDI m. KI 
GOI.FTK.AM 116 
GOODI . ANTHI A 4». :t,K 

The Oak> 

Rid)!e»a\ Rod 

Dorkin)[ 

Surrev. Ingl.ind 
(iOODI-. I l)\^ ARD SI DDON 216. 2'7. 



91.1 HawkinNlo»n Rd 

Sahsbur). NC 2m44 
(;OODMAN. 11 l/ABI Til IVV 4). 65, 242 

PC Box 607 

Candor. NC 27229 
GOODMAN. HA/I I D 192 
(iOODWIN. ANNl-: ITI/ABITH 6.5. W. •>!. 

221,. 2.U 

4II15/AI S -IIM Si 

Arlinplon. VA 22206 
GOODWIN. MARK HLTCHINSON 21^ 

1502 C hafum Rd 

Charle.lon. WV 25114 
GOODNOW. PHILIP M 25.5. 45 

150 Corlics Si, 

Providence. Rl 02904 
(GORDON. Pllll IP CARTIR /(),'. 4.5 

406 N VS.uerlv 

l.iriinillc. NC 27K2S 
GORHAM. MONK A I V NNl IMI. 221,. 221. 

2.14 

Cucumber Hill Rd 

FoMer. Rl 02S25 
GOUl D. ROBI RT ANDRI W M. 25.5 

K2-1 Saddlebrook 

Wecle> (hapcl. I I 11599 
(iRADUATlON 146 149 
(;RAHAM. JOHN HI RBI RT III 227 2'4 

1116 Highfield Dr 

Clearwaler. IT 11M6 
(iRAHAM. MICHAIT Tl RNIR r\ 242 

.157 Tremonl C irclc SI 

I enoir, NC 2X645 
GRAHAM, Nl( HOI AS t,.\ 144, 26,< 

16 Selbi Terrace 

Cumbn.i I npljnd 
GRANT. C V NTHIA T 2«-5 
GRANT. DAVID C 17. 95. 124. 211^ 
(iRANTHAM. VARDIT 1. G III 214, 2'- 



Billn 



: Dr 



C hjriolle. NC 2K207 
(iOOI)l . MIC HAIT ANTHONY 7il. 242 

2414 GlcniviHid Dr Nl 

Alljnia. (iA .10.105 
GCK)DI ITT. ANDRI I 242 



NC 



140 



GRAVl I 1 KIRK R 294 
X606 Tan^^ Dr 
Orl.indo, 1 I 12X11 
GRAVIS, RIC HARD C I I Ml NT 172. 75 
2419 l.exford 
HouMon. TX 770X0 
(iRAVI S. SI SAN JANI 224. 2.14 
171 Adams Si 
Millon. MA 021X7 
(iRAVTTT. SHARON III 4.1. 144. 145. 151 
IS7. 2*^4. 295 
1509 Cavalier Terrace 
(ireensboro. NC 2740X 
(iRAVI I V JOHN Wll SON ;/5 
7114 ( rCNcenl \cc 
GrccHMlIc SC 29(,01 
GR SI SI 1 \ 1 N P (6 1, 2vi" 
:i;i SuniUMdc \ve 
Uin-lnii Silciii, NC 271117 
GR \5 I HI (IIKIRI I I INT l/\ 242 
21sl WeMnmd Dr 
KinfNporl TN 17(>hll 
(,R\\ Bl Al DAW I S DAVID VI 
Rl 2 Box 106 
Denver. NC 2X017 
(iRhl-N. DAVID KI I TT/ 26. U. 144, 29J 
147 

27 I 2 Spencer Si 
Durh.ini. N( 27705 
GRI I Nl JAMA Bl AND 242 
27IKI Wilson I n 
Ralcifh N( 27(,09 
(iRI I K Jl Nl A1ARGARI T U. 224, 214 
1119 O.ikdale Si 
Windermere. I I .127Xh 
GRKiG. PAMIT I A ANN K. 214 
604 Thorncood ( i 
Jameclovin, N( 27202 
(iRII I IN, Al I IN WAVNl- 7. 11)1. 2.55 
101 W Conlederale Ave 
I ancacler S( 29720 
(.Rll I IN JOHNNY 1X4 
GRll 1 nil JOHN V IKII. IXI. 19S 
GRIlinil P\ll B|i(KIIV 14, /27 242, 
Direcloi Delense Nuclear Apencv 
Washinillon IK 2010^ 
GRIGGS I 1 (.1 Nl STI VI N 242 
I I 5 York Ave 
K.innapoli,, NC 2X0X1 
(iRIMlS. THOMAS DAVID 2<4 
110 Belaire Dr 
I ineolnlon. NC 2X092 
(iROVI , MARC IA MAY 294. 21< 
109 lorc-M Dr 
Pilicburgh, PA I'i21x 
(iRlBBA, Gl R \l 1) R(Kil R J / 5. / »l. I II. 
217 

4X90 NW 7ih Si 
Planlahon. II 11117 
(il 1 NTHI R. STI PHANIl I 255 IV 
R.H.kridge 

(ireenwich, C T 06X10 
(iHI RARI). ANNI BRANIORD 117. ml. 

61 Tradd Si 

C harleMon, S( 29401 
(.1 IST MOl SK 190 
Gl I I l( KSON lOHN R 1114. ;»v 

XX.50 w llSih Si 



Orland Park. II 60462 
(il I YN. PI Tl R DIMITIR I.I. .11. 

1 1 7 Pinelrc-e Rd 

SalKburc, N( 2X144 
(il. NN. ( HRISTOPHI R SAMPI I n 

214, 216 

20 John C jv.i I n 

Pcekvkill. NV 10566 
GYAIIC II. Bl Til I I I I N 144. /J5 : 

4511 1 ica Cl 1 

Monlgomerc. A I 16106 



H 



HAAS. IT l/ABI TH ANN 711. 2.55 

S071X Me.idoic (irecn IT 

Gr.miicr. IN 465.10 
IIAIGHT, S( OTT KI RR 49, -17. 242 

wo Spender Trace 

All.inl.i. GA lOllX 
HAIRSTON. PI Tl R JR 65 90. /M. 247. 

62 Murrac Blvd 

C h.irleslon, SC 29401 
IIAI I Al ISON Bl NNI TT 22.1. 2.14 

2IIS ( cd.ir I n 

PikesMlle KV 41"-0I 
HAl I , Al Rll TAI BOr St,. 1^7. 216 

221X1 Vallev Brook 

N.ivhvillc. TN 1721^ 
HAl I , ( C)l RTNI V DRI III. 226, 214 

11 (,ro>c»ood Rd 

A~he>ille NC 2SX04 
HAl I , DAVID 1 ARI 2'4, 216 

6120 Aberdeen Rd 

Shawnee MivMon. KS 6620X 
IIAI I J\( K Rll VIS 14, (4/. /49 

41110 (onu.ii V.illcc Rd 

All.inl.i (, \ 11112" 
IIAI I I \MI S M SKKll \M UK. 11,1 

72''6 I .i«lon 

Piiuburgh. P\ 1 W15 
IIAI I SI /\NN \ PAIGI 

102 Sh.iron I)r 

Norlh Wilkcsborn N( :Xhs9 
HM I W \RNI K I I ANDI R III 4r. 9J 

4 V,idkin llr 

R,ilcifli Nl n.09 
II \l I W II I I \M I Rl 1)1 RK K 214 

401K1 V ,,dkin Dr 

R,ilcifh Nl 2^609 
HAl I I R THOMAS B JR <2, 1 16, / ( 7, 

2X Third Si 

Pul.uki. VA 24101 
IIAI TON \t \Rk ROBI RT 296 

2611 RichardMin Dr 

I h.irlniie Nl 2X21 1 
II AM, SARAH I AT III RINI 242 

5.15 Timber Vallev Rd 

Allanla. GA 10142 
HAMIl TON BRIAN HIGH 14 242 

1 1511 Rullcdjie \cc 

Ih.irlnlic Nl 25; 11 
HAMIl ION Jl I I Rll S Mill k 41 111 



26^^ I lUood Dr 

All.inl.i GA linos 
HAMMOND MARK S II,. 124. 255 

41117 Idvcardc Mill Rd 

Raleiph NC 271,12 
HAMPTON GRVl W \lSON ^2, SV, I'o 

1207 k.in.iv.h.1 Terrace 

llunlinplon. W\ 25701 
II ANNA kl V IN RORV 1 1 <. 211, 

UOI N :ird Ave 

llolK.uod I I 11020 
H ANN \ll, RODI RH k \ l( TOR 19 

12 PmIK Dr 

llunnnflon NV 1 1 ^4 1 
11 A NT /Ml IN Rll HARD I I ARk 214 

1411 loxbrook I n 

( harlollcsMlle, V \ 22901 
IIARBI RT Mil HAl I SI\H>S()N 711. 1 1 <. 

211, 

1921 (ircenbrier Dr 

C harlollecvillc. V A 22901 
HARBIN, JA\H S 1)1 Rl k 242 

101 Woodbii.ir Dr 

I orevl (lie, Nl >|14 1 
HARBOTTI I I ISA MVRII 14, 77, I IK. 22 

2V>. ,17 

19(H1 Courlland Rd 

Alexandria, VA 22101. 
HARDI N JONATII \N HOI Dl R 4r. 2 '4 

27IK1 T«in lakev Dr 

Grecn>b,.r,. NC 2^411' 
IIARI AN. 1 IX.AR W Al I JR 19 <r,. > ' 

24.1 

I2XXI Nimev Dr 

Si l.iuic. MO 61141 
HARPI R I AN I C I NNINGHVM 224 

M 11. gh R..ek Rd 

W.,>l,,nd MA iir^x 
HARRIS, IHOM \S GRll R It,/,. 214. 21' 



127 Oakvidc Dr 
Harrivburg. NC 2X075 
HARRISON. ROBI RT I JR 



HARROI 1), MIC HAIT BRADI IV 



(ioldvb.iro. NC 27510 
HARRY Pllll IP SCOTT 22 

Hi.mcl.ind l.irm 

Rivcv.illc V A 227.17 
II \kl Bl \ I Rl Y J I AN 72. 

(.17 Ridi..c»..od 

Windermere, I I 127X6 
HART 1 I ORl NC r Ol IVIA 



107 



HARTMAN lOIIN MC VtASTI R 



1407 Me.id.mcrcvl 




CharlcMon, WV 25114 




HARTMAN MARkBINTlY 


46. //> 


I^OX Soulh P.irk 




kcids.ille Nl 27120 




II ARW K k M \Rk I IIARI 1 S 


24 1 


Rl : B.ix 119 




Bl.«.mvbur\. NJ IIXX04 




HASkl 1 1 JOHN RIC HARD 1 


'112. nil. . 


(6/, 296 




1X0^ R.illing Rd 




C hapcl Hill, N( 27M4 




HASTY, ( IIARI 1 S RANSOM 


JR 14. 2 


120 Sun Vallev Rd 




Alhenc, (iA 10605 




HASTY. 1 ISA ANNI HIS. 109. 


I1X. 144. 



II ATI III R W \l Tl R Bl N I AV1IN 
1119 I ,.ns.-lc.ir Dr 



II \ll II I II \RI IN G HI 



...d 1)1 



II \Wk I \MI S A 12. 

1 Mcclmt. Si 

I h,i(lcM..n SI 29401 
II AWk \ II TOR II 2 



sue 



M.. 



II \W kINS I'WII I A VNN 



HAV I R \Nl LS M 

1726 Grccnao.id I ircle 

Perrv G A 11069 
II AV, Jl ROMI lOI I ITT 1(1, II. • 

29119 I IiIImJc Rd 

kmp,p,.rl TN 17(,f,4 
HAV, SAM! I I Bl RNI V 111 214. 

KIOI S Dear.ng Rd 



1 1 A V 



\R Ml Bl RNI V 



I .ninglon, GA 10209 
HAY Wll I 1AM C RAKi 72. 
29119 ( liffcide Rd 
km)!sp..rl, TN 17664 
H AV I s Dl BOR Ml I V NN 



I Bl.< 



irgini 



Be. 



IIAV I S M \Rk PATRIl k 
24X4 W,„>dberr, Dr 
Wincl,.n Salem, Nl 27106 

[l\\ Nl S PATRIl IA C 29 



Rd 



M,. 



TN 



HAVNl S, TODD J A \H S /(I4, 



1410 ll.llabec Rd 

Alex.mdcr I lis M 1^ 

Ill Al V \Hl II \l I JOHN 



I IIKll C ripplegale Rd 
P..loniac. Ml) 20X54 
HI ATI! II I I Rl Y Till RSTON 
IM6 I rcsl»...Hi Dr 



III l)(.l PI TH Rl Nl I 1 HIS. 299, Ih. .V4 

209 1 Carolina Ave Nl 

Si Pclcrvbiirg, (il 11701 
HI I M M\RY MC NAIR '9 241. 17 

2M11 Kenvmglon Ave 

Richiii..nd. VA 21220 
nil VI Y, MARY S 192 
III Ml NW AV C IIARI OTTI C 1(*J. 1(1/ 

4X1^ R,.dman Si NW 

III NDRK kS ( INDY 257. <l) 
261 I (lark Rd 




Food i yiipm o nl Cont f <K l Conine 



Contractors of Food Service Equipment 
for Davidson Commons 



Raleigh. 
[North Carolina 



Cofpofair Adv«ftii 




OWARD ELECTRIC CO. o. 



CONCORD, IN 



Serving Since 1945 



INC. License #388U 

S.C. License #3582 

Virginia License #20888 



Electrical Contractors for Mary Irwin Belk 

Dormitory, 
Peter Knox Dormitory, and the College Commons. 



ADVERTISEMENTS 355 



Local Advertisement 



Join Mary and Murry for lunch or 
just a snack at . 




Home of the famous "BIG ORANGE." 



Serving delicious sandwiches, 

soups, shakes, specials, etc. 

Monday through Saturday 'til 3:30 pm. 

Main Street. Davidson. 



THE COPELAND HOUSE 
GALLERY 




FINE PRINTS 



ART SUPPLIES 



CUSTOM FRAMING 



N MAIN STREET, 

DAVIDSON 

8923005 



Tampa. FL 33618 
HENDRIX. JOHN DAVID JR. 56. 237 
I 12 Lord Ashley Dr 
Greenville. NC 27834 
HENSON. PAUL DOUGLAS 
420 Bramble Ln 
Roanoke. VA 24014 
HEPPNER. CAROL lOti. 1(17. 112. 113. J7 
4831 Fo« Glen Dr 
Mariella. OA 30067 
HERARD. LISA ANN 7<). JJJ. JO 
4135 Dogwood Dr 
Greensboro. NC 27410 
HERBERT. ROGER GORDON JR 49. 56. //< 
6415 Ovcrhill Rd 
Falls Church. VA 22042 
IIERLONG. JAMES RENE :27. 234. 7> 
620 Herlong Ave 
Rock Hill. SC 29730 
HERMAN. THOMAS WHITAKER 232 
22 Mill Sl 

Coopcrslown. NY 13326 
HERMETZ, TODD ALAN l]i. 229 
923 Morgan Ave SW 
Cullman. AL 35055 
HERNANDE/' CHIROLDES. J ALBERTO 

204 
HERRIN. JEFF 43. bi. 243 
Sl Georges Grenada 
West Indies -2070 
HERRINSTEIN. KARIS ANNE 72. 222. 234 
7706 Eagle Creek Dr 
Daycon. OH 45459 
HERRON. ELIZABETH B 243 
571 Kcelcr Woods 
Maricua. GA 30064 
HESS, PETER N 205 

HESSLER. DAVID PRATT 56. \bS. 234. 240. 
232 

8810 W Bonmwell Dr 
Mequon. Wl 53092 
HESTER. KAREN LYNN U. 144. 300. 301. 
60 

Rl 2 Box 368 
Lubbock. TX 79415 
HIGHT. WILLIAM B JR 205 
HIGINBOTHOM. JOHN P JR 243 
41 I Alabama Rd 
Towson. MD 21204 
HILL. ERIC WILLIAM 54 132. 133. 235 
1880 Pinewood Dr 
Fairnew, PA 16415 
HILL. MARIAN 110. III. 131 
3017 Fox Run 
Des Moines. I A 50321 
HILLEARY. BRENT C 39. 54. 55. SO. 81. S3. 
90. 60. 257 
Rl 2 Box 47 
Spring Cily, TN 37381 
HILLS. LAURA ANN 106. 107, 113. 131. 223. 
234 

219 N Phippcn Ave 
Dcland. FL 32720 
HINSON. MINOR THURLOW 165 237 
3701 Sharon Rd 
Charlolle. NC 28211 
HISSAM. THOMAS EDWARD 115. 234. 235 
7928 Scolland Dr 
Chagrin Falls. OH 44022 
HOBART PARK 70 
HOCKETT. ANNE BURTON .'-1.!. 37 
6 Lake Manor Cl 
Baltimore. MD 21210 
HODGES. CATHERINE B 240 
20 Highland Rd 
Weslporl. CT 06880 
HOFFMAN. JOYCE EILEEN 145. IS. 40. 41 
6 Loriann Rd 
Warren. NJ 07060 
HOFFMAN. KATHLEEN DIANE 283. 300. 40 
348 Valley Rd 
Faycllcvilie. NC 28305 
HOGAN, LINDA COLLINS 124, 125 223. 234 
Box 656 

Kcysville. VA 23947 
HOGAN. MORELAND A 204 
HOLDING. JULIE LYNN 70. 144. .tOO. .Wl 
285 Skyridgc Dr 
Allanla. GA 30338 
HOLLAND. JEFFREY LEE .<6. 234. 300 
1360 Mangel Way 
Dunwoody. GA 30338 
HOLLAND. JOHN CHARLES 145 
1151 Jackson Sl 
Pollslown, PA 19464 
HOLLAND. JOHN GILL 204 
HOLLINGSWORTH. MERRIS J.'. 110. /((. 
131. 243. 3 7 
2710 Wychffc Ave SW 
Roanoke. VA 24018 
HOLLOMAN, WILLIAM D III 46. 94. 329 
1110 Church Sl 
Scolland Neck. NC 27874 
HOLSHUIJSEN. HARRIET 106. 107. 143. 
247. 264. 266. 40 
Hollandscwcg 370 
6705 Be Wagcningen 
Holland 
HOLT. MARGARET BERRENA 142. 224. 
228. 257. 37. 357 



PO Box 819 

Burlinglon, NC 27215 
HOLTON. ELIZABETH BROOKE 257 

411 Holly Ln 

Chapel Hill. NC 27514 
HOMECOMING 138 
HONOR COUNCIL 62 
HOOKS, CHARLES ANDRIE «7. 115 

319 Oak Sl 

Sandcrsvlllc. GA 31082 
HOOPES. BARBARA JEAN 106. 107. 257 

1013 Woodsidc Dr 

Clcar*aler. FL 33516 
HOOPES. CAROL E 7. IS2. 243. 40 

1013 Woodsidc Dr 

Clearwalcr. FL 33516 
HOOPES, LINDA LOUISE »4. 283. 300. 301. 

S4 

1013 Woodsidc Dr 

Clearwalcr. FL 33516 
HOOTEN. JAMES PHILMON JR 39. 243 

2110 S Canlcrbury Rd 

Wilminglon. NC 28403 
HOOTS. JOHN HENRY JR 131 

3328 York Rd 

Winslon Salem. NC 27106 
HOOVER. DEBBIE 180. ISI 
HOOVER. WILLIAM DAVID JR 5S. 257. 45 

809 Country Club Dr 

High Poinl. NC 27262 
HOPGOOD. PAUL MAKIO 234 

Dcpcndenl Mail Sec 

Box 47 A PO 

San Francisco. CA 96301 
HOPKINS. JOHN I 145 
HOPKINS. ROBERT H JR 56. I6S. 22S. 234 

449 Fairmounl 

Chalham. NJ 07928 
HOPPER. KAREN FRANCES 6*. .'.57 

Rl 4 Box 436 

Versailles. KY 40383 
HORN QUARTET 76 
HORNE. ANGELA D 

2 Grove Cl SE 

Winlcr Haven. FL 33880 
HOSKINS. CARYN LOUISE 39. 243 

1214 Parson Sl. 

Corbin, KY 40701 
HOSKINS. DAVID SPRINGER 46. 47. 70. 

302. 303. 342. 97 

1214 Parson Sl. 

Corbm. KY 40701 
HOSKINS. JAMES CARLISLE 46. 234. 233 



I 



Pan 



1 St 



44. 



Corbin. KY 40701 
HOUCK. BRADLEY N 243 

96 Chalmers Dr 

Rochester. Ml 48063 
HOUSING OFFICE 182 
HOVET. KENNETH ORIAN JR 46. ; 

9901 Evergreen Ave. 

Columbia. MD 21046 
HOWARD. JAMES TURLEY 34. SO. 8 

302. 303 

4060 Robmwood Cove 

Memphis. TN 38111 
HOWARTH. KENNETH TODD 54. 5S. 234. 



3445 Harrowgale Rd 

York. PA 17402 
HOWE. TIMOTHY 26* 

61 Onslow Road 

Richmond. Surrey 

England 
HOWERTON. PHILIP T .102. .W3. 96 

244 W Park Dr 

Morganton. NC 28655 
HUBER. FLORENCE ENGLISH 223. 224 

4560 Harris Trail 

Allanla. GA .10327 
HUFF. KATHLEEN CANNON 2. 6S. 121. 

223. 234. 99 

655 E Stuart St 

Bartow. FL 33830 
HUGHES. JACKIE G IS4. 279. 307 
HUGHES, JAMES LOCKHART 46. 243 

172 Serpcnline Rd 

TenaRy. NJ 07670 
HUGHES. JOHN BLAKE .U. 133. 257. .(0 

209 Hickory Ln 

Moorcstown. NJ 08057 
HUGHES. SARAH RADFORD I6J. 223. 234. 

247 

2878 Normandy Dr 

Allanla. GA 30J05 
HUIE. DAVID LEE 320 

729 Kirk Rd. 

Dccalur. GA 30030 
HULBURT. LINDA JANE 4.1. 243 

1006 Dcwolfe Dr 

Alexandria. VA 22308 
HULETT. DEBORAH KIM 247. 2.57. 40 

410 N Mam Sl 

Arcanum. OH 45304 
HUMANITIES PROGRAM 20 
HUMPHRIES. LOUISE AUBREY .'.'4. 234. 

292. 74. 7.5 

2908 Lombardy Cl, 

Augusta. CA 30909 
HUNT. J RONALD 191 




HOLT Hosiery MILLS 

1 N C () R I' () R A T I-: I) 




Lee Ann 


Thatch 


Robert 


Debbie 


Wendy 


Kathryn 


Betsy 


Pete 


Mark 


Jeff 


Gus 


Lynn 


Second Rich 


Becky 


Rusk 


Bill 


James 


David 


Linda 


Merris 


Emmy 


Lisa 


Ron 


George 


Tonn 


John Miller 


Warren 


Carolyn 


Ann 


Mary Elizabeth 


Randy 


Tim 


Pat 


Donna 


Barbara 


Robin 


Barb 


Carrie 


Jamie 


Diane 


Dick 


Chris 


Thomas 


Agnes 


Jean 


Patty 


Steve 


Turley 


John 


Joan 


Lanier 


Howard 


Sally 


Kevin 


Elizabeth 


Andy 




Sam 


Jonathan 


Thanks for a great 


Follin 


Grace 


year. 
Magaret 



VICTORY PARTY: Margaret Holt and Jeff 
Wall receive congratulations for their victory 
as Freshman Advisors 



ADVERTISEMENTS 357 



HUNT. JbSSICA MACGOWAN 7.' 

8 Tjhanlo Si 

Concord. NH 03301 
HUNT. JOANNA RUTH ■I.I. 91. 2f7 

3SI6 Craighill Si. 

Lynchburg. VA 24502 
HURLEY. JACK SWITZER JR. SS. I6X 2-13 

112 Pcnn Si. 

BlucHcld. VA 24605 
HURT. ANNE SAMJ-ORD .'J.I 

5106 Hunlinf Hills Dr 

Rojnokc. VA 24014 
HUTCHINGS. ANITA SUZANNE 79. 2Ji 

J263 Imperial Dr. 

Macon. GA 3121 1 
HUTCHINSON. DAVID KNOW 54. 214. 23) 

612 Anson Ave 

Rockingham. NC 2».n9 
HUX. PETER PENTLEV 

10711 Midsummer l.n 

Columbia. MD 21044 
HYNDS. WALLACE STANTON 34. 141. 244 

6532 Sandalc Or 

Columbia. SC 29206 



IBRAHIM. GEORGE KAISSAR 22.5. 236 

5 Lakcvicw Place 

Smilhneld. NC 27577 
ILES. DONNA JEAN 66. 67. 224. 247. 2.57. 40 

2301 Fairmounl Ave 

Lakeland. EL 33803 
ILES. ROBERT ALAN WK. IM. 234. 23.5. 292 

2301 Fairmounl Ave 

Lakeland. EL 33803 
IMBROCNO. EDWARD PETER 116. /2<. 102. 

303 

3521 Willow Lawn Dr 

Lynchburg, VA 24503 
IMPARA. CAROL SUSAN 10. 70.2.57 

13001 Foxdcn Dr. 

Rockville. MD 20850 
IN THE BEGINNING AN AMBITIOUS 

DREAM 2-9 
INABNET. CATHARINE C 112 113. 144. 

159. J02. 303. 37 

2016 Si Andrews Rd 

Greensboro. NC 27408 
INFIRMARY 190 

INTERNATIONAL STl DENTS 264-267 
INTRAMIRAL SPORTS 158 
lORDANOU. MICHAEL 46. 122. 123. 25? 

147-33 Barclay Ave 



Hushing. NY 11355 
IVEY, FRANKLIN DELANO JR. ///. 130. 

131, 22». 234. 251 

1115 Gregory Ln. 

Slalcsville. NC 28677 
IVEY. WILLIAM LENTZ JR in. I6li. 234. 

232 

3462 Norlhshore Rd 

Columbia. SC 29206 
IVY. DAVID DUNBAR .56. 2.14 

601 Klein Si 

Vicksburg. MS 39180 



JACKSON, JEAN E 181 

JACKSON, MARGARET W 6.5. 302. 303 

120Counlry Club Circle 

Soulhcrn Pines. NC 28387 
J\tkSON. R BRUCE JR 20.5 
JACKSON. SHIRLEY 76 
JACKSON. WALTER H JR 12. 206 
JAMISON. PAUL KENT JS. 49. 304. .?05 

5221 Windmill Ln, 

Columbia. MD 21044 
JANNETTA. PETER T 2J7 

1269 Murry Hill 

Pillsburgh. PA 15217 
JAZZ ENSEMBLE 76 
JENKINS. RICHARD G 116. 117.40 

485 Ridgcwood Ave 

Glen Ridge. NJ 07028 
JENKS, ROBERT ALLEN 

Rl 6 Bo« 393C 

Lancaslcr. SC 29720 
JENNEY. SUZANNE POWERS 224 2.14. 75 

1406 Foresl Hill Dr 

Greensboro. NC 27410 
JERNICAN. JOSEPH CLARK .19 

Rl 3 Box 598 

Dudley. NC 28333 
JIMISON. SHERRILL D 3g. 39. 244. 311 

Rl 1 Bo« 704 

Canlon, NC 28716 
JOHN BELK DAY 154 
JOHNSON. DANIEL CLAYTON 2.14. 232 

Rl 3 Box 27S 

Concord. NC 28025 
JOHNSON. KAREN PATTON 94. 304. 305 

6392 Amberly 

San Diego. CA 92120 
JOHNSON. LAURA DAVIDSON 226. 2.1.5 

907 W Pearsall Si 

Dunn, NC 28334 



JOHNSON. ROBERT HARI E 2.15. 2.(6 

.505 Hale Ave 

Morrislown, TN 37814 
JOHNSTON, CHARLES LEIF 43. 122. 244 

3-509 Haslings Dr 

Richmond. VA 23225 
JOHNSTON. DOUGLAS 126 

42 River Wind Rd 

New Canaan. CT 06840 
JOHNSTON, TIMOTHY D .54. .5*. 244. .50 

825 Wcsl Dean Rd 

Milwaukee. Wl 53217 
JOLLY. CAROLE LYNN 143. 226. 2J.5 

1509 Scotland Ave 

Charlollc. NC 28207 
JONF.S. DEAN MOORE 3. 257. 45 

3535 Darlinglon Rd NW 

Canlon, OH 44708 
JONES. JAMES BENNETT 2-15. 7J7 

2475 Fonwood Dr 

Chapel Hill. NC 27514 
JONES. JAMES H 115. 257 

P O Box 3b 

Wilsonville. AL 35186 
JONES. JAMES LAWRENCE .54. 55, S3. 30- 



305. 



50 



I 126 Roundknob 

Salisbury. NC 28144 
JONES. MICHAEL ALLEN S7. 115. 130. 131. 

244 

Rl 1 Box 59 

Preslon. MD 21655 
JONES. PETER WILLIAM 244 

827 NE 154 Si 

Miami. EL 33162 
JONES. RENEE DENISE 2.57 

717 Wesl Sixlh Ave 

Birmingham. AL 35204 
JONES. RICHARD LEE 130. 131. 283 

25 A7alea Ave 

Salellilc Beach. FL 32937 
JORDAN, JEFFREY NEIL /.(, 120. 244. 7.5. 

256. 40 

851 Linda Ln 

Charloue. NC 28211 
JORDAN, PETER MANNING 34, 145, 304. 

305 

I Lilly Dr 

Fayelleville, NC 28305 
JUGGLING CLUB 96 

JUNIOR YEAR ABROAD PROGRAMS 30-33 
JUNIORS 252 261 



KADI, AMR EL 264 

The American Universily of Cairo 

113. Sharia Kasr El Aim 

Cairo. Egypl 
KANE. JEFFREY MARK 115. 244. 295. 45 

3919 Severn Ave 

Charlollc. NC 28210 
KANN. SUSAN BLAIR 224 

1495 Monlevallo 

Dccalur. GA 30033 
KAPPA ALPHA 34 
KARIS. MARGARET ANN 94. 95. 121. 163. 

305. 50 

3923 Si Marks Rd 

Durham. NC 27707 
KASH. GREGORY MASON 2J5 

2134 Randolph Rd 

Wilmington. NC 28403 
KAUFMANN, GREG 244, 40 

4210 Briarclifre Rd 

Winslon Salem, Nt 27106 
KAUFMANN, JOHN ERIC 244 

4210 Briarcliffc Rd 

Winslon Salem. NC 27106 
KAYLOR. MARILYN .10. 33 

740 Virginia Ave 

Davidson. NC 28036 
KAYLOR. ROBERT DAVID 14. 207 
KEAR. ROBERT JAMES JI5. 133. 171 

103 Burke Ci 

Buchanan. NY 10511 
KEHS, MICHAEL DAVID 4S. 49. 6.5. 72. SI. 

257 

4039 Land O Lakes Dr 

Allanla. GA .10342 
KEITH. ANNE HARVEY 244. 37 

2601 Sheffield Dr 

Gaslonia. NC 28052 
KEITH. JONATHAN SIMPSON 59, 281, J04, 

J05 

134 Inglcoak Ln 

Greenville, SC 29615 
KELLEHER, RICHARD BRYAN 4*. 49. .56 

57. 270. .?05 

2511 Burnl Leaf Ln 

Dccalur. GA 30033 
KELLEY. BARBARA E 66. 67. 81. 247. 257. 

40 

119 Erwin Rd 

Harlsville. SC 29550 
KELLEY. MICHAEL SAWYER 79. 244. 40 

1009 Churchwcll Ave 

Knoxville. TN 37917 
KELLO. JOHN E 207. 84 
KELLUM. GLENN OWEN 6.5. 306. 75 



Congratulations to the Graduates 




DaVidson lartan 
ScarVes . . . 

brushed Wool 
IZ" - 5^ " lon^ 




Hi^[anc{ Outfitters 
589 Atlanta Street/ ftDswfe[[ , Georgia 5C075 



'^04; 99Z-Z406 



THE 




CO. 



Henry H. Massey, Sr., Class of 1922 
William C. Massey, Class of 1924 

Henry H. Massey, Jr., Class of 1957 
Charles D. Massey, Class of 1959 



Mount Holly. 
North Carolina 




State SYILLE.N.C 



Thomas A. Slane, President, Class of 1963 
Fred T. Slane. Jr., Vice-President. Class of 1933 



MANUFACTURERS OF 



MIRSS^RS 



SINCE i9oe 



1 



ADVERTISEMENTS 359 



521 E College Si. 

Grirnn. GA 30223 
KELLY, ELIZABETH ANNE 224. 23f 

728 Scolland Ave. 

Rockingham. NC 28379 
KELLY. MARY GENEVRA I5S. -'57 

728 Scotland Ave, 

Rockingham. NC 28379 
KELTON. JOHN D 207 
KEMP. LOIS A 207 
KENDRICK. WILL DAVIS 52. 244 

419 Lansdownc Rd 

Charlouc. NC 28211 
KENNEBREW. ANDRE TYRONE H7. IIS. 

257 

533 Norlh Oakley Dr. 

Columbus. GA 31906 
KENNEDY. ROBERT E .'06 
KENNEY. JOSEPH MATTHEW US. !06. .107 

Rl. 2 Box 374 

Fennvillc. Ml 49408 
KENT. GEORGE ARTIS S2. 306 

1561 Gilmer Ave 

Monlgomcry. AL 36104 
KERR. BRADFORD MICHAEL 62. 306. SS. 

S4 

Upper Shad Rd 

Pound Ridgc. NY 10576 
KERR. JAMES KNOX Ml 257. J.< 

3949 Miruelo Circle N 

Jack.sonville. FL 32217 
KERR. NATALIE CHRISTINE 49. 110. /;;. 

244 

3421 Australian Ave 

West Palm Beach. FL 33407 
KESSLER. ELIZABETH ANNE 306 

2904 Ivanhoe Rd 

Tallahassee. FL 32312 
KESSLER. MARVIN 105 
KIDD. ROBIN C 170. 244 

PO Bo« 997 

ChieRand. FL 32626 
KIM. ESTER CHEERHYUN 224. 235 

4123 Kingswood Rd 

Charlotte. NC 28211 
KIMMEL. DONALD L JR 17. 20b 
KIMSEY. TODD GRANT 56. 122. 132. 133. 

134. 337 

220 Moss Side Dr 

Athens. GA 30606 
KINCAID. RANDALL R JR 168 
KING. HOPE MADELINE 244 

2521 Turnstone Dr 

Wilmington. DE 19805 
KING. JAMES TRAPNELL 34. 94. 306 



1129 Essex Dr 

Wilmington. NC 28403 
KING. LUNSFORD R .'07 
KING. NANCY DIANE 49. 244. 290 

4230 George Ln, 

West Palm Beach. FL 33406 
KING. REBECCA FRANCES 224. 235 

101 Wood Lily Ln, 

Spartanburg. SC 29302 
KING. RUSSELL M III 

4709 North 33rd St 

Arlington. VA 22207 
KING. STEPHEN CURTIS 229. 23S 

1865 Queens Way 

Chamblec. GA 30341 
KING, WAYNE 184 
KING. WILLIAM WALTER 244. 45 

210 Wilson Point 

New Bern. NC 28560 
KINSEY. JAMES JOSEPH 115. 235 

109 W Washington St 

La Grange. NC 28551 
KIRK, KFVIN THOMAS 46. 72. 237 

5105 Clear Run Dr 

Wilmington. NC 28403 
KISS. ELIZABETH ESTHER 64. 65. 144. 157. 

244 

6624 Skyline Ct 

Alexandria. VA 22307 
KISTLER. JEFFREY GREY 56. 57 

140 Crestview Rd 

Rocky Mount. NC 27801 
KLAHN. LISA ANN -':?6. 235 

39 Blackbriar Dr 

Colts Neck. NJ 07722 
KLAUS. SUSAN NE .'-'6 

Sudeten Stabe 6 

3550 Marburg 1 

West Germany 
KLEIN, BENJAMIN G, 207 
KLEIN, ROBERT OWEN .'57 

5429 Coliseum St 

New Orleans, LA 70115 
KLETT, DAVID RICHARD 235 

107 Jefferson Run Rd 

Great Falls. VA 22066 
KLINAR, DANIEL FRANKLYN 54.55. 95. 

114. 115. 144, 50 

321 Harrow Dr 

Columbia, SC 29210 
KLINGER, STANFORD N II5.130.\T,\ 

1653 Anna Place 

Atlanta, GA 30306 
KNOBLOCH, EMMY JEAN I2S. 129, .'57 

2575 Ardcn Rd 



Allanla. GA 30327 
KNOX. TERRY ANN 144. J09 

439 Tupchocken Si 

Reading. PA 19601 
KNUDSON. JEFFREY RUSSELL 54. 234. 

841 Shenandoah Rd 

Lexington. VA 24450 
KOOKEN. KATHRYN DREIER 164. 222. . 

235 

624 Friar Tuck Rd. 

Winston Salem. NC 27104 
KRENTZ. PETER M 21. 20S 
KRIEG. KENNETH JOSEPH 5.'. 58. 244 

57 North Si 

Logan. OH 43138 
KROTCHKO. JOHN FLOYD 65. 244 

218 Madison 

Linden. NJ 07036 
KUCERA. GREGORY LOUIS 70. 257 

4S60 Ellen Ave 

Pfafflown. NC 27040 
KURTTS. TERRY ALAN 164. 235 

3I05/FI8 Dauphin St 

Mobile. AL 36606 
KYLE. CONNIE 244. 50 

10085 Paradise Blvd 

Treasure Island. FL 33706 



LABBAN. GEORGE 12, 209 
LACKEY. NANCY LYNN 244 

Rl I Box 182 

Dallas. NC 28034 
LACKEY. WARREN RICHARD 244 

228 Edgedalc Dr 

High Point. NC 27262 
LACY, LAURA ELIZABETH 94. 257. 37 

43 Wakclec Ave 

Stratford. CT 06497 
LAMBERT, ROBERT TODD 46, /.'.', 123, .'44 

Rt 6 Box L56 

Flemington, NJ 08822 
LAMMERS, KATRINA JEAN 95 

P O Box 607 

Davidson, NC 28036 
LAMMERS, WILLIAM T 95. 209 
LAMOTTE, MARGARET ROSE 244 

2575 Davis Blvd 

Sarasota. FL 33577 
LANDESS. CHARLES BARTON 110. //(. 

130. 131. 309. 99 

258 Turkey Ridge Rd 

Charloltesvillc. VA 22901 



LANE. BECKY 39 

LANGLEY. WANDA GALE 308. 309. 37 

503 Love Ln 

Rockingham. NC 28379 
LAPPLE. ROBERT C 

88 Rolling Hills Rd 

Thornwood, NY 10594 
LARUS, JANIE PRESTON .'44 

Rt 2 Box 399A 

Richmond, VA 23233 
LASLEY, RALPH A 43. 65. 257 

1602 Chapel Hill Dr 

Alexandria, VA 22304 
LAUGHLIN, SARA SHERBURNE 58. 59. i 

244. 37 

1000 Baldwin Rd 

Richmond, VA 23229 
LAW, TIMOTHY HARDEN 237 

801 Houndslake Dr 

Aiken. SC 29801 
LAWING. WILLIAM DAVID 76. 209 
LAWLER. LISA GAIL 94. 133. 257 

Commanding Officer 

US Naval Air Facility 

FPO 

Seattle. W A 98767 
LAWRENCE. STEVEN J 39. 54. 119. 244 

1313 Bloomingdale Dr 

Cary. NC 27511 
LAZENBY. ALLEN 34. 126. 127. 244 

1206 Morris Ave 

Opehka. AL 36801 
LEAZER. JOHNNIE LEE JR 49. 56. 257 

Rt 2 Box 562 

Huntersville. NC 28078 
LEE. DAVID ALEXANDER 235 

5104 Newcastle Rd. 

Raleigh. NC 27606 
LEE. DEREK WILLIAM 46. 115. 244 

12911 SW 81st St 

Miami. FL 33183 
LEE. DICK -'.15. 232 

1205 Condor Dr 

Greensboro, NC 27410 
LEE, LYNN MARIE 

9454 Sappinglon Ave. 

Jacksonville, FL 32208 
LEE, WALTER EDWARD III 39. 88 

PO Box 737 

Waycross. GA 31501 
LEEPER, ANDREW J 46 

714 Apt I Mich Cl 

St Cloud, FL 32769 
LEGERTON, CLARENCE W 34. 144, .'57 

32 Council St 




OPEN 5 PM TO 10 PM MON -SAT 
PHONE 664-3943 



LITTLE SPAGHETTI HOUSE 







Mooresville. North Carolina 



Charleilon. SC 34401 
I K.I RTON. MARY PRIN(.I I- 1*0. .V«. .'Il 

J: C'uuncil Si 

Charlmun. SC :440l 
I EMAN. JOSFPM TRENT 4t>. 41. Wl 

7540 NW 6lh (1 

PUnuiiun. II nil 7 
LEONARD niOMASHI IIIN :u. .Ml, I.V) 

1725 Mindiui Blvil 

Birminihjm M I5:iw 
lESHER. MIIINDA K 10». .'OV 
LESTER, MAI I 1)1 M .'(N 
LETT. lARI l>\l WNI //V.'.'K 

Rl 6 I opcbnd Hil 

Poocll. TN \J»49 
LEWIS. CYNTHIA \2. Ml 
I 1 WIS. ELIZABETH ALLISON lOK. I(W. 16. 

17 

XOII Glen Eden Or 

Riilcijh. NC ;7m; 
LEWIS. K.I NNLTM BAM R JR JU <!•. .'44 

6411 Kcnlcigh Kd 

Biiiiimuic. Ml) :i:i: 

LEWIS. STEPHEN Jl I LRLY m. w .'JJ 

3400 Onandjgj Dr 

Columbuv OH 4i:;i 
LIBRARY OFFirr.S 143 
I HER. I EISA (lERI KNE .'4. 104 

6613 Corsica Or 

Memphis. TN IBIIH 
I IIEORO. C lURI IS E JR //.<. .'4.<. .<0 

Rl I Toulcs Bend Rd 

Kno«ville. TN 17414 
LIGO, LARRY L -'0« 
KIM. KENG SOON }J5. .'J.' 

32 Jalan Bcsi 

Green Ljnc 

Pcnang. Malaysia -1135 
LINCOLN. DAVID MARSTON 54. 116. 117. 

:n 

107 Garfield Rd 

Weal Hanford. CT 06107 
LINO. SHERRI KAY .'.U .M.< 

805 Pheasant Run 

Wcsl CheMer. PA 14)80 
LINDSEY. EDWARD H JR <.'. 6.'. 6J. JOS. 

im 

l]4 Brighton Rd NE 

Atlanta. GA .10.104 
LINDSEY. ELIZABETH D 2i7 

134 Brighton Rd NE 

Allanta. GA 30304 
LINDSEY. GLENN C .'// 
LINDSLEY. JANET E .'.'.'. 2ii 

10 Woodhull Rd 

East Setauket. NY 11733 
LITTLE. GEOFFREY OWEN 92 

1214 Pcachtrcc Bll Ave 

Atlanla. GA 30137 
LIVING ENDOWMENT OFFICE 143 
LLOYD. CHARLES E 81. I$0. 151 
LLOYD. HAROLD ANTHONY J4. 145. I/O. 

311 

811 4th St 

North Wilkesboro. NC 38654 
LOCKWOOD. CHRISTOPHER L tii. 2611 

16 Lonsdale Road 

Barnes 

London SW 13 

England 
LOCKWOOD. MICHAEL OWEN .<-'. /.'.'. .'J.( 

1155 43nd Ave 

Vero Beach. Kl. 33460 
LOFTIN. WILLIAM EARL JR 5.'. 87. }I0. 

Jll 

3101 Sagamore Rd 

Charlotte. NC 38204 
LOGAN. BRET BYRON 4J. 24S 

510 E 86lh St 

Nc* York. NY 10028 
LONG. C VINCENT 111 )I0 

3814 N Fairway Dr 

Burlington. NC 37315 
LONG. KAREN JO JJ. 70, JIO. 311 

1405 Emroywood Rd 

Rural Hall. NC 27045 
LONG. PATRICIA E 62. 108. 222. 336. .'57. 

37 

5318 Olympia Fields 

Houston. TX 77064 
LONG, RODERICK RLIFUS 68. 72. 42. 24S. 

40 

6431 Woodville Or 

Falls Church. VA 33044 
LONG. ZACH I9f 
LOPTSON. CAROL JEAN 310. 311 

6 Blackfoot Rd 
Trenton. NJ 08638 

LORD. MICHAEL JEROME .'4-< 

7 Alamo Ct 

Lake City. FL 33055 
LORENZEN. TIMOTHY ROBERT .'.57. 45 

320 Santiago Dr 

Winter Park. FL 33784 
LOVE. REBECCA JEAN 330. 257 

617 Carolina Ave 

Gastonia. NC 28052 
LOVETT. CHARLES CANDLER 21. 65. 137. 

234. 23f 

1443 Robmhood Rd 



Win.ton Salem. NC 27104 
lOWI. BRYAN (. 46. 47. 114. (/V .'45 

.'UOO ( jpital I anding Rd 

WilliallKbulg. VA 31185 
I OWE. NAN( Y I OLISL .'t? 

647 Willivcc l>r 

Dcijtur <;a lUOll 
lOWE. STI PIILN CABRII I 46.47 <«. /M 

345. I/O. )// 

8630 SW 147 St 

Miami. H 1)|5|| 
I llEC KER. CIIARI ES TIIIERY *.' »«. 81. 

38), 312. II I 

3447 Grant St 

Evanslun. II 6(i:ill 
I IJSK, JOHN Al I XANDLR IV ««. .'41 

)l)3 Northampton Dr 

CJreensboro. NC 37408 
I UTZ, ADEIYN BROWN 17. 128. 134. .'.'4, 

.'15 

831 lla»thornc Rd 

Shelb>, NC 38150 
I YDAY, JOHN BREVARD .'15 

33)3 Sherwoud Ave 

Charlotte. NC 38207 
I YERI V, WAI KER IV f8. 236 

1405 Ninth St NW 

Hickory. NC 28601 
LYNSKEY. JAMEJs //5 
LYONS. DAVID WILLIAM 247. 284. 312 

40*5 Becchivood Dr 

Atlanla. CiA 10)37 



M 



MCALISILR. MMBI RLV ANN 79. .'4.5. 36. 

37 

3625 Windblufr Dr 

Matlhc»s. NC 38105 
MCARN. MARCiARET HUNTER .'.'.'. .'.15 

501 Wilkinson Dr 

Laurinburg. NC 38353 
MCARN. SUSAN HOPE 62. 63. 9.5. ///. 128, 

129. 144. 312. 41. 148 

501 Wilkinson Dr 

Laurinburg. NC 28352 
MCCALL. BENJAMIN W JR 46. 70. 144. 

312. 342 

802 Our Ln 

Houslon. TX 77024 
MCCALL. BRADLEY TODD .'.'.5. 236 

435 Scolts Way 

Augusta. GA 30404 
MCCALLIE. WILLIAM A 10. 34. 80. 81. 94. 

/.'.'. -'57 

16 Shallowford Rd 

Chattanooga. TN 37404 
MCCAMY. MARY STL ART 173. .'75 

3215 Glen Ardcn Dr 

Allanta. GA 30305 
MCCARTY. KATHY LYNN .'.'4. 235 

13303 Manvel Ln 

Bo»ie. MD 20715 
MCCLINTOCK. LYNN 31. 32. .'57 

1813 Oak Park Or N 

Clearwater. FL 33516 
MCCONNELL. THOMAS JOSEPH lOS 

658 Dunser Si 

Pittsburg. PA 15226 
MCCORKLE. FRANCES C 184 
MCCORMACK. ELIZABETH H .'57 

7373 Chflon Rd, 

Clifton. VA 33034 
MCCORMICK, ANGUS LEE 68. 60 

305 W Blue Si 

Si Pauls. NC 38384 
MCCORMICK. JOHN GORDON 39. .'45 

450 Wayne Ave 

Indialantic. FL 33403 
MCCOY. JOHN MARTIN 312 

3036 Sharon Ln 

Charlolle. NC 28211 
MCCULI.OUCH. LUCY L .'45 

Christ School 

Arden. NC 28704 
MCCURRY. DAVID SCOTT 6.5. 68 

35 Sulphur Springs 

Asheville. NC 28806 
MCDARIS. KEVIN K .'45 

1602 Mounlainbrook 

Huntsvillc AL 35801 
MCDONALD, GARY HLOWELL .'45 

4725 Brown Rd 

Jonesboro. GA 30236 
MCDONALD. JOHN LEE 39. 257 

126 S Van Buren St 

Rockville. MD 20850 
MCDONALD. KARI KIRSTEN .'45 

Rl 5 Maple Or 

Laurinburg. NC 28352 
MCDONALD. MOFFATT G 90. 91. 116. 144. 

23S. 236. .'57 

134 Rutlcdge Rd 

Greenwood. SC 24646 
MCDOWELL. JOHN ADAMS JR .'45 

46 High St 

East Willislon. NY 11546 
MCFAYDEN. GREGORY ALFRED .'45 

Rl. I 



Ellcrbe NC 3>ll> 
MCIAOYLN Wll I lAM ( 4«47.<4^ 

2508 N Ed|c»aler Di 

la)Ctlcvillc. N( 38)0) 
MC(il ACHY JOHN A JR /4l .'// 
MCGIIRI MATTHI W SLAN 

Unu M.IJ4VC liail 

Maitland I I 13751 
MCINTYRL MARGARLI Jl AN 

Rivei Rd 

Lyme, Nil 0)768 
MOUNKIN, JOHN HOUSTON .'17. 41) 

634 Dogwood Rd 

Stateiville. N( 28677 
M( KEAN, THOMAS ARTHUR 

1417 Coulee Ave 

Jacksonville, II )33IO 
MCKEITHLN, MEI ISSA KAY 44 .'4S 

411 N Ninth St 

Albemarle. N( 28001 
Ml Kl I WAV, ALEXANDIR J 161. 210 
MCKINl FY. EVVA 100 
MIKINSEV. PATRICK D JR 23. 34. 94. J/.' 

3417 Aha Visia Or 

Chattanooga. TN 37411 
MCLAIN. JAMFi IIS 

Rl 1 Bo< 167 

Clio. SC 34525 
MCLEAN. DAVID COSTEN JR .5.'. 9.5. 314 

550 Wisteria Dr 

Florence. SC 34501 
MCLELLAND. JAME^ G JR 49, 5ft. //< .'45 

Rl Bo< 188 

Statesvillc. NC 38677 
MCMANIS. MELISSA ANN .'.'4. 23S 

117 Woodcrcek Rd 

Bedford. VA 34533 
MCMANUS. RANDY DAVID 110. ///. 130. 

131 

43 Cayuga St 
Auburn. NY L1021 

MCMASTER. BRIAN FOSS 

Rl 1 Pembroke St 

Suncook. NJ 03275 
MCMICHAEL. PETER D 56. 234. .'J5 

Rl 2 Box 348 

Reidsulle. NC 37330 
MCMILLAN. ANN H 13. .'// 
MCMILLAN. CATHERINE L 77. .'46 

3135 Clarendon Rd 

Charlotte. NC 38311 
MCMILLAN. ELIZABETH H 58. 246. 89 

3801 Bonwood Or 

Charlotte. NC 38311 
MCPHAIL. ELIZABETH LEE 34. 128. 246 

1106 Roundhill Rd 

Greensboro. NC 27408 
MCPHERSON. DOUGLAS C J/4 

1101 S Arlington Ridge Rd 1113 

Arlington. VA 22202 
MCSWAIN. JEFFREY YATE.S 103. 115. 235 

44 Berkeley Rd 
Avondale Estates. GA 30OO2 

MACCONNACHIE. JOANNE .'57 

PO Bo< 2065 

Anderson. SC 24622 
MACCORMAC. EARL R 15. 210 
MACWILLIAM. STEWART B .'J.5. .'6* 

Rl 1 Box 45 

Tryon. NC 28782 
MACAULAY. WILTON CLAY 34. 144. 224. 

236. 314. 315 

355 W Kivett St 

Asheboro. NC 27203 
MACK. BARRON BAYLES JR 58. 91. 235. 

236. .'57. .50 

122 Confederate St 

Fort Mill. SC 24715 
MACK. FRANCES ELIZABETH .'.'.'. 235 

133 Confederate St 

Fort Mill. SC 34715 
MAINEILA. PAUL JOSEPH 246. 40 

30 Linden Rd 

Barrmgton. Rl 03806 
MAINTENANCE DEPARTMENT 184 
MALE CHORUS 74 
MALONE. JOHN HODGE 15. 235 

143 Tusedo Dr 

Thomasville. GA 31742 
MALONE. MARY A ^46. 37 

637 Windsor Place NE 

Concord. NC 38035 
MALONE. RANDOLPH A IV 80. 81. J/4 

143 Tuxedo Dr 

Thomasville. GA 31742 
MALONEY. SAMUEL .'// 
MANOELL. PENNY KATHERINE J/4 

87 Connctquot Rd. 

Bayport. NY 11705 
MANGELSDORF.CAROLYN E. 257 

835 7th St 

Oakmont. PA 15134 
MANN. JEFFREY STEPHEN 56. 65. 229. 

235. 24 

1656 Ounwoody Square 

Dunwoody. GA 30338 
MANN. JOHN WALTER III 246. 45 

1416 High Acre Rd 

Bedford. VA 24523 
MANN. LOUISE SLATER 80. 81. 314. 315. 40 



4464 Park Am 

Mcmpti.. IN III 17 
MANMSr, ROBLKT I /W 151. 210. 24 
MARKHAM ( URTIS REIO 215 



He 



., Cl 



Stone HutiMaiii OA HlOU 
MARSHAII DEIWIRAMGRANT J/4. Hi 

17 

n Roxmere Rd 

C umbciland Rl »3>A4 
MARSHAII JUMNUIANJR 4). 31*. 37 

365 Bai«b<«>|e Rd 

( amilla (iA )I7|0 
MAHSHALI JOHN DODOS .>4« 

Rl I) Bos 227S 

Tallahasm. FL 12)12 
MARSHAII , I UCY LUNN 77. }4t. SO 

402 Oak Foreu Ave 

Baltimore MD 3I32I 
MARSHBLRN CHRISTOPHER S 246 

717 Monmouth Way 

Winter Park. H 12742 
MARSHBLRN. THOMAS M 16. 19 92. 2S7 

3520 Henderson Mill 

Atlanta. GA )0345 
MARTIN HAROLD I JR .'46 40 

528 W Parkway 

High Point. NC 27262 
MARTIN. KEITH ANTHONY 44. IIS. 2U 

Jackson Ave 

Gray. GA )I0)2 
MARTIN. LFROY BROWN III 125. 234. 23S 

501 5 Glenwood Ave 

Raleigh. NC 27612 
MARTIN. MARY VINCENT H 112. 113. 224 

540) Jenneu Cl 

Louisville. KY 40222 
MARTIN MRS D GREER 84 
MARTIN. SANTFORO F 181 
MARTIN. STERLING T JR 110. ///.III. 

130. 131 
MARTIN. THOMAS ALLEN 257. 4S 

14314 Appletrce 

Houston. TX 77074 
MASHBLRS JAMES W JR 54.111.119. 

234 

601 Pinelree Dr 

Decatur, GA 300)0 
MASON. ELIZABETH DAVIES 23S 

360 Chamounix Rd 

St Davids. PA 14087 
MASON. LEON 115. 234. 235 

760 Fearon Ave 

Mouni Dora. FL 32757 
MASON, MICHAEL DEAN 39. 65. .?4« 

168 Lake Forrest Ln 

Allanta. GA 30342 
MASSEY. CAROLINE CYNTHA 49. /75. 246 

5700 Lansing Or 

Charlotte. NC 28211 
MATTHEWS. COY RANDOLPH 

715 E Kingston Ave 

Charlotte. NC 28203 
MATTHEWS. DONALD KENNETH 95. 124. 

88 

415 Early Si 
Fayeltev.lle. NC 28301 

MAXWELL. BLAIR ADAMS 5.'. 246 

Rl 3 Box 381 

Oswego. NY 13126 
MAYDOLE. ROBERT E 211 
MAYEJi. DEIRDRE A 106. 107. 112. II) 
MAYFIELD. JOHN MILLER 4a 4/ 

5015 Ridgeview 

Waco. TX 76710 
MEDIA BOARD 60 
MEDLIN. ELIZABETH W 79. 144. J/7. 60. 

J 7 

1056 Kenleigh Circle 

Winston Salem. NC 27106 
MEDLIN. PAULA RIDGELY .'46, J7 

1056 Kenleigh Circle 

Winston Salem. NC 27106 
MEEKS. PATRICA H 142 
MEETZE. GROVER C JR 185 148 
MELE. ALFRED R 15 213 
MELTON. MARY CAMBRIA 77. 79. 166. 223. 

224 

822 Concord Rd 

Oindsoo. NC 28036 
MERRELL. MATTHEW BOYD ^J« 

416 BUir Rd 
Vienna. VA 22180 

MERTEN. JOEL ARTHUR 103. 160. J/6. J/7. 



6316 Cambridge Ave 

Cincinnati. OH 45230 
METZEL. DANIEL PHIPPS 77. .'J4 

1707 Stuan Ave 

Petersburg. VA 23803 
METZGAR, DEBRA ANN «». .'.'4. 40. 251 

424 Ivy Crest Terrace 

Dayton. OH 45424 
MICHEL. FRANCIS WILLIAM 125. 246 

7l9ChnUine 

Palo Alto. CA 44303 
MID-WINTERS 140 
MIDIS. MILTON PANGS 316. 317. SO 

9403 Kingsbridge Rd. 

Richmond. VA 23233 



ADVERTISEMENTS 361 



Mills, ttll 1 lAM ANIJl RSON <-'. :»S 


Trouiio.m N< :Kll.f. 




PO Buk 41 


MOORE ROHI RTSON 1 \l AR Js 




Locusl V.ilky. NY 1 ISM 


1048 Arbor Rd 




MILLKR. ANDREA i; R ::J. .M< 


Winsion Salem. M. 2711)4 




1020 Kdcn Dr 


MOORI SI /ANSI M\RII .'.<(( 




Nccnah. Wl iWSb 


1 IK Ml \ernon \»e 




MILLKR. KATllV LOIS 


l).,n>,llc VA 24541 




l«l Norlhmoor Rd. 


MOOKI TIH)M\S 1)1 1)1 1 Y <2. 2 


Jft 


CjNNClbcrr). KL .12707 


22 1 ilgcbrovik In 




MILLKR, PATRici.A D ::. i:-i. i:s. 1:1 


Monscv. N\' ll»52 




MILLER, ROBERT JOSEPH llf. .V7 


MOORE. THOMAS kl 1 1 \ U. 21ft 




4.S South Main Si. 


719 W Pine Si 




Middlovillc. NY 1.1406 


Johnson C ilv. TN 176111 




MILLER, STEPHEN JOSEPH .'J6 
Rl 1 

l.jwndaic. NC 2KW0 


MOREI 1 . C \TIIARIM \NN /Oft 


111?. 


1 2 Apple Tree (. lose 




MILLER. WILLIAM ALl EN Jft. :4t. 


Chappjuu.i. \V 10^14 




f>6.'- Ora Dell Ave 


MORCiAN. GRACE PORTI R /2.<. 


29 


Tilusvillc, EL ,12780 


1121 Brool>»oiHj Rd 




MILLS, LESLIE LYNN JJf.. u .17 


Birmingham. Al ls221 




1 5.1 HcriLigc Place 


MOR(iAN. JAMIS HANI 1 III ft.l 


82. : 


MooreMille. NC 2SII5 


21ft 




MINGO. YVETTE CECIl.E -ll. 87. :4t, 


51^ llih Ave 




6-100 Carlers Ln 


llumingl..n. WV 2^7111 




Rivcrdalc, MD 20840 


MORRISON. JOHN S 2/1 




MINTER. WINERED P .';.' 


MORRISON. MIRANDA 2ft.< 




MISCELLANY 70 


28 Eslboiirne Park Ro.id 




MITCHEI 1. \NN MAI.ILI ft? -V-). .'.1< 


1 ondon. W2 sPII 




212 King Si 


England 




Mounl Plea^anl. SC Itihi 


MORRISON W II 1 1 \M H IV s.' 


'Jft 


MOBI EY HERBERT V. JR .'■•> 


Rl 9 Rolhiig Hill Dr 




Rl 1 Bo\ 81 


M.mrne \( 2X1111 




Wajnesboro, GA 10810 


MORROW Jim RN Will lAM 1 


0. // 


MOFIETT. STEPHAMI H (.17. J2A. -M.<. 


.-1 IM>. UK 




209 WeM C ollcje Si 


981 Haniplon Place 




Obcrlm. OH 44074 


Mooresville. NC 281 15 




MOHORN. HAROLD WAYNE .<_'. .'.<» 


MORROW, Tl RRY Al 1 E\ //(). / 


/. -1/ 


.■iSOS WcMfield Dr 


P Box 90 




Greensboro. NC 27410 


Mooresville, NC 2811^ 




MONROE. HLiNTER KELLY <J. >S. 11. .V 


J, MORROW, VIRCilNIA (iA"! 1 1 16, 


-17. 2 


2.14. 2.l.<. *4 


P Box 407 




404 1 >ons Rd 


Limalilla, El 32784 




Chapel Hill. NC 27.SI4 


MOSCA, RALPH SAI VATORI 49, 


9s'. / 


MONROE. JOHN T III .U. .1/7. .(0 


145, 2W, .US. ,1/9 




404 1 son.s Rd 


8 1 incoln Rd 




Chapel Hill. NC 27514 


Bclhpage, NY 11714 




MOODY. SARAH 4V. 246. 7.'! 


MOUSSALI, CHRISTIANE .19. l/.s 


.1/9 


6404 kcnncd\ Dr 


3210 Norlhamplon Dr 




Chcvj Chase. MD 20015 


Charlollc. NC 28210 




MOORE. ANDREW CECIL III /_'-'. 121. 28 


MOWBRAY. MIRANDA /2/. 2ft* 




.1(7 


19. Woodsford Square 




105 Malcolm Ln 


London. W 14 




Signal Mounlain. TN 37377 


England 




MOORE. JAMES GOMEZ 10. 229 


MUl 1 IS. ROBERT BRADLEY .< 1 


1. 24 


Rl 1 Bo« 207 


35IX) Woodmerc Place 





.-^r^T>. 



TVestern Steet 

Family 

STEMKOVSE 




Mooresville, N.C. 





dmk 



Corpuatr AdvMtikrmmi 



Every Color Under The Sun 




TASCARORA YARNS, 

INC. 



Martin B. Foil. Jr.. President 
Class Of 1955 



Mount Pleasant, 
North Carolina 



ADVERTISEMENTS 363 



Winsloii Salem. NC 27106 
MUMY, SARAH ELLEN 79. -/ft 2fS 

421 Kyle Rd. 

Wirslon Salem. NC 27104 
MUNGER. KATHY LEE 49. 2S8 

P O Box 4 

Golha. F L 32734 
MURAKI. MASAYASU 264. .'67 

Hibangoaka 2-7-36 

Takara/uka Hyogo 665 

Japan 
MURPHY. MICHAEL DURANT ■)9. f6 

188-47 Jordan Ave 

Holli^. NY 11412 
MURRAH. KENNETH h JR 

1601 Legion Dr 

Winlcr Park. FL 3278Q 
MURRAY. KATHRYN RUTH 70. :-IS. fO 

4308 Excler Close 

Allanla. GA 30327 
MURRELL. GEORGE LEE M 2«. fO 

314 HcanhMone Rd 

Columbia. SC 29210 
MURREY. MARSHALl CARY U. _'4»' 

R R 6 Bo> 440 

Pulaski. TN 38478 
MURRY. CRAIG 9f 
MUSICK. ALICE A }l. :fiS 

C/O Carl Musick 

8710 Donna Gail Dr 

Austin. TX 78758 
MUSKOF^. JOHN PAUL. JR -'^6. .\W 

2344 Brnlon Rd 

Columbus. OH 43221 
MUTCHLER. DAVID C 21} 
MYERS. CHLOE N 188 
MYERS. FRANK EBFRT JR 16.1 247. 285. 

40. 2.<9 

4223 Sylvia Si 

Winslon Salem. NC 27104 
MYERS. ROBERT A .'/.' 
MYERS. SCOTT WOODARD _'J9 

27 Perdicans Place 

Trcnlon. NJ 08618 



N 



NABHOLTZ. CATHERINE F ANNE- 
MARIE .'67 
Che? Mr Rollandin 
122 Bd Rabalau 
Marseille BOlO 
France 

NASH. BRIAN WAYNE .'.59 



Rl 6 Bo« 666 

Monroe. NC 28110 
NASH. LINDA CAROL 24S 

2831 441h Si NW 

Washinglon. DC 20007 
NAVARROJIMFNF/. SILVIA F 264. .'6.5 

Sanla Maria Magdalenj 

N 40 Madrid 16 

NEAL. SALLY REBECCA 6.5. J/S. 36. J7 

10 Pelerborough Dr 

Norlhporl. NY 11768 
NEALE. VICTORIA ANNE IM. .'.'.'. 2)6 

PO Box 249 

Rulhcrford Col. NC 28671 
NEEFUS. PETER CARL J9. .5^. 6.'. SI. 143. 

MS. 319 

706 Wcslovcr Terrace 

Greensboro. NC 27408 
NE1SLER. DAVID CARL .'.59 

403 Ncisler Dr 

Kings Mounlain. NC 28086 
NEISLER. WILLIAM HAYNE 4f 

403 Neisler Dr 

Kings Mountain. NC 28086 
NELSON. CORA LOUISE 213. 270. 252 
NELSON. RANDY F 151. .';_? 
NESTER. ALBERT DWAYNE 40 

106 Woodbourne Dr 

Lynchburg. VA 24502 
NEWCOMB, JOHN TIMBERMAN 43. 70. S3. 

144. 145. 150. If I. 60. 320. 321 

26 Howland Rd 

Ashcvillc. NC 28804 
NEWMAN. MARK GILDWELL .5J 

15 Lake Crcsl Dr 

Columbia. SC 29206 
NEWSOME. JAMES DANIEL 4f 

329 Durand Falls Dr 

Decalur. GA 30030 
NIBLOCK. JOHN F 145. 321 

US Aid 

Box 4 A P O 

San Francisco. CA 963.56 
NICHOLLS. PETER ISS 
NICHOLS. CHARLES KNERR 30. 31. 32. 2f9 

403 Lynncresl 

Challanooga. TN 3741 I 
NICHOLS. DAVID ARNOLD llf. 131. 132. 

133. 144. 147 

Rl 1 

Slcele, AL 35987 
NICHOLS. ROBERT TATE 46. I If. 133. 236 

1150 Rankin Si C/6 

Slonc Mountain. CA 30083 



NICOLAIDES. MELIS P 24S 

PO Box 186 

Limassol. Cyprus -0480 
NICOLETTE. NICHOLAS A 46. 321 

23 Second Si. 

Porl Jcrvis. NY 12771 
NIELSEN. JEFFREY WINTHER .5.'. 24S 

8460 Philrosr Rd W 

Jacksonville. FL 32217 
NIEPOLD. JOHN ROBERT 229. 236 

1230 Galleon Dr 

Naples. FL 33940 
NOAKES. WENDY BURNETT .'.'?. .'I6 

4295 Barnell Shoals 

Athens. GA 30605 
NOBLE. MICHAEL B 

Rt 4 Box 37 

Winchester. VA 22601 
NOCK. SARAH BRITTINGHAM 24S. fO 

P O Box 296 

Onancock. VA 23417 
NORFLEET. AGNES WINSTON 321. 37 

8902 Wisharl Rd 

Richmond. VA 23229 
NORMAN. JOHN JOSEPH JR 237 

3204 Mountain Rd 

Haymarkct. VA 22069 
NORTH CAROLINA FELLOWS 84 
NORTH CAROLINA PIRC 98 
NORTHCOTT. ELEANOR J ISO. 189 
NORTHCOTT. NANCY 82 
NORTHRUP. CURTIS WHITNEY 227. 285 

16 Maryland Rd 

Maplcwood. NJ 07040 
NORTHRUP. JAMES IRVIN .50. 2.59 

PO Box 1066 

Davidson. NC 28036 
NORWOOD. CHRISTOPHER R .'90.259 

457 Pine Tree Dr 

Orange, CT 06477 
NORWOOD. JONATHAN HAYES .56 

457 Pine Tree Dr 

Orange, CT 06477 
NOTO. LAURIE MARIE 24S. 96 

54 Macon Ave 

Asheville. NC 28801 
NOTTINGHAM. MARK ALAN /.'6. 127. 236. 

233 

9412 Talisman Dr 

Vienna. VA 22180 
NUNN. CARIE K 110. //(. 251. 37. 259 

1 15 South East Ave 

Kannapolis. NC 28081 
NUTT. WILLIAM RODGER .'/.' 



o 



OBRIANT. JENNIFER lYNNE 6.5. .'26. 236. 

273 

198 Dcaring St 

Athens. CA 30605 
ODELL. JOHN BROWNING .56. 7J. 24S 

108 Villa Rd 

Newport News. VA 23601 
ODOM. DIANE KAY 23. 68. 176. 177. 60. 259. 

S4. 3 74 

5282 Vernon Lake Dr 

Dunwoody. CA 30338 
OKEL. THOMAS WESTCOTT 46. 236. 237 

147 Ml Vernon Dr 

Decatur. CA 30030 
OLDENBURG. MARK DOUGLAS 5.'. 24S. 7.5 

2337 Whilden Ct 

Charlotte. NC 28211 
OLDHAM. BENJAMIN TURNER 24S 

331 N Maysville St 
Mount Sterling. KY 40353 

OLDHAM. ROBYN M 181 
OLDS. DIETRICK MASON 24S 

184 Pondvicw Dr 

SpringHcld. MA 01118 
OLIVER. MARY MAY .1.'/ 

402 Springlakc Rd 

Columbia. SC 29206 
OLSON. LISA 3. lOS. 109, 320. 321. 37 

3323 Hilton Woods Dr 

Columbus. GA 31906 
OMICRON DELTA KAPP 60, 144 
OPPLNHIMER. WILLIAM M JR 

102 I ibbic Ave 

Richmond. VA 23226 
ORDINC. SANDRA LYNN .'.59 

332 Stratford Rd 
Wilkcsboro. NC 28697 

ORR. ERIN ELIZABETH .'J* 

7703 Glendalc Rd 

Chevy Chase. MD 20015 
ORTMAYER. LOUIS LOHMAN 159. .'/.'. 240 
OTTO SCOTT ROBERT 56. 6S. 90. 236. 60. 

232. 374 

2820 Cravey Dr 

Allanla. GA 30345 
OUTINt CLUB 98 
OUTTEN. SAMUEL WRIGHT 45 

10 Sevier St 

Greenville. SC 29605 
OVERBEY. WARREN M 39. 235. 259 

1532 Agawela Ave 

Knoxville. TN 37919 



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OVERBY. LEROV MARVIN 65. 70. 82. S3. 

150. 151. 248 

PO Box 5134 

Falmoulh. VA 22401 
OVERCASH. GINA ROCHELLE 224. 236 

209 West I9lh Si 

Kannapolis. NC 28082 
OWEN. ANNE KIRBY 106. 107. 138. 144. 

322. 323. 37. 100 

208 Howard Si 

Ashland. VA 23005 



PACKARD. ALICE JEAN 49. 124. I2f. 248. 
7i 

400 Moore Hcigtils 
Dubuque. lA 52001 
PAFFORD. THOMAS DAVID 92. 248 
411 Lower Terrace 
Hinlinglon. WV 25705 
PAGE. BARRY RICHARD JR \50. 151. 248 
1004 SunscI Dr 
Greensboro, NC 27408 
PALASAK. JOSEPH JOHN 49. 56. 115 
4246 Cardinal Blvd 
Daylona Beach. PL 32019 
PALMER. EDWARD L 94. 215 
PALMER. FRANCES E 64. 65. 68. 160. 226. 
236. 261 
610 Brandon Si 
Slalesville. NC 28677 
PANNIER. SUSAN D 248 
8130 Briar Creek Dr 
Annadalc. VA 22003 
PARENTS' WEEKEND 172 
PARK. LELAND M 192 
PARKER. EDITH ANN 36. 37. 259 
Rl, 1 Box 9A 
Clinlon. NC 28328 
PARKER. MARIE ANN 15. 66. 70. 71. 80. 83. 
144, 40. 147. 259 
1427 Raeford Rd 
Fayellevillc, NC 28305 
PARKER. VINCENT TERRANCE ■J6 
1140 45lh Place SE 
Washingcon. DC 20019 
PARTAIN.GIA MICHELE 12. 259 
641 Carriage Way NW 
Allanla. GA 30327 
PARTAIN. MALCOLM O 215 
PATTEN. ROBERT CHESTER 39 
Rl 1 Box 531 
Troulnlle. VA 24175 
PATTERSON. EARNEST F 214 
PATTERSON, WILLIAM B Je. .'49 
Nonh Carolina Ave 
Sewanee. TN 37375 
PAX 38 

PAYMER. WAYNE DAVID 46, 115. 259 
3780 NW 78lh Ln. 
Coral Springs. FL 33065 
PEACE. LYNN ELLEN 95. 322 
5432 Conlina Ave, 
Jacksonville. FL 32211 
PEACOCK. MELISSA S 94. 110. III. 18. 259 
4806 Si. Francis Ave 
Columbus. CA 31904 
PEARCE. MARGOT .'/.'. 236 
171 Bryn Mawr Dr 
Uke Worlh, FL 33460 
PEDERSEN, SVEND E 115. 132, 133 
l524Tullle Ave 
Wallingford, CT 06492 
PEEBLES, JOHN THOMPSON 62 
Rl 2 Box 46 
Uwrcnccville. VA 23868 
PEEBLES. RAY STOKES 30. 32. 33. 34. 83. 
259. 96 
Rl. 4 

Concord. TN 37720 
PEEK. RICHARD MAURICE JR 17. 232 
1621 Billmore Dr 
Charloue. NC 28207 
PELLARIN. DANIEL J JR 290 
375 Mimosa Circle 
Aiken. SC 29801 
PENDERGRAFT. HATTIE 192 
PENNANCE. PHILIP F 214 
PEOPLE, THE 174 
PEP BAND 76 

PER-LEE. JONATHAN PHILIP 249. 75. 40 
1522 Mason Mill Rd NE 
Allanla, GA 30329 
PERKINS, EDWARD BRADLEY .'6, ///, 236 
6605 Burlinglon Rd 
Whilsell, NC 27377 
PERRY, LAURA ELLEN 249 
2400 Oakengale Ln 
Midlolhian, VA 23113 
PETERS, DEBORAH SUE 259 
Rl 2 Box 354A 
Morehead City. NC 28557 
PETREA, KATHY LYNN 249. SO 
P.O. Box 555 
Kannapolis, NC 28081 
PETROU. JOHN NICHOLAS 126, 127 
525 Deepwood Dr 
Henderson, NC 27536 



PETROU, LAURA 249. 37 
525 Deepwood Dr 
Henderson, NC 27536 
PEZZULLO, CARLA MARY 36, 37 
1301 1 Mayhill Cl 
Fairfax, VA 22030 
PFEFFERKORN, KARL J 
2100 Royall Dr 
Winslon Salem, NC 27106 
PHARR, WALTER DAVIDSON 28, 54. 55, 
145, 322. 50. 147 
3630 Pinelop Rd 
Greensboro, NC 27410 
PHI DELTA THETA 46 
PHI GAMMA DELTA 56 
PHILANTHROPIC SOCIETY 82 
PHILLIPS, LUCY EUGENIA 49. 94. 160 226. 
259 

2243 Sagamore Hills Dr 
Decalur, GA 30033 
PHILLIPS, MARK BRYAN 259. 96 
4901 Spring Ln 
Charloue, NC 28213 
PHIPPS, ANNA CATHERINE 145, 322. 40 
Lincoln Ave 
Elkins, WV 26241 
PHYSICAL EDUCATION PROGRAM 22 
PI KAPPA ALPHA 52 

PIDGEON, JULIA TAYLOR 80 81, 144, 322. 
323. 60. 40 
4648 Hemlock Ln 
Memphis, TN 381 17 
PIERCE, DIANA PATRICIA 58. 62. 322. 74. 
84 

2824 SW 14lh Dr. 
Gainesville, FL 32608 
PIERCY, GIFFORD LIONEL 6, 87, 114, 115 
130. 131, 159, 188. 259 
Rl 1 Box 69 
Union Level, VA 23973 
PINKERTON, THOMAS O 215 
PIPE SOCIETY 96 
PITTARD, RUTH W 181 
PITTMAN, WILLIAM R 214 
PLOTT, DONALD B 215. 74, 147 
PLOWDEN, JEANNE L 322. 323 
624 Mallison Ave 
Sumlcr, SC 29150 
P,0. TREK 116 

POE, DAVID PHILLIP 26, 52. 325. 147 
9701 Galsworlh Cl 
Fairfax. VA 22030 
POLLARD. JAMES HALLER 54. 65. 235. 236 
2586 Summil Hills Ln, 
Tucker. GA 30084 
POLLEY, MAX E 215 
POOL. ROBERT ALLEN 115. 236. 237 
PO Box 1135 
Cullowhcc. NC 28723 
POPE. PATRICK ALDON 46. 114. 295 324. 
325 

738 Ashboro Si 
Fayelleville. NC 28301 
PORTER. JOHN MAURICE 102. 103. 144. 
145. 60 
Lawrence Ave 
Wesl Coxsackic. NY 12192 
POSEY. LYNMARIE A 224. 236 
944 Wayne Ave 
Wyomissing. PA 19610 
POTTENGER. SUSAN PLATT 249 
38 Rushc Dr 
Cohassel. MA 02025 
POTTER. ALBERT J JR 54. 249. 50 
1006 Shamrock Rd 
Asheboro. NC 27203 
POTTSDAMER. VINITA D 224. 236 
784 Lynhursl Dr SW 
Allanla. GA 30311 
POWELL. JULIE SUZANNE 224. 236 
8713 Kenilworlh Dr 
Raleigh, NC 27612 
POWELL, LYNN ALISON 224. 236 
2816 Fair Oaks Rd 
Decalur, GA 30033 
POWELL, ROGER E 145. 215 
POWERS, SCOTT CONNER 115. 236 
4411 Clyne 

Fayelleville, NC 28301 
PRSIDENT^ OFFICE 176 
PRESSLEY, KEVIN RAY 54. 55, ,58, 144, 325 
75 

2 Sherwood Ln 
Canlon, NC 28716 
PRETTYMAN, DAVID THOMAS 49. 56. 6J, 
6 5. 190. 325 
R F D 1 Box 84 
Prcslon. MD 21655 
PRETTYMAN. SUSAN BETH 223. 236 
10825 Visla Rd. 
Columbia, MD 21044 
PRICE, CHARLES W 122. 123. 259 
1127 Slilford Ave. 
PlainField, NJ 07060 
PRICE, WILLIAM D 46, 87. 115. 159 
1-067 5 Windslream 
Columbia, MD 21044 
PRINE, BARRY CARLTON 160. 249 
2027 Morgenlhau Dr 
Mobile, AL 36618 



PROCTOR, EDWARD KNOX 

1211 Pinkncy 

Whileville, NC 28472 
PROCTOR, J HARRIS JR 217 
PROFFIT, DAVID STEPHEN 34. 259 

1008 Billmorc Ave 

Lynchburg, VA 24502 
PSVCHOLOCV CLUB 94 
PURCELL, WILLIAM R 11 144. 236. 61. 4.< 

1301 Dunbar Dr 

Laurinburg. NC 28352 
PUTNAM. JEREMIAH L 17, 95, 144, 217 



QUIPS AND CRANKS 68 



RADAR, FRANK 247 

RADER, I.INDSEY ANN 223. 236 

1613 Elon Way 

Croflon, MD 21 I 14 
RAIN. RAIN GO AWAY 170 
RAMSEY, FLORA 181 
RANSOM, DONYA JAYNE 260. 40 

326 Exeler Rd 

Devon. PA 19333 
RANSOM. EARL STACY JR 286 

PO Box 308 

Pembroke. NC 28372 
RATCHFORD. JOSEPH T JR 127. 227. 234 

8804 Fircresl 



Ale: 



2308 



RATLIFF, CHARLES E JR 2/6,195 
RATTERREE, JASPER C 165 
624 Genlry Place 
Charloue, NC 28210 
RAY. JEFFREY SCOTT 62. 63. 103. 45 
99 Whucslone Ln 
Rocheslcr. NY 14618 
RAY. PAUL CHASTAIN 122. 249 
2154 Greensward Dr 
Allanla. GA 30345 
REARDON. STEPHEN WILTON 229. 236 
3312 Shaflsbury Si 
Durham. NC 27704 
REASONER. CHRISTOPHER 
3000 Eslero Blvd 
Fl Myers Beach. FL 33931 
REDD. JANE ALYSON 226. _'J7 247 
1900 Nicholasvillc Rd 
Lexington. KY 40503 
REDDING. JOAN LUCILE 144. 260. 275 
708 W Church Si 
Eli7abelh Cily, NC 27909 
REDDING. SCOTT JOHN 103. 227. 237 
212 Ridgecrcsl Rd 
Asheboro. NC 27203 
REED. PHOEBE CURLIN 20 226. 237 
3419 Ridgewood Rd 
Allanla. GA 30327 
REED. STANLEY B JR 260 
Rl 2 Box 134A 
Purcellvillc. VA 22132 
REES. JOHN B 111 29. 110. ;//. 260 40 
295 Tanglewood Dr 
Alhens. GA 30606 
REESE. JAMES DUEY 39. 68. 91. 249 
PO Box 502 
Bainbridgc. GA 31717 
REGISTRAR'S OFFICE 188 
REICH. JAMES DAVID JR 145. 325 
1 103 Woodland Ave 
Monroe. NC 281 10 
REINTSEMA. ERIC PAUL 
614 N Broadway 
Saratoga Springs. NY 12866 
REVIEW BOARD 60 
REW. PAMELA SCOTT 49. 249 
208 Boulevard 
Mountain Lakes. NJ 07046 
RHODES. DANIEL D 15. 163. 2/6. 342 
RHODES. DAVID FRANKLIN 39. 145. 183. 
325 

2187 Spring Creek Rd 
Decalur. GA 30033 
RHOTON. WILSON P 111 45 
512 Dutchman Ave 
Mount Holly. NC 28120 
RIBADENEYRA. ELIZABETH T 49. 68. 249 
1164 Wyndegate Dr 
Orange Park. FL 32073 
RICE. CRAIG HOPKINS 118. 119. 40 
1010 Lane Ave 
Tilusville. FL 32780 
RICE. JORGIA CELESTE 223. 75 
1599 Tryon Rd 
Allanla, GA 30319 
RICE, MOLLY DICKERSON 260 
10644 Rondo Ave 
Baton Rouge. LA 70815 
RICH. CATHERINE GRACE /60. 226. 229 
236 
Box 83 

Emory. VA 24327 
RICHARDS. JOHN M 49. 25 
94 Dunkirk Rd 



Ballimore, MD 21212 
RICHARDS, RICHARD EVANS 2J7 
Rl I Box 1684 
Davidson, NC 28036 
RIDDLE, KFITH EDWARD 124. 125. 260 
304 North Lake Ave 
Lccsburg, FL 32748 
RIDER, WENDY ANNE 260 
352 Bayberric Dr 
Stamford, CT 06902 
RIFLE TEAM 118 
RlOPFl , DAVID JAMES 48. 49. .56 
Rl 1 Box 24 
EarlysviUc, VA 22936 
RIST, CARL FREDERICK 2.?7 
18014 SW 8lh Ct 
Miami, FL 33157 
RITCHIE, TIMOTHY SCOTT J.5, ///, 130. 
249. 251 
2914 Avon Rd 
Louisville, KY 40220 
ROARK, MARY D 
131 1 Woodland Ave 
Johnson Cily, TN 37601 
ROBBINS, JOHN WILLIAM JR 83. 249. 40 
2713 Amherst Rd 
Rocky Mount. NC 27801 
ROBERTS. CHRISTOPHER T 122. 123. 236 
1466 Myron St 
Schenectady. NY 12309 
ROBERTS. DAVID K 111 66. 67 9.5. J26. J27. 
50 

3030 SW 70th Ln 
Gainesville. FL 32601 
ROBERTS. JOSEPH EARL JR 249 
Rl 1 Box 457A 
Pembroke. NC 28372 
ROBERTS. MARY S .10 260 
9 Greyslonc Rd 
Ashevillc. NC 28804 
ROBERTS. PAUL C 229. 237 
9 Greyslonc Rd 
Ashevillc. NC 28804 
ROBERTS. SUSAN KAY 112 
ROBERTSON. HUGH B 260 
613 Wesl Union Si 
Morganlon. NC 28655 
ROBERTSON. JOHN H 52 
234 Rivcrcdge Dr 
Lcola. PA 17540 
ROBERTSON. LINDSAY C 5. 62. 83. 137. 

326. 327. 84 
• 2304 Lackawanna St 
Adclphi, MD 20783 
ROBINSON, BRYAN DAVID 
613 Piedmont 
Tallahassee, FL 32312 
ROBINSON, CHARLES W 111 .54. ;6.5 
142 Kennedy 
San Antonio. TX 78209 
ROBINSON. DANIEL CLAY 46. 122. 123 
Rt I 

Lcganon, NJ 08833 
ROBINSON, DORIS AMES 108. 326. 37 
1825 St Julian Place 
Columbia. SC 29201 
ROBINSON. ELIZABETH R 68. 249. 37 
3301 Stanwyck Ct 
Charlotte. NC 28211 
ROBINSON. GABRIELLA M 87. 224. 237 
15 Ghana Dr 
Greenville. SC 29605 
ROBINSON. JOYCE HENRI 137. 141. 249. 
75. 36. 37 

349 Putnam Ranch Rd 
Wesl Palm Beach. FL 33405 
ROBINSON. LFisTER DANIEL 42 
Rt 1 Box 61 F 
Mooresville. NC 28115 
ROBINSON. SHERRY E 249. 40 
230 Royal Tower Dr 
Irmo. SC 29063 
ROBINSON. WILLIAM A 22. 94. 326. 45 
Rl 1 Box 2600 
Edislo Beach. SC 29438 
ROBINSON. WILLIAM R HI 249 
4242 Gardenspring Dr 
Clemmons. NC 27012 
ROCHE. CAROL LEIGH 69. 249 
1706 Greystone Rd 
Dublin. GA 31021 
ROCK. ANDREW PETER 46. 115. 186. 227 
1209 Roxboro Rd 
Longwood. FL 32750 
ROGERS. MALCOLM M 249 
P O Box 767 
Easley. SC 29640 
ROGERS. MARVIN L 260 
109 Mountain View Dr 
Easley. SC 29640 
ROCERSON. THOMAS A 2/7 
ROCICH. LYNNE MARGOT 237 
8024 Washington Rd 
Alexandria. VA 22308 
ROLLER. E GARDNER 181 
ROLLINS. AARON B 29. 87. 115. 260 
Rl 10 Box 46 
Gainesville. FL 32601 
ROLLINS, ANNE BRADLEY 222. 237 
5 Goodale Circle 



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S((l!l ASDIKSIISHI II IK 'ft '>ft 

17114 MiII.,.kI III 

Mimln >it M iftliD. 

Mill ! ( \R(II ISI M\M R 'Jt 

677 ( ,d>llk Rd 

( l<.illi>lu S( .'ll'll' 
MOII ( \R(>I ^ S I I l/\HI III It '0 .'. 



Il»t |M H.» ."I 

llio.ill IS 17 14 1 
S(()TI IMISM D Rl( ll\RD IK 

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:il<<7 ( kill.in.u.f.i Rd 

RikIl\ I.kc (i\ 10740 
SI II ( HRISTISI MARII .'.'4. .'17 

M: Diinr.i>cn Di 

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SI I I Mil M\M PMRIC k <.'. .'4« 

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Mmlcr P.irk. I 1 1:71: 
SI I I I RS RASIKJI Pll P 14. .'.'7. .'.<6. .'ft(. 

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lkndir-.in>illc. SC 2H7\V 
SKSIOR.S :70 141 
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D.ividN.>n. SC :xol6 
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(l«IK.Vill( I I i:m)« 
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MIJ6I.I I. A Hiu: 
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IIM I lm»uuil Iconic 

(i.«i..b.i>i. N( :740i 
SMI I BY SII VI S lATI .'.'7, .'»/. }J) 

71116 Pj.iiKkcll Rd 

( lijtI.Hic S( :>.'ln 
SIIIRIIIYS PAIRKk) Iiyl9i. 3iM. 4.1 

< I I J.ihiiMin PU>c 

Mjyn.ili.. SI IIIUM'I 
SHI RKII I IXIROTIIY I) IW 
SHI IIAVID I 'v :ih It 
Sllll I I) SII PHI S MVArt /» «.• .'J» 

10lc.,U-.6lft 

Sti>|viii Sc«. VA :16<I6 

siiiRin lAMis MIT( III 1 1 4». ;m. !.•» 

I47IK CrjiHikc Si 

(cnifc.iik. VA ;:n;o 

SIIOI M\kl R DAVIIJ 4». 4». f». .'JV 

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440 (;rccnbriji. I i> 

(hjtiolon.. S< :<(4i: 
SHORT MIT/I 117 lo:. lot. 107. III. .'<o. JO 

III4I Bitdcn Kd 

( oliimbuv OH 4i:o^ 
SHRIM . Mil I lAVI I JR .'.'». .V 7 

105 Auburn Dr 

Alcljndcr Cil). Al 15010 
SHY. I ISI II I^VI .'6/ 

704 Shjdv I j»n Rd 

( bjpcl Hill S( :7»|4 
SI(,MA ALPHA IPSIl.ON 44 

si(;ma phi rpsiios u 

SII \i IRA )OR(.i 1 1 IS :6. IJ. j:ii. 147 

PO B.I. 141 

lljmpdcn Sidncv VA :j»41 
SII Vt R JOlis ROBHRT .'17. .'.L' 
*'»:4 Marlin I jkc Rd 

( lurkiiit. s( :«:i: 

SIMAS. JOIIS C ARI ft< 144 .'ft/ 
41 i: BridgcoiHid I n 



Add experience 
to your degree. 




Local Advcrliiemrf)! 

Fact.-; iiuiiiatc that ymi may work in 
tliicc to five (litfi'ivnt (.aiviTs. It won't l>e 
umi.-<ual to make- i-lian^ri's a.s you k<>- And 
It's I'litiii'ly po.ssilili' that your final career 
(Iocs not i"\en t'xist today. 

Often in a fiist job, you are an 
assistant to the assistant, '^'our 
i('S))()nsihiHty is limited to a desk and 
typcw ritei'. 

Hut when your fiist joli is an Army 
I'LT, you'll have real management 
experience. You'll he in chary-e. On a 
specific job assignment, you cotdd have 'M) 
to 40 people workinj; for you. And you could 
he resi)()nsihle foi- millions of dollars in 
equipment. 

Responsibility for people and 
resources is exactly the kind of "take 
charge" experience civilian employers 
.seek. It's a margin of difference in the 
increasiuKly competitive job mai'ket. 

I'lepare to rise to the top in your 
field. Make your first job 3 or 4 years as an 
Army Officer. 

If vou have two years reniaininp in 
school, you can bepnn ROTC this summer. 
You'll be compensated financially; 
stimulated physically and mentally. 

To add experience to your depree 
contact Davidson College ROTC Department 
Davidson College. 



Army ROTC. Learn what it takes to lead. 



ADVERTISEMENTS 367 



Charlollc, NC 28211 
SIMMONS. LESLIE DALE II 116. 111. 45 

2 Lincoln Way 

Buckhannan.WV 26201 
SIMON. NELSON HUGO *, 137. 32S. 329 

1 1044 Powder Horn Dr 

Polomac, MD 20854 
SIMPSON. ARNOLD GLENN 3-1. 76. 331 

PO Bo« 919 

WilkcNboro. NC 28697 
SIMPSON. DAVID ANDREW 39. HO 

271 Burragc Rd 

Concord. NC 28025 
SIMPSON. JOSEPH B IV 26. 43. 2S0 

22JO Wcslminslcr Pbc-c 

Charlollc. NC 28207 
SIMS. GARY ALLEN JR J6. Ilf. 261 

82 Donna Dale Ave. 

Concord. NC 28025 
SINCLAIR. CHARLES VM 78. 144. 146 

647 Car> Dr 

Auburn. AL 36830 
SINCLAIR. RAY CHARLES »7. /;.<. 131. 261 

1367 Milnor Si 

Jacksonville. FL 32206 
SINGER. WILLIAM RIPLEY f6. 49. 290 

Bon 95 

Lumpkin. GA 31815 
SINGERMAN. ALAN J 159. 2IS 
SINGLETON. JOHN ROBINSON 38. 39. 93 

128 Eudora Si 

Denver. CO 80220 
SINGLETON. LAURA GAIE .'.<0 

225 Lebanon Ave 

Morganlown. WV 26505 
SISCO. LANCE THAYER 40. //.< J30. 131. 

261. 283 

15715 Almondwood Dr 

Tampa. EL 3361 2 
SITTON. JLLIA LEIGH 20. 224 

727 W Union Si 

Morganlon. NC 28655 
SKELTON. STEPHEN WILLIAM 237. 233 

7310 Filberl Ln 

Tampa. EL 33617 
SLADCIK. GARY FRANK 23S 

702 Palm Dr 

Glenwood. IL 60425 
SLAGLE. CHARLES D 102 103. 122. 123 
SLATER. GRACIA W 182 
SLATER. JOHN W 195 
SLOAN. DAVID BRYAN 111 .54. 235 

1925 Hillsboro Rd 

Wilmmglon. NC 28403 
SLOAN. LISA ANN 6S. SO. 261 

4632 Hoylake Dr 

Virginia Beach. VA 23462 
SLOOP. GREGORY TODD 227. 237 

612 N Poplar Ave 

Kannapohs. NC 28081 
SLOOP. JOSEPH CONRAD ///. 135. 250 

Rl 1 Bo< 418 

Kannapoliv. NC 28082 
SMART. WILLIAM GREGORY 54. 55. S3. 

261. 331. 50 

101 Camden Dr 

Sparlanburg. ,SC 29302 
SMILEY. ELIZABETH BAKER 224. 292 

3728 Cloudland Dr 

Allanla. GA 30327 
SMITH. ALEXANDER PARKER 250 

606 Brookwood Ln 

Goldsboro. NC 27530 
SMITH. ANTHONY WILLIAM 77. 125. 262. 

2914 Brookmerc 

Charlollcsville. VA 22901 
SMITH. CATHERINE M /.'«. 129. 250 

nii Spencer Si 

Durham. NC 27705 
SMITH. COLIN SHAW 70. 71. 144. 186 
SMITH. DWICHT LLOYD 26.' 

4606 Emmocyn Dr 

Summcrneld. NC 28208 
SMITH. EDWIN AGAN 4.5 

PO 8o« 10 

Stalcsboro. GA 30458 
SMITH. ELIZABETH JAYNE 72. 161. 226. 

237. 232 

2917 Henneberry Rd 

Pompey. NY 13138 
SMITH. EMILY FOLLIN 331. 37 

103 Elholl Si 

Bre*lon. AL 36426 
SMITH. JOHN BREM ;;/. 250 

421 Fieldslone R<; 

Moorevvillc. NC 28115 
SMITH. MICHAEL JOSEPH 27. 46. 235. 285 

1610 Dale Circle S 

Dunedin. FL 33528 
SMITH. MICHAEL LYNN //. 46. 103. 115. 

237 

1416 Audena Ln 

Knoxvillc. TN 37919 
SMITH. NORWOOD MARVE J4. 248. 250 

1804 Cickasa* Dr 

Columbu.v. MS .19701 
SMITH. SCOTT GORDON 132 133. 262. 101 

1600 Crcsceni Ridgc 

Daylona Beach. FL 32018 



SMITH. SUZANN HELEN 224. 237 

Rl 1 Box 360D 

Willow Springs. NC 27592 
SMITH. THERESA ELLEN 43. 331 

1045 Englcwood Dr 

Winslon Salem. NC 27106 
SMITH. WILLIAM T 331 

512 Old Mount Holly Rd 

Slanlc). NC 28164 
SMITH. WINIFRED STOKES 331. 36 

P O Box 6 

Clover. SC 29710 
SNEAD. PARKS HOLMAN 111 J9. 66. 67. 

-'62. 310. 84 

Rl 2 Box 23 

Amhersl. VA 24521 
SNIPES. RL'SSELL G JR 39. 68. 250 

600 Holland Rd 

Fuquj* Vjrina. NC 27526 
SOCCER TEAM 122 
SODERSTROM. CHERYL JEAN 224. JJ7 

Slony Brook School 

Slony Brook. NY 11790 
SOFLEY. CARL WILSON JR 144. 262. 40 

1237 Kingston Ridge Rd 

Cary. NC 27511 
SOMMERS. SAMUEL A 111 250 

Rl 5 Box 115 

Selma. AL 36701 
SONDOV. NEIL STUART 284 

436 Ransdcll Dr 

Sparlanburg, SC 29302 
SOPER. LAUREN CLAIRE 250 

5.501 Sullon Place 

New Orleans. LA 70114 
SOPHOMORES 238-251 
SORACCO. JEAN LESLIE ;64. 222. 262 

2160 Highpoinl Trail SW 

Allama. GA 30331 
SORENSEN. KEVIN ERIC 

201 Camclford Rd 

McMurrav. PA 15317 
SOUD. STEPHEN EUGENE 65. 235 

840 Randolph Dr 

Aberdeen. MD 21001 
SPANGLER. JOHN GIVEN 39. 79. 144. 222. 

236. 262. 233 

381 1 Henderson Rd 

Greensboro. NC 27410 
SPANISH CLUB 92 
SPANNUTH. HOLLY ANN 223. 74 

27 Waverly 

Clarendon Hills. IL 60514 
SPAUGH. ROBERT GORDON 58. 228. 237 

1015 Wellinglon Rd 

Winslon Salem. NC 27106 
SPEAKERS 156 
SPECHT. ALVIN THOMAS JR 

19 HavenRd 

W'ellesley. MA 02181 
SPENCER. GEOFFREY DAVID .54. 262. 297. 

50 

206 Wild Turkey Trail 

Chapel Hill. NC 27514 
SPENCER. JENNIFER ANN 222. 237. 297 

206 Wild Turkey Trail 

Chapel Hill. NC 27514 
SPENCER. SAMUEL R JR 144. 155. 176. 

177. 178. 279. 148. 195 
SPRING FROLICS 142 
STACKHOUSE. LEE ANN 224. 228. 262. 40 

1000 W'eslwood Ave. 

High Poinl. NC 27262 
STAFFORD. SHAWN DELANEY 115. 250. 45 

601 E Carolina Ave 
Crewe. VA 23930 

STAHMANN. JULIA 262 

7 Devon Si 

Toowoomga. Old Australia 
STANBACK. ANNE ELIZABETH 86. 128. 

129. 144. 332. 333. 147 

626 Club House Dr 

Salisbury. NC 28144 
STANBACK. JOHN WILLIAM 52, 121. 250 

636 Club House Dr 

Salisbury. NC 28144 
STANBACK. MARK THOMAS 235. 237 

626 Club House Dr 

Salisbury. NC 28144 
STARNF.S. ANDREW EVANS 332 333 

1 Highlander Rd 

Woodland Hills 

Asheville. NC 28804 
STARNES. WILLIAM BARRY 

528 King Edward Rd 

Charlollc. NC 28211 
STEELE. ROBERT PERRY 95 

PO Box 3485 FSS 

Radford. VA 24141 
STEEL. LANCE K 2/9 
STERGHOS. STRATTON N JR 46. 250 

1775 SE 9lh St 

Ft Lauderdale. FL 33316 
STEVENS. AGNES CORINNE 262 

Rt 3 Box 607 

Dudley. NC 28333 
STEVENSON. CHARLES J 

743 Springdale Rd E 

SlatcsviUc. NC 28677 
STEVENSON. KATHLEEN 181 




Hallmark Cartds. 

Whitman Candies, 

Gifts, Toys 

Health & Beauty Aids 



SADLER SQUARE 

DAVIDSON. NC 
892-7211 



PAPA'S PIZZA PARLOR 




Davidson College Students- 

10% off with student ID 

on Mondays and Wednesdays. 



Mooresville, NC 
663 3917 



Laxtm 



MpQf«l>: A4v^l*W<l 




General Contractors: 
Mary Irwin Belk Dormitory And Peter S. Knox Dormitory 



m 



Laxton Construction Company, Inc. General Contractors • 3641 Central Ave. • P.O. Box 18000 • Charlotte. MC 28218 • 

Phone: (704) 537 2141 



ADVERTISEMENTS 369 



STIl Nfkl R. JOHN IIX;aR II -V.'. .MJ 

4(>.m Mcrwm 

HouMun. TX 77027 
STINE. STKPHt N f -<-. -'«) 

1711) Chnslmjs Dr 

MotriMoun. TN 37SI4 
STIPP. JOHN JOSEPH .<-'. /-'(. -'>'0 

4301 Carmi;! Rd 

tharlollc. NC 2s:il 
STOCKTON. JAMF.S HILL U. J6J 

2K44 lairmum Rd 

WinMon S-ilcin. VC 27106 
STOkLS. K\TMRVN ARMLCIA JSO 

3(.2I Pmclop Rd 

(itconsboro. Nt 27410 
STOKhlS. SAMUEL LANCE in 2S0 

3200 Country Club Dr 

Charlollc. NC 28205 
STONE. JOHNNY MM .>». .'9. 2S0 

Rl i Box 284 

Siinford. NC 27330 
.STOREY. JOHN PARKER WH. 2>0. 50 

PO Bo< 7<)6 

Bjrlo». II 33830 
STORM. BRETT LEE 116. 117. .!.>.'. 3}3 

1117 N Norlh Lake Dr, 

Hollv»ood. KL 33019 
STOSLR. DAVID ALLEN If. f2. III. L<0. 

131. 2.-'0 

10457 Dorchcslcr Ave 

WcMchcMcr. IL 60153 
STOTLER. ELLIOTT C .U. 3f. 90. 262. 263 

3.19 Tincbridgc 

HouMon. TX 77024 
STOLDT. NANCY LYNN 131. 2S0 

2705 Ha^cUood 

Eon Wavnc. IN 46805 
STRADER. RICHARD HAYNFS 31 

208 Ovcrbrook Dr 

IcxmfU.n. NC 27292 
STR\»S1 R. TERESA II E .19. 2.50 



TANKERSIEY. THOMAS C .'.'.<. .'" 

2231 Woodlc> Rd 

Monlgomcry. AL 361 1 1 
TAPP. RIC HARD LINDSAY .V. .'!' 

Rl 1 Box 93 

EHand. NC 27243 
TATE. ROBERT CiREYI JR ''■. -'" 

3500 River Bend Rd 

Birminfham. AL 35243 
TAYLOR. BIRT lOWl I R 111 

3955 S Pinebro.ik Dr 

Mobile. AL 36608 
TAYLOR. DAVID AITCHESON 2.V 

4001 Belle Rive Terrace 

Alexandria. VA 22309 
TAYLOR. RALPH LELAND <4. 236. 2o2. 

233. fl 

2730 Duke ClouceMcr 

EaM Point. (iA 30344 
TAYLOR. VICTOR (i JR II. 126. 127. 2fi 

4f 

Bradlev Creek Point 

Wilmington. NC 28403 
TEACiUE. JOHN B 1.1 49. .56. 2211. 262. 23 

1651 Spring Dr. 

Louisville. KY 40205 
TEER. DAVID All EN 111.233 

3440 Rugby Rd 

Durham. NC 27707 
TEER. ROBERT (il ENN /;/. 2.5/ 

3440 Rugby Rd 

Durham. NC 27707 
TENNIS TEAM 



Rl 



STRICKLAND. (,l ORGI T III 236. 237 

5610 Old C hester Rd 

Bethcsda. MD 2tmi4 
STRIN(. ENSEMBLE ^6 
STRlM.l R 11 \R01 D J JR 262 

H4I VlcM.in Dr 

Dctjlur. (. \ 3UU32 
.STROl D. C YNTHIA LEE 262 

Pine Rd 

Davidson. NC 28036 
STROLD. J B 111 (6;. /.«/. 2IS 
STROL D. WILLIAM RANDALL 90. 23.^. 237 

10517 Beinhorn 

Houston. TX 77024 
STROUD. WILLIAM R JR 2.16.237 

415 Drummond Dr 

Raleigh. NC 27609 
STl ART SCHOLARS 84 
STL \RT. S\M1 II P JR 119. 332. 33.1. JO 

1012 Kendale Dr 



Wii 



NC 



STl DENT <.0\ ERNMENT sx 

STl DENT IIEf I" 

STl DENT STORE ISX 

SU KIS t,ORlK)N 52. 2fO 

11125 W,K)dsionc Dr 

1 lorentc. SC 29501 
STUTTS. SLSAN GRACE 224. 237 

Rt 1 Bo> 450 

Hickory. NC 28601 
SULLIVAN. GARRETT A JR 6.t. 1 1 1 . 2.s'0 

5526 Eivc Knolls Dr 



Ma 



NC 



810S 



Bristol. II i:i:i 

SUMMERS. SI /ll :•! 
SUMMI > , S\l 1 11 t,R Ml \M 

317 Pkavinl St 

Spindale. NC 2«lt.tl 
SLTTON. c Mill RINI 171.219 
SI TTON. HOMBLR B 219 
SWl ARI Nt.lN. DENNIS ROY 237. 33 

Hr Carolin.i \sc 

Siatesullc. N( 28617 
SUIMMIM, TE*M 124 
SWINDM I . CHARI IS PI RRY ll> 

Rt 2 Bo< 22 

Ashsille. M 1^9Sl 
S«ISHI R J \MI S <. 2(.v 
S»OI I ORD. CHRISTOPHER 1 Jl. .'6 

2114 Buthan St 

Norlh W ilkcsboro. NC 28659 



TABB. MARY WEI DON , 
.\4 

3042 Pine Needle Rd 
Augusta. (iA loooo 

I VBB. STl » ;o' 



, 126 



128 



TERRY. CONSTANCE C 

102 Maloaka Rd 

Richmond. VA 23226 
TERRY. JAMES RICHARD 122. 144. 332. 

3.1.1. IX 

933 Seville Dr 

Clarkston. OA 30021 
TERRY. LAURA HAMPTON 2.s0 

102 Matoaka Rd 

Richmond. VA 23226 
TERRY. WII IIAM H 144. 173. 178. 179. 2: 

279. 316. 320. 335. 61. /J7. 195 
THATCHER. ROBERT B .U. .132. 333 

419 N Bragg Ave 

Lookout Mountain. TN 373.50 
THIES. ERANK R 111 49. .^6. 57. H.t. 91. 26. 

Ill 

334 Hempstead Place 

Charlotte. NC 28207 
THOLEN. JAMES ALBERT .s. 49 .16. 57. I- 

33 f. 114 

7121 Thomas Branch Dr 

Bclhcsda. MD 20034 
THOMAS. ELIZABETH J 144. 26 1. 36. !' 

510 Oliver Cl 

Cincinnali. OH 45215 
THOMAS. LS II ^ NE B 192 
THOM\S, 1 JOB 219 
THOMAS. JON \T1IAN LEI 7< 

617 Jefferson Circle 

Liberty. MD 64068 
THOMAS. MARK CHRISMAN .s2. 3.14. 33: 

805 N River Rd 

Ne» Port Richey. EL 33552 
THOMAS. MARK P 261 

1803 (iriffith Rd 

Monroe. NC 281111 
THOMPSON. DONNA (,AI1 .'JJ. 217. 292 

Rl 1 Box 48 

Tobaccovillc. NC 27050 
THOMPSON. Gl ORCil S JR 26. 14. 217. 

232 

4007 Betsv In 

Houston. TX 77027 
THOMPSON. NANCY NANl lit). //(. 22 

237 

140 Boiling Spring Circle 

Southern Pines. NC 28387 
THOMP.SON. RIIITT Jl 1 I Rl Y U. 144 I. 

283. .1.1.'. 36 

3718 River Oaks In 

Birmingham. Al 35223 
THOMPSON. TRACY KA1HI I IN n.s 82 
121. 250. 251 

1616 Cavendish C I 

Charlotte. NC 28211 
THOMSON. JOHN ARC HI R i U. IK. J< 

3608 Duberry C t 

Atlanta. (iA 10319 
THOMSON. TODD STl ART IDS. 250 

11411 Purple Beech 

Reston. \ A 22091 
TilORNBI RR'* . MARY C 168. 2/.v 
THORNSBI RRN. ROBERT M 46. Il< 

2690 MiI1».«kI ( t 



IXc 



, (iA 



THORNTON lot ANN 40. / i: 

311 16th Ave 

Ococe. LL 32761 
TIERNAN.C HKISTOPHI R 14. 

10 Brookside Dr 

(irccnxich. C T 06810 
Til Bl RY JI IIRI Y P 21- 

8327 Blossom Belle 



250 



Missouri Citv. TX 774.59 
TINKLER. STUART A. 95 3.14. 33.1. 40 

119 Partridge Rd 

Greenwood. SC 29646 
TINSLEY. El LIS ALLAN JR. .14. 91. 250 

2202 S Live Oak Parkway 

Wilmington. NC 28401 
TODD. Nl VINS W III .14. 126. /27. 144. 235 



619 Ridgc Rd 
Sahsburv. MD 21801 
TOI BERT. CARL ERNEST 115 I -W. 131. 
Rt 2 Box 824 



Lcn. 



NC 



TOLER. ELIZABETH LYNN J.I. 2.10 

812 Woodsdalc Rd 

Wilmington. DE 19809 
TORRENCI . HARR1 1 

206 Verde Vistc Dr 

Thousand Oaks. CA 91360 
TOSLOSKV. JOHN JOSEPH JR 237. 232 

3851 Abingdon Rd 

Charlotte. NC 28211 
TOLClll T. NEIL H 2IS 
TRACK TEAM 130 
TRAWlCk. JEEF DANIEL 2.14. 88 

Rt, 1 Box 378 

Bav Minctte. AL 36.'i07 
TRIBUS. CLIFFORD BOEHF 16. 105 250 45 

68 Stockcr Rd 

Essex fclK. NJ 11^1121 
TROBK 11, ROB! RT Kl V IN 49. 56. 263 

1 16211 KcKin \>c 
Philadelphia, PA 191 16 

TROTTER, lAMlS lORD 22S 

1243 Fast Catalpa 

Springfield. MO 65804 
TROLTMAN. JAMES I.ISLIE 56. 57. 144. 

2.14. 236. 26.1. .t.tJ. 7.S. 40 

Bridgcbord Rd 

Moorcstown, NJ 081157 
TRL MBL I I , I DW ARD R 43. 150. 151. 3.14. 

16 Montgomcrv Si 

Hamilton. NY 13.146 
TSANTES. NICHOLAS (i .'2. 240. 250 

2008 Wood Hollow Cove 

Virginia Beach. VA 234.'i4 
TULLY. KATHERINE E 6X. 26.1. 36. l" 

6240 Green Me.idows 

Memphis. TN 38138 
TULLY. MARK PRATT 229. 2.17 

109 Via Havre 

Newport Beach. CA 92663 
TUNKEl , RONDALD FRANCIS 250. J(l 

RED 8 Box 26A 

Hcndcrsonvillc, NC 287.19 
TLRK, \NNF Al 1 ISON 26.1 

2 Bcavcrbrook Rd 
Ashcullc. NC 288114 

TLRK ROBERT DVNll I 1 235 



TLRNBLI l.(,ORI)ON \ .14. 151. I SI. 250. 

75 

4519 Kirgsway Dr 

Mobile. AL 36608 
TURNER. DWIDCI IITON 56. 1 16. 117 

222K Wcllcslcv Ave 



t harlotlc, NC 28207 
TL RNFR 1)1 R \NI) JAMES 2.10 

Murrassillc. G\ lt)S64 
TURNER. MK IIAI 1 WEI DY 217 

Box 354 

Newell. NC 28126 
TYLER. JEIIREY ALAN 216. 2.17 

1716 Stoncehff Cl 

IX-catur. (iA 10031 



u 



L 1 INI . BR \1>1 1 \ Kit II \RD /.' 



(Ic, 



I 1 



sK. 



1 MllAl ANDRI W Nl I IR , 

8805 Connecticut Ave 

( ho\ ( hasc. MD 218115 
L NDI RWOOl) RUSSEI I 111 

44III Shalt. lion Dr 

Wmslon SjlcMi, N( :-|ll6 
I NION ( OMMinHS 61. 
I NION OEH( IS Isi. 
I l'( 111 R( 11 I 1 1Z\H1 ill \^ 

'16. ,ir 

1086 DogwiHKl Dr 
East Point. GA 10144 
I RAM. KEVIN J \MI s 52. 28 
I 36 W ilh.ims Rd 
Butler. PA IMHIl 



i AGT. (il ORGI ANNE 94 

i Al \ K\ . DIDll R A J .'66 

( hcmin dc Plais.incc 14120 

Pendant I annce I niversitai 

C I Triolet Bat II ch71 



Montpcllicr 

France 
VANCE. JAMES BURTON 1.16. 4: 

2930 Club Park Rd 

Winston Salem. NC 27104 
VAN DELL. JOHN THOMAS 56. 



122. 



2716 Windovcr 

Corona Del Mar. C \ 92625 
VANDFRPOOl JL 1 11 1 YNN 

1925 Spalding Dr 

Atlanta. (iA 30118 
VAN METRE. 1 ALREN 1 OL ISE 224 

9006 9006 Nomin. I n 

Alexandria. V A 22.109 
VAN VOORHEES. WENDY 274. .116 

6394 Gun Club Rd 

West Palm Beach. FL 33406 
VASS. KARL DOUGLAS JR 54. 250 

429 Windcmcrc Rd 

Wilmington. NC 28405 
VASSOS. JOHN NICHOLAS 46. 115. 

13503 Crispin Way 

Rockvillc. MD 20853 
VENTURELII. PETER J 221 
VERDI. JOHN 72 
VERNON. CARY MCGEE 

1714 Maryland Ave. 

Charlotte. NC 28209 
VEST. CARTER ELIZABETH 226 

302 Rivervicw Rd 

Athens. GA 30606 
VIA. El DRID(iE F JR 115 

Rl 3 Box 320 

Waynesboro. VA 22980 
VIEST. NICHOLAS D .14. 2.36. 217 

215 E 79 St Apt 8E 

New York. NY 10021 
VON HI RRMANN. SLSAN (i 26 1 

1804 Elkhart Dr 

Greensboro. NC 27408 
VOORHIS. DANll 1 THOMAS 22' 



i 



. Whit 



nRd 



Woods Hole. Ml 



w 



W ADDll 1 DAMD HOWARD 34. 
145. 155. 159, .1)6. 60. ,SJ 
3385 Sledd Ci 



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SC 27 



W \DE. Tl Rl NC 1 ROBI RT <2. 51. 26.1. 2 

976 Campbclllon Dr 

North Augusta. SC 29841 
WAGNER. VAN LEWIS 56. 132. 133. 32" 

ItHKl Devonwood 

(iahon. OH 44831 
W AGONER ROBI RT BRl C I 1'6 

503 Willow Dr 

Thomasvillc. NC 27160 
WAHI . HAROI 1) B JR I. 15^. 339. 147 

515 Ponte Vedra Blvd 

Ponte Vedra Be.ich. IE 32082 
W AHl . W 11 1 I \M B JR 46. 122. 12.1. 251 

21 lorcsl Tr.!il 

B.iskinp Ridge. NJ ir92tl 
WAICOTT. ANN B\R(I \\ 31S. 119. I' 

41 Brookslone Dr 

Princeton. NJ 08540 
WAICOTT. JAMES DEXTER JR 212 

41 Brookslone Dr 

Princclon. NJ 08540 
W \1 Kl R. IIAI I AM 121. 221 
W M Kl R, HIRAM /'4 
V. M KER. LI ON \RD JR s' (/,s. 131. 2,* 

2422 S I ag.e Wai 

\urorj. CO 818)14 
W \1 Kl R THOMAS WORTH 214. 2.17 



4110 Towanda Trail 

Knoxville. TN 37919 
W Al 1 A( I . BRl (I A 15. .19. ml. 26 

119 Merion Ave 

Haddonficld. NJ 08033 
W \l I I R ROBERT STl PHFN 119 

PO Box 68- 

\lbanv, (.\ iril2 
W M IS DWll) STVNl I > 14S. 147 

819 II Ouanto Dr 

Danville. C A 94^:6 
W M 1 STl DT BRl ( I M AN S6. ;/s 

stll Carlton Rd 

Palmetto. (1 \ 10268 
W Al Tl R. Bl RNVDI TTl RITI16S. 

115. 13s. 319 



201 Dogwmid I n 



John 



, TN 



W Al TIRS. SHANNON I 1 1 94, 

461-' Princess \nnc 1 n 

Jacksonville. I 1 12210 
W Al TON. (iARI RKIIVRl) 12 

867 Castle I alls Dr 

Atlanta. (iA 10329 



PATRONS 



Robert S Abernathy. III. MD; Harvard Medical School; Massachusetts General Hospital; Class o( 1962 

John M Akers. LL D; Class of 1928. 

MAJ GtN Brook E Allen. CISAF (Ret ); Class ol 1933 

Barger Construction Company. Mooresville. North Carolina. 

BRIG GEN James H Balte, US Army (Ret.); Class of 1936. 

John P Baum; Manager. Dress Division of Oxford Industries; Class of 1964. 

Rot>ert G Bradford; Vice President. Burlington Industries; Class of 1962. 

A. Lyndon Foscue; Former Vice President. Union Carbide Corporation; Class of 1920. 

W. Wyche Fowler. Jr ; Member of Congress. Class of 1962 

Hugh R. Gaither; Finance Manager. Ridgeview Hosiery. Class of 1972. 

Kenneth R Gallup. Jr . MD; Class of 1969. 

Samuel M. Hemphill; Treasures. Century Furniture Company; Class of 1939. 

James E. Holshouser. Jr ; Former Govenor of North Carolina; Class of 1956. 

William E. Loftin. Sr ; Class of 1941 

J Hugh Malone. Jr.. MD; Class of 1936. 

Charles W. McCrary. Jr.; President. AcmeMcCrary Corporation; Class of 1956. 

J. Alexander McMillan. Ill; President. Harris Teeter. 

Donald D McNeill. Jr . MD; Class of 1961 

John W Parks. 111. CLU; Class of 1962. 

Pharr Yarns. McAdenville. North Carolina 

Dean Rusk; Former Secretary of State; Professor. School of Law. University of Georgia; Class of 1931. 

Smyre Manufacturing Company. Gastonia. North Carolina. 

Arnold H Snider; Vice President. Kidder Peabody and Company; Class of 1966. 

Wray M. Stephens; Vice President. Stephens Supply Company. Class of 1970. 

Charles Trexler; President. Stewart and Everette Theatres 

John A Wheliss. MD; Class of 1948 

Anonymous 

Piedmont Bank and Trust. Davidson. North Carolina 



Corpofale Adv(rftis«menl 



A Friend 



ADVERTISEMENTS 371 



w wtiM 1 K. NAM ^ « J.', ■w. :<'.'. '■! 

IIK W.iliiul l)r 

N.ivhviiic. T\ .^:(l^ 
WARD. I'AI I Kl \M TH J.l. >.' 

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WARD. STI I'll! S \<ISN /.'». .'.<» 

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I ilhimi.i. (.A IIID^S 
WARMR. lOllS Slow .]R -V.v, .M-. '.I' 

4j:i( Shcpp.ird I'l.itc 

\.i>hnlk. TN .W2(l> 
W ARRIN. RUSSl I 1 t --'W 
WARRKK. .lAV Ml NDI RSON .V. ' 

I' O Box '■')■) 

Miinroc. NC :»l HI 
WARSMAM. RACIII I IK» 
WASIMNOTON. Wl SDI I I I ,v.. / / > 

l>0 Bo< mil 

CUnlon. Al KIM* 
WATl RS. Rl BIKA \SM /.';. J.V -M7 

lll.S Dcc.lur Rd 

JackMVUilk-. S( .>MII 
W AT.SON, IIK'l N \ \l U -I \ M. r,". IJ. -V. I 

lOH.l Andrt«- l)r S V\ 

Ml.inl.l. <.\ ICI.III^ 
V, VTSON. RK KV 111 •". ,>J. v\ >-' 

Mil B;uj< Miranuiin Rd 

WirlMon S.ilcnl. \( 27 1(1^ 

winv RVDio ■: 

WDSR R\D1() : 

Wl BB. DWII) Wll I l\M /.I7. IIS. .l.m 

;4K Islr.ld.i Avo 

Si. AufUMinc. I I i:ils4 
Wl-BBl.R. JL 1 lA I I 1/\BI III ;:■ is' :i 



llcNs Bhii 
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W I Hsn R, (il ORl.l 1) III 1 IS, W. >' 

.*1II1 t.irdin.il i 1 

Bclhc-d.i. Ml) :(llll(, 
WKBSTKR. MARCU.S NASSIB >.!. ■».< 

1816 (.icullv Dr 
WinM..n S.ik-m Nf 27106 
Wl III MRU SI . GORDON l!2 
W I LSSI k \ lul IT J 112 
W I iss. I RK WDRI W .<-). 2.<(). .-^a .<; 



' Don 



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Si PcUTsburp. 1 I .1.171(1 
Wl ISS. KIMBI Rl V ANN .'22. . 

Rl 4 Bov 1711) 

Ch.ipcl Mill. NC 27M4 
Wl ITNAl 1 R. DWll) 1)1 Nk 2i 

I W imbcrl) C I 

Dcc.ilur. OA l(»lln 
Wl.l.C'MMAN. DWIll H\KRI I 

.I.W. Ml 

201(1 M.inur Mill Rd 

(h.irlollc. N( 21121 I 
Will BORN. M \RSM\I I .1 II 

11(11 RMtkinj'h.Hn l)r NW 
Ml.iril.i, (, \ im:" 
Wills. \NI)R1 W HI NDl KSC 

44' Slccplc (. h.iNt I II 

Btld^•t■».llc^ N.l llliX(r 

w I 1 sM w II Ml R II II. :ii: J 

W I I I ■! k \RI N 1 I l/ABI III 

22> 26lh \>c N 

Si RclcrNburg. 1 1 .1.17(14 
. W 1 ST. BRl CI STI W ART 2(. f 

117 (;,MKj».ird Rd 

Rithimind. VA 2.12.1S 
WIST. DWll) ANDRl W ^h. 22 

I2(ll< kmibb Mill Dr 

J.KkMinidlt, 1 I 1220.< 
Wl ST ION \1 M \N ( ROW I *. 



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(.62 Vi.i 1 ido Nord 

Nc»p..r( Bt.Kh. I \ '12661 
Wl STI RVI I T, Rl TM \NN 4 

V O Bo< 61(1 

I 111,11111.1. 1 I 127K4 
Wl STON. Bl NN1T\ 1 

.11(1.1 M.inlc.iliii Di 

J.ick-oii>illc. 1 1 122IIK 
WlIM IN ROBl RT 1 MMI T 

ISlll WcM.ivcr Rd 
Durh.im. Nt 27707 
WlIM IN. TIMOTMV .1 41. 6 
>I14 Dcom^u.n I n 



rn,, |i.i 



Ml) : 



W Ml 1 I I R lOMN T 1st: 1117 

Will 1 I I R, S\RA 1 VN 144. .'^1. JO 

112 1 kcnilv>urlh Dr 

(irccimllc. SC 2161 S 
Will 1 1 (K k kl AIN R\V 144. 160. , 

261* Mi:n»clhi.r Dr 

Ih.irloutsMlk. \ \ 22101 
W III 1 \N M \Rk RK. M \RI) 21' 



Rl 1 Bin 485 
(irocnvillc. NC 27834 
WMITi;, LOCK1-; JR .'20 
WMITESlDliS. I-.DWARD W. fj. 144, :>l 
6371 Mulberry Ln. 
Slocklon, CA 1.1212 
WHlTESIDtS, l.r.f-; MCl.liAN ll.\ -'JJ 
2650 Armslrong Circle 
Gaslonia, NC 28052 
WHITESIDES, ROSEANNE JD, .WO. .Ul 
2548 Fairfax Dr. 
Gasloni,!. NC 28052 
WMITI IV. JAMliS CRAKi .WO. 50 
114 Aiiiily Circle 
Belmonl. NC 28012 
WHITl.OCK. El INOS A Ml //, .'6J 
Rl. 1 Box 473 
Slanlcy, NC 28164 
WHITl.OCK, PAMELA J 2.11. 24 
134 Wyanokc Ave. 
CharloKc, NC 28205 
WHITMAN. WIl.l.lAM T 221 
WMITMIRl:. BRIAN 46. Ilf. 26.) 
5077 Bradford Rd 
JackMinville. El. 32217 
WIIITMORE. MARTHA ANNE 283. WO. 40 
Rl 1 Box 212 
kcnbridgc, VA .:3144 
WICkER, .STEWART 2.W 
5164 Joffa Place 
Sprrngfield. VA 22150 
WIDICK. MARK HAYDEN 2.5; 
410 Naish Ave 
Cocoa Beach. H. 32131 
W II COX. ADELAIDE L 12,v. 121. 26.1, .17 
828 kenmorc Rd 
Chapel Hill. NC 27514 
VMLDCATCLIB 112 
WILDCAT HANDBOOK 70 
WILEY. CHARLES ADEN III :}4 
3401 Obcrlin Dr. 
C,recn»boro, NC 27405 
WILLY, DOUGLAS STEWART 90. 103. JJ7 
3818 N Woodrow Si 
Arlinglon, VA 22207 
WTLklNS. STEPHEN HOWELL 221. 2.17 
560 Grandvcw 
San Anlonio. TX 78201 
WILLIAMS. ANN ROBIN 23. 240. 26.1 
4408 Coral Poinl Dr 
Morehead CiU. NC 28557 
WILLIAMS. BENJAMIN E JR, 2-T7 
2521 Catherine Dr 
Burlinglon. NC 27215 
WILLIAMS. (. RYSTAL FAITH 25( 
5252 Open Window 
Columbia. MD 21044 
WILLIAMS. DEBRA JEAN 6S. 224, m 
2574 Woodwardia Rd. 
Allanla, OA 30345 
Wll 1 I VMS. I I l/VBETH E 2.*;. .17 
6407 Three ( hopi Rd 
Rithiiiond V \ 23226 
W II LI VMS. Jl I I RFY C 7,1 
106 Mill Run Place 
(ioldsboro. NC 27530 
Wll LIAMS. kl NDRK k D .V7. 11.1. 124, 12.5 
3.11 

17 Duranle Place 
Durham. NC 27704 
Wll I KMS. RK HARD T 
301 I dgehill Rd 
Wjvnc. P'V 111187 
Wll I 1 VMS, RU.SSLI TODD W. Jll 
2241 kimbrough Woods 
(,ermanlo»n. TN 38138 
W II.LIVMS. WILLIAM ; 90. 298 
WIll.lNCiHAM. E. l.EE III I9J. 113 
WILLIS, EDWARD R II IIS. 22? 
Rl 2 Box 710D 
(irecn Cove Spring, FL 32043 
W II SON. ANDREW SCOTT ;4.T. 2.17. 24.' 



12 Pe. 



I Dr 



Morgaiilon. NC 28655 
WIL.SON, ELIZABETH LOUISE 211 

112 Pearson Dr 

Morganlon. NC 28655 
WILSON, KENNETH WAYNE K7. Wf 

Rl 7 Box 306 

FayelleviMc. NC 28306 
WILSON. MARY S 112 
WILSON. RICHARD FENTON 101. I.1S 

1106 Lamson Place 

Mlel.ean. VA 22101 
WILSON. Wll I LVM CLARK 40. 41 



WIND ENSKMBLF. 76 

WINDHAM, MARY El.lZABITll 26.1. .17 

8111 Emory Dr. 

Chapel Hill, NC 27514 
WlNkl ER. JULIUS S, 66. 220 
WINSTON. ROBERT E 1 111 227. 2.17 

6701 Virginia Circle 

(.harloue. \C 28214 
W ITIIERSPOON. TANDA ALLEN .UO. Ml 

833 Chflon Rd 

Allanla. GA .30307 
WITHROW. FRED DALE M. 177.2.M. /*. 40 

131 W'cMwjy Rd Apl. T-1 



Greenbell, MD 20770 
WITTY. SIMON D-K. 26» 

Elal 14 

River House 

The Terrace 

Barnes 

London SW 13 ONR 

England 
WOLF. ALBERT ALLEN JR 

221 Pine Rd. 

Davidson. NC 28036 
WOLF, ALLEN 220 
WOLF. RUTH SABINA 211 

604 65th Si. Cl NW 

Bradenton, FL 33505 
WOMACK, JEANNE ENGLISH 106. 107, 211 

1205 Whitby Rd 

Richmond. VA 23227 
WOMEN'S CENTER 86 
WOMEN'S CHORl S 74 
WOOD, KENNETH N 2S. 21 
WOODARD, JOSEPH C JR 122. 2.11 

6024 Woodcresi Dr 

Raleigh. NC 27603 
WOODS. CHRISTOPHER C, 237. 233 

200 Mile Common 

Fairfield, CT 06430 
WOODWARD. PAT ML.NROE JR 46. 237 

Rl, 2 Box 188 

Oumcy. FL 32351 
WOOTEN. EARl GI.ENDELL 144. 2J7, 7.5. 

2.12 

Star Rt Box 11 

Maysville. NC 28555 
WORKMAN, WILLIAM G /4.5 
WORTH. ALLEN FRA7IER 26.) 

P O Box 26 

Jefferson. NC 28640 
WRENN, JOHN JEFFRIES .s4, 340 341 

205 S Belvedere 

Memphis. TN 38104 
WRESTLING TEAM 132 
WRIGHT. JEFFREY H 26. 14. 144. 26.) 

Rt 7 Box 36SB Hwy 150 

Greensboro. NC 27408 
WRIGHT. NANCY MANN 91, 110. 144. .14.) 

Ill Lolhian Dr 

Tallahassee. FL 32.103 
WRIGHT. THEODORE MANNING .54. 227 

Rl 2 Box 368 B Hwy 150 

Greensboro. NC 27408 
WRUCk. ERIC GORDON 



Pmc Rd 

Davidson, NC 28036 
WRUCk. ERICH O 2. 



V STUDENT (ORPS 78 

YE1L1)IN(., NEWMAN M 111 14. .)4.1 

3212 Salisbury Rd 

Birmingham. AL 15213 
YOUNG. 1)1 BBY 181 
YOUNG. JAMES VINCENT JR .s'4. ill 

DAO American Embassy 

A PO 

San Francisco. CA 16301 
YOUNG. JONATHAN FLINT 102. 101 

432 Hascall Rd NW 

Atlanta, GA 30101 
YOUNG. LISA MARGUERITE (27. 2.5/. «« 

185 Winding Creek Trail 

Atlanta. GA 30328 



ZEMP. E EACH JR .s2. 211 

Rt 3 

Camden. SC 21020 
ZEPH. GREGORY MATTHEW .14.1 

1000 McEarland Si 

Duncdin. FL 13528 
/lEDONIA. DOUGLAS M 49. 16. 2S6. .WJ 

507 Green Cl 

Bethleham. PA 18015 
ZIELINSkl. BRYAN C .56. 2.14. 2.)7 

2831 NE 36lh Si 

El Lauderdale. FL 33308 
ZIMMERMAN, NANCY ANN .19. 6S. 69. 341 

15 Oak Rd 

Salisbury, NC 28144 
ZIMMERMANN. THOMAS PRICE 144, 152, 

I7S. 171. 118. 252 
ZOUTEWEI.I.E. ANDREW (L .)4. 211 

2136 Malvern Rd 

Charlotte. NC 28207 
ZURBRUE(;(;. CAMERON S 1. 103. 144. 

192. 343 

81 Mill St 

Binghamlon. NY 13102 



Compliments Of 



Mark A. Conner. Photography Editor 



Russell G. Snipes, Business Manager 




nobody can do it like McDonald's canl 

Mooresville, M.C. 




S RlXALI 
Main Street 
avidson, M.C. 



Local Advertis 



^©^ 






@ 









Leslie R. Howell 

Yearbook, Spiritwear Salesman 
Phone 704-847-7085 



ADVERTISEMENTS 373 




For Those Who Are Interested 




Dreams are wonderful. They are the spark 
for the fire: the source of all progress and 
develooment. No great achievement or ac- 
complishment has ever been made without 
first beginning as one man's dream. 

[^spite the great potential for dreams, how- 
ever, the term "dreamer" is too often used 
derogatorily in reference to the Man of to- 
day's society. Oddly enough, the "dreamer" 
is seen as an idle thinker and a non-realist, 
when, in theory, he should be considered one 
of the most admirable individuals because of 
his potential for progress. Why, then has such 
a negative connotation attached itself to such 
a positive concept? The answer . . . Because 
today's dreamer is one who fails to act. A 
dream can never become an accomplishment 
on its own; it takes Man's addition of ACTION 




to make dreams a reality. 

I wanted to produce THE PERFECT YEAR- 
BOOK; this was my goal ... my dream. I 
recognized that this would not be easy (Is 
perfection ever easy?), and I was willing to 
work towards it. The 1981 Quips and Cranks 
is not THE PERFECT YEARBOOK, but it has 
made much greater progress towards perfec- 
tion than any previous yearbook, due, simply, 
to the conception of a dream and action upon 
this dream. 

In reference to this yearbook, so many 
times I heard people say, "I had a lot of good 
ideas for the Quips and Cranks, but David- 
son's past yearbooks have been so bad that I 
felt it was hopeless to try to improve it." I do 
not hold this ideal for the yearbook or for 
anything else in my life, and anyone who does 
is wasting his human potential. Where would 
the world be if this accepting, stagnating atti- 
tude were held here and practiced? 

The process of change has two main adver- 
saries: complacency and skepticism. It fs 
much easier to accept than it is to do. just as 
it is easier to dream than it is to dream and 
act. The "Doer" must have the strength to 
act regardless of the public . . . regardless of 
the skeptics. Much of society is wary of 
change; they see it as an uncontrollable, un- 
predictable enemy. But unless our world is to 
remain as it is today, devoid of future pro- 
gress, the "Doer" must surmount public 
skepticism and challenge, in his efforts to 
reach new and greater heights of achieve 
ment. 

The old myth that "Change is impossible at 
Davidson" is a falsehood. This yearbook ex- 
empliHes this fallacy. Change at [Davidson is 
not an easy task, but neither is it easy in the 
"real" world. One confronts complacency 
and skepticism both inside and outside the 
confines of Davidson's campus, but both ob- 
stacles are conquerable anywhere. Progress 
and improvement are here for the taking, but 
they do not come effortlessly. The future and 
quality of the Davidson College Quips and 
Cranks, as well as the future and quality of 
the entire world, is in the hands of all who are 
capable of dreams and capable of action (i.e. 
all Man). It's here for the doing. Who's inter- 
ested? 

-Diane Odom, Editor 

EVERY MINUTE COUNTS when ones dealing with 
the Quips and Cranks staff, a deadline day. and the 
5:00 p.m. closing of the Post Office. The span of time 
between 4:55 p.m.- and 5:00 p.m. was crucial, and the 

_-.,,.: . gyj characteristic: Editor, Diane 

I assistant Scott Otto (who was 
onhand for every Deadline-Dash made throughout the 
year) frantically packaged the pages for mailing. The 
Mad-Dash from the Student Union terminated with a 
whirlwind entry into the Post-Office, often barely 
beating the hands of the clock and the clicking of the 
lock. Photo Editor, Snatch Conner caught this hectic 
ritual in action with his camera. 



1981 STAFF 



Editor: Diane Odom 

Assistant to the Editor: Miranda Morrison 

Business Manager: Russell G. Snipes, Jr. 

Photography Editor: Mark (Snatch) Conner 

Copy Editor: Lisa Sloan 

Index Editor: Dale Withrow 



Business Staff: 

Carl Anderson 

Karen Hopper 
Layout Staff: 

Karen Welty 

Philip Alter 

Debby Williams 

Scott Otto 

Laura Curry 

Jim Reese 

Chris Gunn 

Bryna Watson 

Carol Roche 

Kathleen Huff 

Mike Allen 

Dennard Lindsey 

Nan Zimmerman 

Reaves Robinson 
Copy Staff: 

Caroline Boudreau, Frances Palmer, Katie Tully, 

Tracy Thompson, Mike Mason, Karen Welty. 
Chief Photographers: 

Jim Morgan, Lee McCormick, Tim Boyer. 
Satelite Photographers: 

Cathey Hemenway, Caroline Massey, Knox Kerr, 

John Cain, John Hendrix, Elizabeth Flanders, Tur- 

ley Howard, Eric Long, Chris Gauch, Scott Haight, 

Janet Lindsley, Jeff Tilbury, Liz Ribadenyra, 

Steve Stine.